Solvent for WD 40?


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EddieCoyle
November 26, 2005, 11:23 PM
A friend recently got engaged and I was helping him move out of his house, and into the the house he and his wife-to-be will occupy. We were removing the last of the stuff from his place when he pulled out a box from the attic, opened it, and inside revealed an M1 Carbine that belonged to his late father. His wife to be (she's very anti gun, he's gun-neutral) flips out when she sees the M1, acting as if it was going to load itself and chase them around the house. She tells him in no uncertain terms that she will not be in a house with a gun.

He turns to me and says, "You want it?"
I say, "Will I have to give it back when you get divorced?"
He said, "Nope. It's yours."

He then tells me that it should be in "good shape" because before he put it away (10 years ago) he poured WD 40 down the barrel and into the action. :banghead:

I haven't had a chance to examine it closely, and won't have time to clean it until the weekend, but it looks like somebody poured a mix of caramel, maple syrup, and glue into it. The magazine is stuck, the bolt barely moves, etc.

So, can anyone recommend a good solvent for WD 40?

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loumarch
November 26, 2005, 11:31 PM
Get some Break-Free CLP. It will slowly dissolve all that mess. Then use a good foaming bore cleaner down the barrel and let it soak at least 30 minutes.
Brush with a brass or synthetic brush and dry with patches. You'll probably need to reclean it a couple of times to get it perfect. You can also use brake cleaner on the action to break up everything.

Hawkmoon
November 26, 2005, 11:31 PM
A friend recently got engaged and I was helping him move out of his house, and into the the house he and his wife-to-be will occupy. We were removing the last of the stuff from his place when he pulled out a box from the attic, opened it, and inside revealed an M1 Carbine that belonged to his late father. His wife to be (she's very anti gun, he's gun-neutral) flips out when she sees the M1, acting as if it was going to load itself and chase them around the house. She tells him in no uncertain terms that she will not be in a house with a gun.

He turns to me and says, "You want it?"
I say, "Will I have to give it back when you get divorced?"
He said, "Nope. It's yours."

He then tells me that it should be in "good shape" because before he put it away (10 years ago) he poured WD 40 down the barrel and into the action. :banghead:

I haven't had a chance to examine it closely, and won't have time to clean it until the weekend, but it looks like somebody poured a mix of caramel, maple syrup, and glue into it. The magazine is stuck, the bolt barely moves, etc.

So, can anyone recommend a good solvent for WD 40?
Try automotice carburetor cleaner. If that doesn't work, move up to brake cleaner.

SIGarmed
November 26, 2005, 11:32 PM
A friend recently got engaged and I was helping him move out of his house, and into the the house he and his wife-to-be will occupy. We were removing the last of the stuff from his place when he pulled out a box from the attic, opened it, and inside revealed an M1 Carbine that belonged to his late father. His wife to be (she's very anti gun, he's gun-neutral) flips out when she sees the M1, acting as if it was going to load itself and chase them around the house. She tells him in no uncertain terms that she will not be in a house with a gun.

He turns to me and says, "You want it?"
I say, "Will I have to give it back when you get divorced?"
He said, "Nope. It's yours."

He then tells me that it should be in "good shape" because before he put it away (10 years ago) he poured WD 40 down the barrel and into the action. :banghead:

I haven't had a chance to examine it closely, and won't have time to clean it until the weekend, but it looks like somebody poured a mix of caramel, maple syrup, and glue into it. The magazine is stuck, the bolt barely moves, etc.

So, can anyone recommend a good solvent for WD 40?

Why not just break it down and clean it like you normally would? I don't think the WD 40 is going to hurt it. That stuff was made to spray on metal and electric parts in the first place. You're going to have to break it down and clean it before you shoot it anyway.

P95Carry
November 26, 2005, 11:33 PM
Never tried to ''de-yuk'' WD40 but would proceed by removing all woodwork and then dunk whole darned gun in kerosene - for staters. See if that will loosen up sticky parts. Maybe even acetone too but watch your skin re getting all its grease getting sucked out - ventilated area too.

Then well - I start thinking of carb cleaner - gub scrubber type deals - real solvents. This should hopefully cut thru the gum eventually. After that - dissassemble and clean components followed by lube and reassemble.

Others may already have tried this and know what works best.

What a sad, sad, case re your buddy and ''that'' wife of his.:(

EddieCoyle
November 26, 2005, 11:41 PM
Why not just break it down and clean it like you normally would? I don't think the WD 40 is going to hurt it. That stuff was made to spray on metal and electric parts in the first place. You're going to have to break it down and clean it before you shoot it anyway.

You'd really have to see it. After a time, WD 40 dries to a hard glaze. In places where it settled, it is about 1/8" thick. You can't even dent or scratch it with your thumbnail. The magazine looks like it was varnished into place.

I like the idea of removing the wood (if I can get it off - I'm worried about splitting the stock trying to remove it) and soaking it. I made up a 4 foot length of rain gutter with caps on both ends for similar gun-soaking projects.

Will kerosene dissolve WD 40?

P95Carry
November 26, 2005, 11:46 PM
I doubt kero' will dissolve the WD40 ''varnish'' / gum. But I'd try it to see if it'll soften things up - may take days.

Once things soften then hopefully some disassembly might be possible and then step up the solvent aggressiveness.

To get wood off - maybe some Kroil around vital spots - which might help ease wood away and even if desperate - put whole darned gun in kero' !! I reckon the wood can be dealt with after and purged of the kero' - tho a messy and smelly job.

Still - hope someone else has actual hands on experience of this - the better to set you on right path. I am only thinkin' out loud really ;)

Oldnamvet
November 26, 2005, 11:53 PM
You've got WD-40 varnish - use varnish remover. It is meant to remove varnish from wood (has lots of methylene chloride in it) so it shouldn't harm the wood. Just be sure to do it outside and avoid the fumes. Wear gloves, goggles, and a rubber apron is also good to keep it off your clothes.

rustymaggot
November 26, 2005, 11:54 PM
wd40 disolves wd40 varnish. soak it again in the stuff and wait a few days. carb cleaner is to harsh on things as well as harsh on your lungs. eventually the varnish will soften up with repeated spraying of wd40.

hoppe's number 9 will disolve that stuff too, but hoppe's is more expensive. save that for the final cleaning.

i am so green with envy here! i love m1 carbines! i wish my buddies would give me one.

Flatfender
November 26, 2005, 11:55 PM
Call WD40 and ask. 888-324-7596

http://www.wd40.com/index.cfm

Pilgrim
November 27, 2005, 12:02 AM
His wife to be (she's very anti gun, he's gun-neutral) flips out when she sees the M1, acting as if it was going to load itself and chase them around the house. She tells him in no uncertain terms that she will not be in a house with a gun.
Your friend received a very important clue. I hope he studies it before going any further with this proposed marriage.

Pilgrim

EddieCoyle
November 27, 2005, 12:03 AM
Call WD40 and ask. 888-324-7596

http://www.wd40.com/index.cfm

I just called. They told me to go to www.wd-40.com and send an email. If you click on that link, you'll see that it's under construction.
www.wd40.com works though.

EddieCoyle
November 27, 2005, 12:04 AM
Your friend received a very important clue. I hope he studies it before going any further with this proposed marriage.

Pilgrim


Yeah, I agree. That's why I asked if I could keep it after the divorce. He won't though.

nfl1990
November 27, 2005, 12:52 AM
Try some brake clean on it.

grizz5675
November 27, 2005, 01:02 AM
sounds to me like you have more then just wd40 ,i would say you have wd40 mixed with cosmoline.

sm
November 27, 2005, 01:04 AM
Give the gal $200 in ones, have her dress in most skimpy outfit and dump her at a male strip club. Forget her.

Use mineral spirits to clean M1 Carbine, take the guy shooting and pay for ammo, range fees and lunch.

Better to have half this couple on Pro Gun side than both on Anti Gun side.

50% winnings beats a 100% loss any day.

trapperjohn
November 27, 2005, 01:25 AM
I think I would try giving it a good soaking in Ed's Red.

TonkinTwentyMil
November 27, 2005, 02:55 AM
You owe your buddy a big favor, now.

I suggest you have an attorney draft a PRE-NUPTIAL AGREEMENT for him (for his own protection). With that ditz-brained/lib-snot b**ch, he's gonna need it.

brerrabbit
November 27, 2005, 03:04 AM
I go with RustyMaggot on this one. I use WD-40 on a lot of relatively hi temp systems. Eventually it will turn to a varnish. More WD-40 and a little wiping seems to soften it right up.

mete
November 27, 2005, 08:31 AM
Boiling trisodiumphosphate should work well [don't use on aluminum !!!] or trichlorethylene.

jerkface11
November 27, 2005, 09:04 AM
Try the WD40 to remove the varnish. If that won't work gumout or break cleaner will.

JMusic
November 27, 2005, 09:25 AM
About every thing said wil eventially work. WD -40 has paraffin in it and WD -40 is probably the best solvent to melt this back to its liquid state. I would then use a metal degreeser to get rid of WD-40. It works good for porch swings and garden rakes but it is a big no no for firearms. I was brought a Remington 7400 that a guy had and said it would not fire. He thought the firing pin was broken. What had actually happened was he used WD-40 to lube his firearms and generally would spray inside the action. It was so gummed up the firing pin could not build enough energy to mark the primer. Once clean it worked fine. I used the technique above to clean it.
Jim

6inch
November 27, 2005, 10:56 AM
I wonder which one is going to wear the wedding dress?? :rolleyes:

EddieCoyle
November 27, 2005, 11:14 AM
I heard back from the folks at WD40.com. Big surprise, their answer was...

More WD 40!

I'll pick up a gallon at Home Depot and let it soak for a few days. Thanks all for your help.

You owe your buddy a big favor, now.
Not really, I've helped this guy move about 10 times - I figure we're even.

Darrellbear
November 27, 2005, 11:24 AM
WD40 sucks bigtime. Get some Kroil, it's everything WD40 wishes it was. Soak it down and let it set for a while, then start working it, things should start freeing up.

jem375
November 27, 2005, 11:28 AM
WD40 sucks bigtime. Get some Kroil, it's everything WD40 wishes it was. Soak it down and let it set for a while, then start working it, things should start freeing up.I learned my lesson about WD40 years ago deer hunting in sub-zero weather, turns to gunk and the firing pins wouldn't work on the rifles that I used to use WD40. I also use Kroil Oil and it works great.

patrol120
November 27, 2005, 11:43 AM
WD40 does not suck in any way. It is the very, very best at what it was designed for...water displacment. It makes a poor lubricant, but a very good waterproofer.

Kroil is a good penetrating oil, as is PB Blaster, but neither are nearly as good at water displacement.

49hudson
November 27, 2005, 04:26 PM
Charcoal lighter fluid is cheap and contains naptha, which is an excellent solvent for petroleum distillates.

JohnKSa
November 27, 2005, 05:06 PM
wd40 disolves wd40 varnishDing! Ding! Ding!

Just make sure to get rid of any excess WD-40 after you're done cleaning and replace it with some good stuff.

EddieCoyle
November 27, 2005, 06:45 PM
Ding! Ding! Ding!

Just make sure to get rid of any excess WD-40 after you're done cleaning and replace it with some good stuff.

I got it submerged in WD 40 right now. It seems to be softening up, but slowly. I did get the magazine out. I'll post a pic after I get it ungunked, detail stripped, and cleaned.

I should've taken a "before" pic.

Larry Ashcraft
November 27, 2005, 07:09 PM
Charcoal lighter fluid is cheap and contains naptha, which is an excellent solvent for petroleum distillates.
You can buy VM&P naphtha at the lumberyard even cheaper by the gallon. It's a great solvent for decals, price tags, glue etc. It is a staple at my shop, a squeeze bottle on every workbench. Also, it won't hurt hardly any finish.

entropy
November 28, 2005, 02:36 PM
Brake Cleaner, or Mineral Spirits, or your basic solvent tank-type solvent will work about the fastest, but as you are finding out, WD-40 does indeed work.
I can't afford to wait that long.

I was brought a Remington 7400 that a guy had and said it would not fire. He thought the firing pin was broken. What had actually happened was he used WD-40 to lube his firearms and generally would spray inside the action. It was so gummed up the firing pin could not build enough energy to mark the primer. Once clean it worked fine. I used the technique above to clean it.


I get about six to a dozen of them each fall; guys will meticulously [as best they can] clean their 742/7400, then soak it in WD-40 to store it. They wait till two days before deer season to sight in, or don't bother at all, and then wonder why it doesn't fire. We use BreakFree CLP to lube them when we're done, and these yahoos wipe it off and out WD-40 back on, then come in hoppin' mad because it wouldn't fire when they had Ol' Mossyhorns in the scope....:rolleyes: Keeps me workin, I guess, but frustrating...:cuss:

molonlabe
November 28, 2005, 02:44 PM
Doesnít surprise me. WD40 is highly refined kerosene with some waxes (paraffin) in it. It really isnít designed as a rust inhibitor since it will dry out.

TooTaxed
November 28, 2005, 03:37 PM
WD-40 is a solvent, not a lubricant! DON'T use it to protect your firearms!:eek:

I mostly use it for removing gummed labels from plastic containers I want to reuse for something else...and even then you have to use a degreaser to get the WD-40 residue off so labels will stick!

Sheldon J
November 28, 2005, 09:08 PM
Doesnít surprise me. WD40 is highly refined kerosene with some waxes (paraffin) in it. It really isnít designed as a rust inhibitor since it will dry out.
Actually consumers reports did a test of several rust inhibitors a few years back, and ol WD was there. The sprayed it on a hunk of iron then put it in a salt spay. Did this with quite a few different spray oils. Even had a untreated hunk for a standard. Although WD was not the best it rated in the top 5.

tube_ee
November 29, 2005, 12:31 AM
WD-40 is, as has been said, a water dispersant and rust preventative, not a lubricant. The fact that it has some slight lubricating proerties has led more people astray than I can count. I used to work at a bike shop. I've seen what WD-40 does to a chain.

The stuff was actually developed for coating ICBM bodies, to keep water from condensing on them and causing corrosion. It was the 40th formula the company tried. Last I heard, it was still used for that purpose. They apply it with a mop.

Bottom line, use it for what it's for... which is NOT lubricating stuff.

--Shannon

ScottsGT
November 29, 2005, 08:21 AM
I think I encountered the same problem last week with my used Colt 1911 I bought. I think the PO used WD-40 as a wipe down solvent after each range session. It had a yellow crust caked up under the grips. I had to use Aircraft Paint Stripper to remove the crap.
If the WD-40 bath does not work, try "Aircraft Stripper" paint remover available at auto body supply houses and parts stores. Don't use it on aluminum! But you should not have that problem with an M-1 Carbine.

EddieCoyle
December 11, 2005, 09:43 PM
The WD 40 bath worked! I got everything loose and apart, cleaned the residual WD 40 off with some brake cleaner, then cleaned the whole mess with CLP. I took it to the range today and it shoots great.

Thanks everyone for your help.

P.S. I told my friend that if he ever gets another gun that he intends to put away for a decade, to call me and I'll give him something to treat it with.

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