Mil-Spec 1911


PDA






USMC Tanker
December 8, 2005, 03:17 PM
I'm going to be buying a 1911 soon and was considering buying one of the Dan Daly models. However, a lot of people have been saying that I should start out with a basic mil-spec 1911 and upgrade to my custom needs. So what mil-spec 1911s do you all recommend? I like the Springfield Armory GI and Mil Spec but have heard some problems about quality control, I've heard the same for Auto-Ordnance. I like the idea of something like the SA GI (starting out BASE, parkerized, etc) and turning it into a true CUSTOM gun, but I've heard so many mixed reviews about that weapon.

If you enjoyed reading about "Mil-Spec 1911" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
R.H. Lee
December 8, 2005, 03:19 PM
Never heard of 'Dan Daly', but the SA Milspec is a good way to go. I wouldn't bother with the GI model, tiny sights, tight ejection port.

deker
December 8, 2005, 03:30 PM
Do you by chance mean "Charles Daly"? I've never shot one, but I've fondled a couple and they look like they're decently built.

Another option to check out would be a Rock Island Armory 1911. They're nicely built, shoot well (well, the one I've played with anyways), and you can't beat the price.

If, on the other hand you meant "Dan Wesson" I can't say enough good about them. They don't make a milspec version, but I didn't let that hold me back. I've got 2 in the house now (though one has to stay under the tree until Christmas...:banghead: )

-d

Edgeofthewoods
December 8, 2005, 03:32 PM
Depends on what you want. I carry a SA GI on a daily bases. Never a problem that wasn't my fault. Yup it has GI sights and the original ejection port but St John designed it that way and , well it works. The Milspec has a wider grip safety, threedot sights and a lowered e port. both are outsanding weapons as they come out of the box. You should be happy with either one.

Chuck

USMC Tanker
December 8, 2005, 03:35 PM
Yeah, sorry I meant Charles Daly...was thinkin' about something else...:banghead:

Black Majik
December 8, 2005, 03:59 PM
Theres Dan Wesson and Charles Daly.

Of the two I'd go for Dan Wesson. Check out the 1911forum if you get the chance, theres NUMEROUS info based on make/brand.

Of course, I've never owned a CD 1911, but I'd steer clear of that brand. For around that price range there are other 1911s that I'd rather own.

If you can, and you're looking into a mil-spec 1911, check out the Springfield GI. :)


Also:

Rock Island > Charles Daly.

:)

Azrael256
December 8, 2005, 05:56 PM
Another option to check out would be a Rock Island Armory 1911. Never shot one, have only seen them, but I have heard people speak with dismay about the cast slide. It seemed like a decent pistol if you're just getting into 1911s and want something cheap to play with.

I got my education in 1911s from 1911Tuner's thorough review and upgrade guide to the Springfield. It's all right here (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=81964) if you're interested.

MatthewVanitas
December 8, 2005, 06:55 PM
http://www.medalofhonor.com/CHINAMARINE1.jpg

This is Dan Daly, different guy entirely.

http://www.medalofhonor.com/Marines_in_Peking.jpg

Regarding the Springfield GI: if you want a no-frills 1911, I'd go for that. Then you can shoot it for a while, so when you're ready to spring for a high-speed 1911 with all the options, you'll know exactly what you're looking for. And there's a good chance you'll be perfectly satisfied with the no-frills, and save yourself a few C-notes.

Plus the SA GI probably has a pretty good resale value if you decide to sell when you upgrade. A generic-brand like CD or RI doesn't have the same reputation.


I have a Sistema Colt 1911, which has basically the same features, old-school sights, etc., and I don't find it any major disadvantage for plinking and IDPA. I keep thinking of buying some $900 Kimber with modern features, but my old mil-spec does everything I want it to do, and cost me barely $300.

So, count me as a vote for buying an SA GI if you can find it around $399 or so. I've seen them at that price even in California.

-MV

USMC Tanker
December 8, 2005, 07:31 PM
Yeah, thanks, I'm a Marine so I know who Dan Daly is. Which is why I accidentally put "Dan" instead of "Charles" for the last name "Daly"

MDG1976
December 8, 2005, 07:46 PM
However, a lot of people have been saying that I should start out with a basic mil-spec 1911 and upgrade to my custom needs

DO NOT DO THIS! You'll spend way more doing this than buying a "decent" gun to begin with.

MatthewVanitas
December 8, 2005, 07:50 PM
Totally understandable, not taking a cheap-shot at you.

It's just that as soon as I read the post I thought "... and Smedley Butler." It's just interesting how all the little pieces float around in the brain.



In all seriousness though, the GI is a good deal, and gives you something to shoot while pondering your next move. You could conceivably buy all kinds of high-speed stuff to upgrade it, but you'd probably get more bang for your buck by saving up for a high-end 1911 with all the trimmings a few years down the road. By that time, you should be a dang good shot with the GI.

A $399 1911 with $300 of home upgrades is still worth less than it was new, and quite possibly worth less than it would be if you hadn't started upgrading it.

Take care, -MV

MDG1976
December 8, 2005, 07:52 PM
A $399 1911 with $300 of home upgrades is still worth less than it was new, and quite possibly worth less than it would be if you hadn't started upgrading it.

Yep. Save up and by a nicer gun to start.

MrAcheson
December 10, 2005, 04:29 PM
There are three ways to go with a 1911. (1) Buy milspec and build up. (2) Buy Kimber, Springfield Loaded, etc. and leave it alone. (3) Spend big bucks for big name semi-custom.

I'm going to play devil's advocate and suggest you do what you planned, buy a good GI gun to serve as a base, then build up.

In the end it will cost you more than a Kimber, but you will probably have a better gun too. With the build route, you know the origin of all the parts that go into your gun. You know where they came from and what they are made out of. If you use a good local smith, you will probably come out with a gun of equivalent quality to the expensive pistols but will have spent much less than a big name gun.

I'm going the cheap build route. My milspec is reliable and accurate. I put new grips on. I'll probably bob the spur hammer soon because it bites some peoples hands. At some point it'll have to be refinished because parking tends to wear poorly. In the end I'll have the gun I want and still be in for less than a kimber.

Oh and if you intend to shoot your guns, then don't go planning on using it as investment piece too. Investment wise, guns are far more like cars than like houses. The big $ guns are big $ because they are rare and barely used. Just shoot it and enjoy.

Valkman
December 10, 2005, 04:45 PM
If you have any desire to learn about working on 1911's the Mil-Spec is a great way to go. It's a great gun to start out with, so I added a beavertail grip safety, extended thumb safety, new trigger and all new insides but kept the original barrel. It is a sweet shooter. :)

NVMM
December 10, 2005, 04:51 PM
DO NOT DO THIS! You'll spend way more doing this than buying a "decent" gun to begin with.

A Big Plus One!

f4t9r
December 10, 2005, 06:59 PM
Yep. Save up and by a nicer gun to start.

I would agree

1911 guy
December 10, 2005, 08:01 PM
I've got two of them. My only gripe is one does not feed HP's. The other feeds HP's and ball just fine and is my carry pistol. For under 400 bucks you can get a well made 1911 with ambi safety, beavertail grip safety, beveled mag well, commander style hammer, flared and lowered ejection port and Novak style sights. Are there better pistols out there? Sure. Are there better pistols for a base model 1911? Probably not.

Walter
December 11, 2005, 01:37 AM
Marine,
Based on my experience, I would steer clear of any Auto-Ordnance
1911s. I bought one new, and it looked good, but it jammed like it
was made to.
After a lot of honing, filing, and even a little Dremel tool work,
it finally shoots good. But I shouldn't have had to do the
gunsmith work to a brand new gun. And I'm not bad-mouthing
Auto-Ordnance behind their back. I sent them a blistering letter
regarding their quality control. They sent me back a half-assed
apology and a Thompson patch.

Semper Fi,

Walter
Lima 3/26 RVN 69/70

el44vaquero
December 11, 2005, 03:15 AM
If you are planning on keeping the gun and not trying to sell it, build your own. It's not cost effective, but you'll have something you made. It's just like restoring classic cars. You'll never get your money back out of the, but it's something you love and made with your own hands. Guns are about the love behind them, and not to make money. Find one that makes you happy and build her up.

Azrael256
December 11, 2005, 04:34 AM
+1
My decision in the area has far more to do with learning than any kind of monetary cost/value equation.

3006mv
December 25, 2005, 09:58 PM
I agree w/ the sentiments about building up and learning. Hey you may find you even have a new skill and the knowledge, experience, and for lack of a better word, pride or esteem you get out of it is truly priceless. Plus you can pick and choose things that you like or need as opposed to parts slapped onto higher priced guns that you won't necessarily need, like ambi safeties or whatever. And it would be unique no other one like it. It IS like making a custom car. Imagine if people being people didn't do things like that, it would cost our economy millions and maybe put gun parts mfg.s out of business. An RIA "before picture" from their catalog http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a99/3006mv/Rock20Island.jpg my RIA GI Milspec FSP after a little tweaking http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a99/3006mv/PB150007.jpg

If you enjoyed reading about "Mil-Spec 1911" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!