"Tactical" Bolt guns???


PDA






FNFiveSeven
April 3, 2003, 07:50 PM
I was just wondering what is it that makes one type of rifle a "tactical" rifle and another rifle a "hunter/spoter" rifle. Sure, I can see the differences externally, for example the different stock styles... but what features do each rifle have that make them better suited to their respective jobs? Why can't a "tactical" rifle be perfect for hunting and vice-versa? Both rifles can be obtained with super (less than 1/2 MOA) accuracy, so that doesn't seem to be a deciding factor? Thanks for any help.

If you enjoyed reading about ""Tactical" Bolt guns???" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
BlkHawk73
April 3, 2003, 07:56 PM
"Tactical" rifles will make the owner into a "billy-bad-a$$" while those dubbed as sporters are only good for hunting. Is a little thing the business world uses. It's called marketing! For the most part the stocks are the difference. Some "tacticals" have a non-luster finish so you can hide and not give off a reflection.

Just like how owning a "magnum" is more macho than not, owning a "tactical" is more macho than a sporter.

FNFiveSeven
April 3, 2003, 09:42 PM
OK, let's assume that the main difference is the stock. What is it that you can do with a "tactical" stock that makes it better suited to "tactical shooting" that you can't do as well with a sporter stock? Why is a "tactical" stock not as good for hunting as a "sporter" stock?

Thanks again for the info.

tango3065
April 3, 2003, 09:49 PM
The bad part with most modern bolt hunting rifles is they dont have any sights, I use a scope but what if all hell ever breaks loose and u damage that scope then what?

Art Eatman
April 3, 2003, 10:26 PM
blackrazor, I've been shooting rifles longer than a lot of folks have been alive. If I knew the answer to your question I'd tell ya!

I don't have any problems with offhand shooting with my sporter; nor from a hasty rest, and certainly not from a benchrest. I dunno. Pull trigger; hammer faw-down-go-boom; stuff falls over dead-flop. Dangfino...

mastinson, after fifty-three years of using scope-sighted rifles, I've found that they get skinned up less during involuntary descents down mountains than I do. I basically fail to understand the problem. If "hell breaks loose" as in some sort of societal collapse (local or otherwise), the last thing I'm gonna do is be around hostile people within butt-stroke distance.

:D, Art

Quintin Likely
April 3, 2003, 10:41 PM
"Tactical" bolt guns...when I think of something like that, I think of something that started off as a varmint rifle...heavy barrelled, accurized (bedding and whatnot) Synthetic stock preferable, adjustible for LOP and stock weld to the eye. Usually, no iron sights fitted, at least there's none on any of my "tactical" rifles. Trigger should break cleanly, like a glass rod, preferably at 3 lbs or so.

Optics depend on what the shooting at hand is, but I'd want target turrets on mine, no coin slot adjustments, 3-10x variable or 10x fixed...what it is, it'd have to be *tough* Likewise with the rings and base, one piece Picatinney style preferred. A good sling is a must (we can even make it tactical black) bipods are optional.

Whole package (optics, scope mounts, loaded rifle) should ideally weigh no more than 15 lbs.

I don't ask for too much, do I? :D

ether
April 3, 2003, 10:45 PM
"Tactical" rifles are typically flat black, camoflage, or a combination. They also usually sport heavier-than average barrels. They usually have synthetic stocks to withstand the weather, and synthetics are usually tougher. And if "tactical" somehow translates to "hard use", then a chrome-lined bore would be the icing on the cake :)

Robert inOregon
April 3, 2003, 10:59 PM
My rifle is "tactical" because it says so right on the bolt. :neener:

amprecon
April 3, 2003, 11:20 PM
My Rem 700 in .30-06 is a combination tactical/sporter. When I have a deer in my crosshairs it's in the sporter mode, then if I ever have to put a human in the crosshairs it automatically goes into the tactical mode. Neat huh?

FNFiveSeven
April 3, 2003, 11:33 PM
Why would you not want camoflauge, synthetic stocks, and flat black anti-glare finishes on sporting guns? It certainly couldn't hurt, right? Would anyone here use a "tactical" rifle to hunt? If the answer is no, is it simply because the tactical style rifle is too heavy? Is it possible that the tactical style stock is somehow less suited for hunting? How so?

Great discussion guys, and thanks for all the feedback.

ether
April 3, 2003, 11:54 PM
"Tactical" stocks tend to be bulkier and heavier. Someone mentioned adjustible cheek pieces, adj. pull length, etc. Extras add weight. A hunting/sporting rifle needs to be relatively light and handy for field use. "Tactical" rifles are more sedentary and stable and usually don't get lugged around as much.

Edward429451
April 4, 2003, 12:15 AM
I was just wondering what is it that makes one type of rifle a "tactical" rifle and another rifle a "hunter/spoter" rifle.

Well, tactical rifles are weapons. Sporter rifles are toys.:D


Wups, wrong thread!:D :D

Sir Galahad
April 4, 2003, 12:35 AM
My Ruger M77 International HAS to be a "tactical" even though it doesn't say so on the barrel. Because Saddam Hussein has one.:D And it didn't cost extra because they didn't have to pay him for celebrity endorsement.:D And it didn't say "tatcial" on the barrel, so that shaved, oh, $1,000 off the sticker price. Those are expensive stamping tools at those factories! Why, I bet the "T" stamps in "tactical" alone adds about $250 per "T" per rifle. :D

cratz2
April 4, 2003, 10:21 AM
Another difference could be the varmint version will be blued or bright stainless steel whereas the tactical should be non-reflective matte black. Maybe an extra sling swivel for bipod use.

MLC
April 4, 2003, 12:03 PM
Alot of folks are in search of "Precision Rifles" the alternate name for the now maligned "Tactical" rifle. One can easily get the accuracy of a Remington PSS Tactical rifle at a lower price by buying a Remington Varmint(VS, VL, VSSF) or Sendero. Same rifles, different stock and finish.
A Hunter/Sporter, in terms of consistent accuracy, can't compete with the tactical or varmint class of rifles in extended target shooting due the the light weight/profile barrel and stock bedding. Not to say that sporters wont shoot tiny groups, just that their barrels heat up and change point of impact sooner.
As ether stated the varmint/tactical class is geared to more sedentary shooting.
That being said, I shall contradict myself by stating that I regularly carry my Rem 700 LTR around and shoot deer with it.
~captain"longwinded" obvious

Diesle
April 4, 2003, 01:11 PM
Black, for sure its black....

Diesle

JohnDog
April 4, 2003, 05:12 PM
Why would you not want camoflauge, synthetic stocks, and flat black anti-glare finishes on sporting guns?

Well that might be usefull if you were going to be in a full camo outfit while hunting. Out here in Colorado however, they make us wear 500+ sq. in. of blaze orange and a blaze orange hat during rifle seasons. So any advantage I might gain by having a matte black barrel or scope instead of gloss, is kinda outweighed by looking like a walking Orange Crush ad.

JohnDog

Handy
April 4, 2003, 05:23 PM
So the difference between a very accurate sporter and a tactical rifle is: you can do less with the Tac version. The sporter carries easier, is smaller, lighter and easier to shoot in all positions.



Hmmmm.

FNFiveSeven
April 4, 2003, 05:28 PM
That's what I'm trying to figure out, Handy...

TechBrute
April 4, 2003, 05:52 PM
What makes them different is what they are designed to do.

Hunting/ Sporter: Lightweight minimalist gun carried around all day and shot rarely.

Tactical: Heavy gun with scope, bipod, heavy barrel, etc. Suitable for repeat shots with minimal POI change, unsuitable for lugging around all day in the forest.

Standard Remington ADL (hunting gun): 7 pounds
Standard Remington TWS (tactical): 11 pounds

The tactical is over 50% heavier.

Sir Galahad seems to think that if it says "tactical" that affects the price. I don't really know about that. There's only a $50 difference between a 700 VS (blued) and a 700 PSS. The PSS is parkerized. On any gun, be it a long gun or handgun, a parkerized finish is generally more expensive.

I'd like someone to illustrate two similarly constructed rifles of the same brand, one tactical and one sporter, that differ greatly in price. I'm sure in most cases the prices will be very similar and any differences in pricing could probably be attributed to one of the minor differences between the two guns.

TargetShooter2
April 4, 2003, 06:47 PM
Hello,
interesting thread here ,
you can not compare a tactical rifle to a sporter they are as different as night and day . now you can call any rifle a Tac but its how its put together that makes the difference . a tac rifle will have heavy barrels either factory or aftermarket , either a trigger job or aftermarket trigger 2 to 3 1/2 lbs. heavy bases and rings , it will have a stock that will not change the POI by the elements
most of the current stocks is out of some sort of glass . so your tac rifle is really a custom rifle that is built to handle about anything that you can put it through . most if not all is sub moa
that means if that rifle is used that rifleman will be able to put his shot right where it needs to be time after time .the rifle will weigh from 10 lbs on the light side to as much as 18 lbs on the high side . the rifles use match ammo to get the most out of them , so to sum it up you can call them what ever you like Tac/ Sniper/ SPR/ bench /target / even a beanfield rifle .

i prefer to call mine TargetRifles :D :D

TS2

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid47/p993fa0a0679cac0bf9c208f75f9e7325/fcc1d576.jpg

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid52/p834f7fc5e38b7fbe34917345597ac6b8/fc988dc0.jpg

http://www.imagestation.com/picture/sraid40/pe99b59f74e8a6ae73c4aade766228a39/fcfeb871.jpg

PJR
April 4, 2003, 06:58 PM
I was just wondering what is it that makes one type of rifle a "tactical" rifle and another rifle a "hunter/sporter" rifle.

It's the shooter that makes the difference. Inanimate objects can't be tactical only people can. Therefore, calling anything tactical -- rifle, shotgun, knife, pistol, jockey shorts -- is just marketing hype.

Whether the person is skilled or competent in tactics is another matter entirely.

Paul

Sarge
April 4, 2003, 06:59 PM
just say "Ishapore Enfield", or SMLE.

QuarterBoreGunner
April 4, 2003, 07:10 PM
I'm going to see if I can further muddy the waters here; what about caliber?

I have a Weatherby Super Varmit Master, stainless Krieger barrel- fluted for cooling during sustained fire, heavy synthetic stock, Leupold VariX-III Long Range Target 6.5-20x50mm. Harris bipod. Great trigger.

Pretty ‘tactical’ so far right?

But but but… it’s in .22-250

Did I just lose my ‘tactical’ status?

Sir Galahad
April 4, 2003, 07:15 PM
TechBrute, it was a joke. You know, humor? Levity?:D

But I have seen gun shops take a heavy barrel rifle, add a Choate stock, a scope and a bipod and do, roughly, a 100% mark-up on the price of everything from rifle to accessories because the tag says "tactical" on it.

cratz2
April 4, 2003, 08:03 PM
On any gun, be it a long gun or handgun, a parkerized finish is generally more expensive.

Funny, but I've had guns parkerized for $40. Perfectly good quality job too! I've never seen anyone offer a hot blue job for $40.

Handy
April 4, 2003, 08:15 PM
Okay, if you have a "sporter" that shoots .308 into .5 MOA groups, and will fire say, 5 shots quickly without losing zero, why wouldn't that rifle be good for sniping, target shooting or other "tactical" uses?

Does a rifle have to weight 13 pounds to be stable enough to shoot really well? I've seen alot of light rifles that seem to do well for their owners without heavy anything.

BusMaster007
April 4, 2003, 09:37 PM
How 'bout a Tactical Sporter?
Remington 700 BDL 7mm Rem.Mag. / Bell&Carlson Premier Thumbhole Sporter stock / Leupold Tactical Mil-Dot 4.5-14x40 scope with really lonnnng 6" sunshade / Harris Bipod...

It's been changed since this to have the same kind of scope, only it's the 'non' Tactical version. I fogged some Krylon Satin Hunter Green onto the stock. Not much different, really, but, it doesn't look Tactical anymore...
:D

FNFiveSeven
April 4, 2003, 09:38 PM
You hit the nail on the head Handy, that's EXACTLY what I'm thinking. Now, that's not to say that there isn't some other difference between the "tactical" and the "sporter," but look at a company like HS Precision or McMillan. Both companies offer lighter rifles with "traditional" synthetic stocks they call "sporters" and heavier rifles with adjustable vertical grip stocks they call "tactical" models. But my concern is, both rifles are guaranteed to shoot sub 1/2 MOA so neither rifle is more accurate than the other... what is is about a tactical rifle that makes it's stock design and weight better for the "tactical" situation? Someone mentioned that the extra weight in the barrel allows for for more shots before heating up and losing accuracy... but my understanding is that a tactical situation rarely requires the use of multiple shots, so what's the point? Doesn't the saying go "One shot, one kill"? If it's truly one shot one kill, it seems that not only will the sporter do the job just as well, but since it weighs less and can therefore be carried further and shot offhand easier, it's actually a superior choice! Does this make sense?

ether
April 4, 2003, 09:57 PM
So it all depends on what tactics you're using :)

TechBrute
April 4, 2003, 10:30 PM
But I have seen gun shops take a heavy barrel rifle, add a Choate stock, a scope and a bipod and do, roughly, a 100% mark-up on the price of everything from rifle to accessories because the tag says "tactical" on it. Ah yes, the Mall Ninja marketing ploy... :D Don't get me started on Choate stocks. :barf:

Funny, but I've had guns parkerized for $40. Perfectly good quality job too! I've never seen anyone offer a hot blue job for $40. I'm referring to weapons that come from manufaturers new. Remington, Mossberg, Sig, Styer, etc, all cost more from the factory with parkerizing. I'm not talking about what your local economy bears for pricing.

For the record, I don't hunt. I enjoy shooting. The "tactical" rifles hold up to a 250 round day at the range much better than their tapered barrel bretheren. That's why all my rifles are heavy barreled, be it my Remington 700 rifles, or my Springfield M1A rifles. Less walking of shots.

Skullboy
April 5, 2003, 02:28 AM
Doesn't the saying go "One shot, one kill"? If it's truly one shot one kill, it seems that not only will the sporter do the job just as well, but since it weighs less and can therefore be carried further and shot offhand easier, it's actually a superior choice! Does this make sense?

The other thing you want to remember is that a lighter rifle transfers more recoil to the shooter, and has more muzzle jump, where as a heavier rifle will take the bite out of recoil, and the muzzle jump won't be as pronouced.The recoil issue would be more of a concern on the range with multiple shots, and the muzzle jump issue would be of more concern for a quick follow up shot if needed.

That being said, I hunt Moose with my back-up "Tactical" rifle, a Rem700 VS in .308win with a 20" barrel and a Leupold 4.5 X 14 - 40mm Mildot Tactical scope.Yes, it is heavier then your average sporter, but it is all that I have hunted with, and I'm used to it's weight(I don't road hunt, I actually carry it for miles in the bush).

SKBY.

Quintin Likely
April 5, 2003, 07:02 PM
...QuarterBore says...

Pretty ‘tactical’ so far right?

But but but… it’s in .22-250

Did I just lose my ‘tactical’ status?



Is it black? If so, nope, you're still plenty tactical.
:p

ShaiVong
April 5, 2003, 07:14 PM
But but but… it’s in .22-250
Did I just lose my ‘tactical’ status?


Eh? I don't want to be shot in the head by a .22-250! Those suckers can take burros down with one shot!:uhoh:

Lochaber
April 5, 2003, 08:27 PM
I am by no means an expert, but one of the questions repeated here has to do with why you would want a heavier bulkier gun that shoots just as well as the lighter handier one. Sure the heavier one doesnt heat up as much but the police marksman rarely take 25 shots in a row in the field (or I would hope they dont). There is one thing that people forget. Police snipers often end up camping on a rooftop staring at the same small target through their scopes and that gets painfull. A lot of the "features" on tactical stocks are there to make the rifle more comfortable for long periods of waiting without inducing fatigue. Personaly I also find heavier guns to be easier to balance and maintain sight picture with, particularly with a bipod.

And oh yeah, they look cool and cost more. But we all already knew that.

Loch

atek3
March 18, 2005, 01:26 PM
But but but… it’s in .22-250

depends on the bullet. 45 gr blitzking, sorry too sporty, hornady 75 gr BTHP, tactical...

atek3

Skunkabilly
March 18, 2005, 02:01 PM
Thread CPR!!! :eek:

ckyllo
March 18, 2005, 02:42 PM
how I define tactical: is black has velcro and cost twice as much. :)

Zak Smith
March 18, 2005, 02:45 PM
Instead of calling them tactical rifles, let's talk about rifles typically used by LEO/military for precision roles and rifles typically used in sniper/tactical style long range/precision competitions. Here's what they have beyond your average hunting rifle-

1. Heavier, and heavier barrel to withstand more thermal stress under rapid strings of fire

2. Higher level of accuracy, think 0.5MOA and under instead of minute of pie plate.

3. More adjustable ergonomics.

4. Optics appropriate for precise engagements of targets out to limit of the cartridge (ie, trans-sonic boundary). This generally means more magnification on average, and externally-adjustable, repeatable and return to zero elevation and windage knobs, or a specialized reticle like the Horus H25.

5. Brake and/or suppressor or suppressor attachment.

6. Generally more durable since they're regularly tested under worse conditions, and shot more.

7. Semi-auto style box magazines are more useful on a tactical/practical precision rifle.

But of course note that a long range groundhog rig has a lot of these attributes.

Can you spot the differences between a rifle designed from the ground up for military sniper duty, vs. a canonical American hunting rifle?

http://apollo.demigod.org/~zak/DigiCam/AI-AWP/small/154_5417_img.jpg (http://apollo.demigod.org/~zak/DigiCam/AI-AWP/?medium=154_5417_img.jpg)[ link to LARGER image ] (http://apollo.demigod.org/~zak/DigiCam/AI-AWP/?medium=154_5417_img.jpg)

http://www.olegvolk.net/gallery/albums/bernsteins/bill_30_06.sized.jpg
(Oleg's photo of The Rabbi's rifle, currently for sale)

bogie
March 18, 2005, 06:47 PM
When you print, paint, engrave, or otherwise place the word "Tactical," on something, you can get at least a 20% markup from the folks who just have to have "the real gear."

Sheesh.

Tell y'all what... Bring on your favorite tactical rifle, and I'll bring my favorite light varmint rifle, and we'll punch some paper at 300 yards.

Bring money.

And ferchrissake! The reason why they chrome line barrels isn't to make them shoot better. It's to make 'em keep shooting even after the grunts don't clean 'em like they should.

bogie
March 18, 2005, 06:51 PM
Oh yeah...

Fluting a barrel doesn't help that much with cooling.

Where it comes in handy is allowing a close effective cross section, and stiffness, with a significantly lighter barrel, which means less fatigue on the shooter's part.

i.e., take two barrels with an identical profile, and flute one. It won't be quite as stiff as the other one, but it'll be at least a half pound lighter.

9mmMike
March 18, 2005, 08:36 PM
Oh yeah...

Fluting a barrel doesn't help that much with cooling.

Where it comes in handy is allowing a close effective cross section, and stiffness, with a significantly lighter barrel, which means less fatigue on the shooter's part.

i.e., take two barrels with an identical profile, and flute one. It won't be quite as stiff as the other one, but it'll be at least a half pound lighter.

Then the following is a lie?

"Model 700P LTR (Light Tactical Rifle), chambered for .308 Win., .223 Rem., and .300 Rem. SA Ultra Mag.; features a slimmed down stock to improve portability and reduce weight. The flutes in the 20" LTR not only assist in weight reduction and heat dissipation, but are engineered to enhance barrel rigidity for pinpoint accuracy."

From Remington's LE Web Page on the LTR (http://www.remingtonle.com/rifles/700pltr.htm)

I am shocked.

bogie
March 18, 2005, 11:27 PM
Yeah, pretty much.

Thing is, you take a 4 pound barrel. You can have a four pound barrel that is very rigid, and 16" long, or you can have a four pound barrel that is _almost_ as rigid, and 20" long.

The fluting will theoretically help with heat dissipation, with very slightly faster cool down, but in real world use, you're not going to notice it - Because it'll also heat up slightly faster.

And yeah, I've got a Light Varmint bench gun with a fluted barrel. Came in third one day at the Supershoot. Dang fine barrel. But it's a tomato stake now.

Think of this - if fluted barrels improve accuracy, why have I NEVER seen one on an unlimited class rifle?

Oh, and I'll put two friends who happen to be "gunsmiths" against the whole damn Remington Custom Shop - Let each of 'em build a rifle, and see which is the most accurate. I'll bring money.

Zak Smith
March 18, 2005, 11:31 PM
If ultimate heat stability is your goal, flutes are probably a liability.

bogie
March 19, 2005, 01:07 AM
Yup. Faster hot, faster cool means more variation.

If someone's gonna insist on painting something black, go with something like a .223 or a .243... most "real world" tactical shots aren't over 100 yards anyway.

Zak Smith
March 19, 2005, 01:13 AM
Hey, isn't black a better blackbody radiator?
Of course, it absorbs more heat from light, too...

Sunray
March 19, 2005, 01:53 AM
"...two similarly constructed rifles of the same brand, one tactical and one sporter, that differ greatly in price..." Compare the price of a Savage 10FP-LE1 at $601.00 list price and their 11F at $486.00. The only difference is the heavy barrel on the LE1.
The term 'tactical' is a marketing term only. There's no such thing as a 'tactical' anything.

dave3006
March 19, 2005, 09:39 AM
I think a sniper hiking in the jungle/field would be better suited with my 700 ADL sporter than a 13+ lb monstrosity that is in vogue. You better have backup if you plan on banging away such that you need the bull barrel for stability.

The whole thing is a semi-good concept taken to the extreme. In WWII, snipers did not have as good a gun as an off the rack common deer rifle today with a VXIII scope. Lots of people died.

444
March 19, 2005, 10:02 AM
A tactical rifle is something between a bench rifle and a sporter rifle. It is basically what we used to call a varmint rifle only with more gadgets attached and subdued colors.

I don't get all hung up on these words like some people do. There are people on this board (and on this thread) that absolutely love to put down people that use new words. There is a word tactical. It has definite legitimate uses. Just because you don't use that word in your world doesn't take anything away from it.
The thing about this whole tactical rifle thing that I never understood is that police departments buy these heavy rifles and demand pinpoint accuracy out of them, equip them with all the latest gadgets etc. Yet the average police "sniper" shot is something like 80 yards. You could do that with anything sold at WalMart.

I got a kick out of one of Jeff Coopers columns I read somewhere within the last year. He said something like: I see Gunsite is now offering Precision Rifle classes. I didn't know there was any other kind of rifle shooting.
But, he is wrong. There is another kind of rifle shooting. That is where you are just trying to put rounds into the center of mass as quickly as you can. If you can put all your shots into an area the size of a pie plate at any given distance, that is good enough. If you are shooting tight groups, you arn't shooting fast enough. Gunsite teaches those classes also: their carbine clases. Precision rifle shoting is another story IMO. I guess it might be the difference between running and gunning as opposed to taking very careful shots from a fixed position at an extended range.

bogie
March 19, 2005, 12:18 PM
Guilty.

Tactical, schmactical... If it don't shoot where you aim it, a coat of black paint and all the carbon fiber in the world ain't gonna improve it.

And if you don't shoot enough to point it right... Methinx more than a few folks would be better served with a $400 rifle and $320 worth of ammo, than with a $700 rifle and $20 worth of ammo...

Oh, and I do have to admit that I've got a couple of rifles where I've spent $20 on ammo... One's a .300 win mag sporterized enfield, and it's sighted in, and ready for deer season. I can sight in a rifle with two shots, so I've got a bunch more...

The other's a .30-30 - same story.

Of course when I turn around, I can look at 5,000 Bart's Ultra match bullets stacked on top of the safe... Next to a few hundred rounds of .30-06 for the Garand, and a few bricks of.22s...

TechBrute
March 19, 2005, 12:18 PM
Compare the price of a Savage 10FP-LE1 at $601.00 list price and their 11F at $486.00. The only difference is the heavy barrel on the LE1. Thank you for perfectly illustrating my point. Since the 10FP has a more expensive barrel, it would make sense that it is $115 more than it's sporter brethren.

TechBrute
March 19, 2005, 12:22 PM
Oh, and another thing...

Heavy barrels exhibit less cold-shot variance than their narrow walled cohorts. Therefore, they are ideal for LEO engagments where typically only one shot is fired.

TechBrute
March 19, 2005, 12:28 PM
Hey, isn't black a better blackbody radiator?
Of course, it absorbs more heat from light, too...
That's pretty much irrelevant. The heat it absorbs from light may raise it's temperature 30 degrees or so. The heat it's dealing with from an internal explosion and the friction of a metal object being forced down its length is measured in the hundreds of degrees.

Zak Smith
March 19, 2005, 09:16 PM
The thing about this whole tactical rifle thing that I never understood is that police departments buy these heavy rifles and demand pinpoint accuracy out of them, equip them with all the latest gadgets etc. Yet the average police "sniper" shot is something like 80 yards. You could do that with anything sold at WalMart.
Ocular triangle, perhaps?

But, he is wrong. There is another kind of rifle shooting. That is where you are just trying to put rounds into the center of mass as quickly as you can.
No kidding! There's CQB-type, long-range/precision, and what I'd call practical mid-range which is out to about 400 yards at targets approx 10-15" square, and speed counts.


That's pretty much irrelevant. The heat it absorbs from light may raise it's temperature 30 degrees or so. The heat it's dealing with from an internal explosion and the friction of a metal object being forced down its length is measured in the hundreds of degrees.
Hence the part about it radiating...

-z

If you enjoyed reading about ""Tactical" Bolt guns???" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!