.22LR range?


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Alex45ACP
December 7, 2005, 07:49 PM
What's the feasible range of a .22 bullet fired from a ~20" barrel with iron sights?

I suppose it depends on the type of cartridge but no need to get specific, just wondering what an average range would be.

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AirForceShooter
December 7, 2005, 07:51 PM
the box used to say one mile.
Yeah I'm old enough to remember that

AFS

borrowedtime69
December 7, 2005, 07:57 PM
Effective range for .22 LR High Velocity on different size game:

Coyote size - 50 yards (with good shot placement)

Rabbit size - 75 yards

small ground squirrels - 100 yards

The dangerous range for .22 LR is about 1/2 mile. that far out its crawling and if you shoot flat not raised up in the air, the drop of the bullet is going to put it on the ground.

Hope this helped -Eric

pauli
December 7, 2005, 07:59 PM
all my ammo says dangerous to 1.5miles.

hey, you never know when you're going to have to fire for effect, and all you've got is a bunch of rimfire rifles ;)

Alex45ACP
December 7, 2005, 08:03 PM
I mostly meant just shooting at stationery paper targets. Like if you're an intermediate skilled rifleman, what's the maximum range would you be able to consistently hit the target at?

hartzpad
December 7, 2005, 08:33 PM
I've shot my 16" barrel Magtech .22lr rifle at 200 yards at my 6x8" steel torso target. I had to aim probably about 18"-24" high to hit it and it takes a second to get downrange, but I couldl hit it about 50% of the time with a 3-9x40 scope. For most .22lr's, I consider 125 yards about the maximum for good accuracy. Most I have shot past that distance really get thrown around in any light wind and lose major velocity.

Chuck R.
December 7, 2005, 09:24 PM
Iíve got a Ballard made repro of a Winchester Special Sporting Low-Wall rifle with a 30Ē Douglas air-gauged barrel, that I use for Silhouette practice at 100 yards.

It will usually hold 1-1.5 MOA at that distance with iron sights IF Iím watching my wind flag like a hawk. I use a MVA Schuetzen Soule rear sight that has 200 Pts (1 Pt is about 1 MOA) on it. My sight settings are:

100 Yards = 30 Pts
200 Meters = 47 Pts
300 Meters = 71 Pts

That will give you an idea of the elevation changes required.

It will routinely stay on a chicken silhouette at 200 meters, and Iíve hit quite a few pigs at 300 meters. The .22 Silhouette rams are shot at 200, and they're not impossible to hit, but they sure look small.

It really is remarkable what a good .22 with match grade ammo can do.

Chuck

MNgoldenbear
December 7, 2005, 09:54 PM
I've shot silhouette with a 10" T/C and even with cheap hunting ammo (CCI MiniMag HP), did okay at 100 yards on rams. Didn't do great, but generally 2-3 out of 5 each bank, sometimes 4. This was iron sights, but it was usually Creedmoor rather than standing.

TexasTea
December 7, 2005, 09:57 PM
I want to know as well. I shot 1" or less grouping with my .22 rifle at 50 yard. But at 100 yard I could not get any consistency out of the gun or the bullet. I used the Rem Thunderbolt .22 LR. There was some wind on that day as well. So I guess that may have something to do withe the lack of accuracy. Someone told me that at 100 yard range I need better or different .22 cartridge than what you would do well at 50 yards.

Jim Watson
December 7, 2005, 10:47 PM
200 yards is a long shot for a .22 but as Chuck likely knows, that is the range chosen for BPCR smallbore silhouette because the shots are about as difficult as with a .45-70 at 500 metres.

100 yards is a good range for general shooting with a good .22 and good ammo.

T. Tea, Remington Thunderbolt is about the WORST .22 I have ever shot, nearly anything would do better for you. Federal Lightning has a good reputation among the cheap stuff.

Roudy
December 7, 2005, 11:24 PM
I use Federal Lightning for run of the mill shooting, but if I need really accurate ammo I use Federal Gold Dot. Gold Dot is a little pricy, couple of years ago it was about 8$ for a box of 50. Then again each firearm usually has its own preference.

Also used to shoot 22LR shillouette and the standard velocity 22 ammo would do a good job of knocking down rams at 100 yds.

Darth Ruger
December 8, 2005, 12:09 AM
Sam Fadala's book "The Book of the Twenty-Two" has a section on the basics of 200-yard target shooting with rimfires, discusses trajectory, wind drift, etc.

Chuck R.
December 8, 2005, 12:12 AM
200 yards is a long shot for a .22 but as Chuck likely knows, that is the range chosen for BPCR smallbore silhouette because the shots are about as difficult as with a .45-70 at 500 metres.

Jim,

Yup your right, and my scores at .22 Silhouette about mirror my scores with the big gun.

One day we were just playing and shooting ďthroughĒ the wind and it was amazing how that little .22 acted just like a big BPCR.

Itís awesome practice for both shooting and spotting.

Chuck

wanderinwalker
December 8, 2005, 09:19 AM
I find with a Walther KK100 shooting your standard target-grade ammo, 100 yards is about the maximum range. Those tiny little 50-yard clusters get noticeably larger at 100 yards. Not just 2x the size; more like 3x the size for me! :banghead: And that is using iron sights.

IIRC, the elevation difference between 50 and 100 yards on that rifle is 60 clicks up. At 1/8-minute per click, that works out to 7.5" of drop. I'm content not to think of the wind drift.

Carl N. Brown
December 8, 2005, 04:18 PM
I have "dinged" the metal silhouette target at 200 meters at
or local range fairly consistently with .22 rifle (drop is about
four feet, target is about 18 inches). C.S. Landis wrote about
killing a woodchuck at 175 yards with a .22 but considered
that a lucky kill.

For practical humane hunting and varmint control using a .22
rifle and iron sights, 50 to 75 yards should be considered max.

At four hundred yards, a .22 long rifle will not penetrate a
steel bucket (but it could still put your eye out kid.) And plunging
fire from one mile to a mile-and-a-half would be at least as
damaging as hail and could really peeve someone off at the
receiving end. Good way to create bad feelings toward shooters.

Before firing a .22 rifle be sure of your backstop. It is capable,
under some circumstances of causing damage further out than
you might realize.

MachIVshooter
December 9, 2005, 12:37 AM
I find with a Walther KK100 shooting your standard target-grade ammo, 100 yards is about the maximum range. Those tiny little 50-yard clusters get noticeably larger at 100 yards. Not just 2x the size; more like 3x the size for me! :banghead: And that is using iron sights.



I have heard from several gunsmiths that it is virtualy impossible to get .22 LR to hold sub-MOA at 100 yards. The explanation (as given to me) is that there is some phenomenon that occurs when these bullets transcend from supersonic to subsonic. I have never really researched it, but I trust these 'smiths, as they have been building precision guns for many years.

As to the effective range of .22 LR, as a small game round shots are best kept to under 100 yards. However, I have killed praire dogs with high velocity .22 shorts as far as 273 yards (yeah, I had to hold about 6 feet over them and luck played a large part!). For each hit at that range, I probably fired over a dozen shots and used artillery-style windage and elevation (puff of dust is two feet left, 1 foot short). This was done using a Marlin model 81g bolt action with 4x Burris. Ranging was with my Bushnell yardage-pro 800. And not all the 'dogs died (at least not before they got down their holes).

cracked butt
December 9, 2005, 08:35 PM
Longest shots I've taken were prone at 270 yards with a .22 at a 12 inch gong. Can hit the gong every time at range as soon as I get the elevation figured out and if the crosswinds aren't too severe. The .22lr drops very fast after about 130 yards.

rockstar.esq
December 10, 2005, 03:26 AM
I have heard from several gunsmiths that it is virtualy impossible to get .22 LR to hold sub-MOA at 100 yards. The explanation (as given to me) is that there is some phenomenon that occurs when these bullets transcend from supersonic to subsonic. I have never really researched it, but I trust these 'smiths, as they have been building precision guns for many years.

The transonic boundary is the distance where the bullet slows to below the speed of sound. When this happens the sonic boom following the bullet catches up and blasts past it. The effect is somewhat similar a jet flyover blowing your hair back. As a result the bullet get's tossed about a little causing less than great accuracy. For this reason, Aguila makes a sub sonic sniper round that starts off slower than sound (no sonic boom follows it) but it uses a fairly heavy bullet to retain energy which allows it to reach farther. I have been able to make a first try shot at 350yds using this ammo in a 5in Browning buckmark. I can usually empty all nine shots out of my Hi Standard revolver into the 340yd target. Bear in mind that I'm simply trying to hit a standing hunk of aluminum that measures a good 18" by 36". The pig, chicken and ram targets mentioned above are considerably smaller and make much harder targets even at closer ranges.

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