"Low velocity bullet" = "ricochet around in skull" stupid myth


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Godfather
December 11, 2005, 09:24 AM
A while ago, I saw a Kojak (new) episode, where there was this serial sniper who was using a .308 . According to the show, he used a silencer so that the supersonic crack would come from "90 degrees in the wrong direction". They also said he was handloading the bullets with less powder, not to make his silencer actually work, but so the lower velocity bullet would "bounce around" in the guy's skull "turning his brains to soup".

I thought that this was just localized stupidity till I picked up the TV Guide this week. Flipping through, trying desperately to find that actual TV listings (and noticing the chick with the Beretta on page 18), I spotted a photo of a .22 LR bullet, up close. The caption read ".22 Caliber. The hit man's ammo of choice, according to CSI medical examiner... The bullet's low weight allows slugs to ricochet around in the skull, thereby inflicting maximum tissue damage."

Am I wrong, or is this all asinine? A headshot is a headshot, right?

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armoredman
December 11, 2005, 09:28 AM
Hollywood, the home of the 15 shot revolver, the silenced revolver, the 150 yard one shot stop head shot with a snub 32, etc. Hollywood is entertainment, nothing more....sometimes pretty vapid entertainment, at that.

Preacherman
December 11, 2005, 09:33 AM
It only works on TV scriptwriters and directors. They have incredibly thick skulls and minimal brain tissue, so the bullet can bounce around inside their heads ad infinitum.

bogie
December 11, 2005, 10:41 AM
FWIW, slower small-caliber bullets have been known to hit a head, and then travel completely _around_ the skull, under the skin, and later get dug out.

Kurush
December 11, 2005, 01:17 PM
According to the show, he used a silencer so that the supersonic crack would come from "90 degrees in the wrong direction".Wow a ventriliquist silencer, I gotta get me one of those :p

k_dawg
December 11, 2005, 02:58 PM
lol.. as if a full-load .308 to the head wouldn't kill the person outright...

mete
December 11, 2005, 03:18 PM
The 22LR is notorious for being deflected in the body. The Pres Reagan shooting is an example the 22 bullet entered the chest , bounced off a rib and punctured a lung. I had a 22 deflect 45* in a woodchuck. ...In a suicide attempt with a 380 , a man in this area had the bullet go through the skin and go around between the skin and muscle wall.This type of thing has happened with dangerous game such as elephants where the bullet [things like a 458 Mag ] go between the skin and skull !And many a man was saved because the bullet was deflected by the hard rounded skull .

BOBE
December 11, 2005, 03:24 PM
Let's not forget that TV and Movies by their very definition is fiction.
Some are more blatant than others in their content. I don't watch all the alphabet named crime shows because I can't keep the plot in mind for all the technical inaccuracies.

nfl1990
December 11, 2005, 03:27 PM
The caption read ".22 Caliber. The hit man's ammo of choice, according to CSI medical examiner... The bullet's low weight allows slugs to ricochet around in the skull, thereby inflicting maximum tissue damage."

I have heard that a .22lr will bounce around in someone's chest, this was from a Secret Service agent who had been on Pres. Reagan's detail, and was talking about the shooting, and why the shooter used a .22 instead of something larger.

XLMiguel
December 11, 2005, 04:22 PM
It only works on TV scriptwriters and directors. They have incredibly thick skulls and minimal brain tissue, so the bullet can bounce around inside their heads ad infinitum.
And furthermore, since there's "minimal brain tissue" to be damaged, it's hard to measure, let alone percieve, any actual brain damage or after-effects of shooting a TV scriptwriter/director in the head . . . this explains alot:evil: :neener:

carebear
December 11, 2005, 04:26 PM
John Hinckley Jr. exited a bus in Washington, D.C. and checked into the Park Central Hotel on March 29, 1981. On March 30, 1981, President Ronald gave a luncheon speech to 3,500 AFL-CIO union delegates at a Washington, D.C. Hilton. Hinckley, standing among a crowd of onlookers outside the hotel, fired six shoots, exploding Devastator bullets, at President Reagan as he left the hotel surrounded by staff, Secret Service agents, and police officers. The gunfire hit President Reagan, police officer Tom Delahanty, Secret Service agent Tim McCarthy, and Press Secretary James Brady. The bullet that struck President Reagan malfunctioned, failing to explode on contact.

This from the police report in the archives. Anybody familiar with the "Devastator"? :rolleyes:

LaEscopeta
December 11, 2005, 04:58 PM
I’ve heard the deal with hit men using small caliber, low power handguns is the round enters the skull but there is a good chance it won’t exit. Apparently this is important if you are shooting a guy in your own car, or in the back of your “social club.” No exit wound means less mess (also known as evidence) to clean up. Also the report is less likely to be heard, especially if it is fired inside. I’ve never heard or believe the bounce-around-inside-the-skull bit.

If I recall correctly, the round that hit James Brady (Reagan’s Press Secretary, shot when Reagan was shot, along with 2 L.E.O.s) in the head was a .25 caliber revolver round, and it did not exit. I guess if you get head shot, and are rushed to a hospital by the secret service, you can survive. If are Unlucky Luciano, and you get head shot in the back of the Ravanite Social Club, you get wrapped in plastic and driven in the trunk of a Lincoln to a construction site in Jersey, where you get buried in the foundation, weather you survive the head shot to not.

I’ve also heard Canada has outlawed small caliber handguns, because of their constant use by good fellas up on “fishing trips” from Chicago.

carebear
December 11, 2005, 05:08 PM
Sorry, I didn't paste in that part of the report. The revolver Hinckley used was an RG .22 LR revolver.

mbs357
December 11, 2005, 05:17 PM
the silenced revolver

http://world.guns.ru/handguns/hg102-e.htm

On the other hand, M1895 had some unusual and interesting features, one of which was gas sealed cylinder, which made the Nagant a rare example of revolver suitable for mounting a silencer.

;D

Not saying that every revolver that's supressed in movies are the Nagant, but it is possible to silence one...maybe just this one, though. :D

armoredman
December 11, 2005, 05:58 PM
The Devastator was a goofy trick bullet I fell for, when I first started carrying - JHP ammo with primers pressed in the cavity, and powder in the cavity under the reversed primer. Theory was, impact would fire the primer, cause the powder to explode, thus spreading the JHP to instant ful expansion. truth, very faulty, about 50% failure rate, and the ones that worked, (that I tried), did not impress me with expansion, in the wet phone books we tried them in. I haven't seen those things for 20 years or so.
I carried 10 of them in an Astra A-80...first10, then 5 JHP. Good thing I never used them in a SD shooting!

carebear
December 11, 2005, 06:02 PM
Primers in bullets? Yargh! :uhoh:

I'll stick with my standard JHP's.

Hkmp5sd
December 11, 2005, 06:08 PM
Wow a ventriliquist silencer, I gotta get me one of those
That is the purpose of a suppressor on a rilfe that shoots a supersonic bullet. The suppressor masks the sound of the bullet being fired. The only sound heard is the sonic crack of the bullet, which tends to make the bullet appear to be fired 90 degrees from the actual shooter's location.

mbs357
December 11, 2005, 06:11 PM
Which is the purpose of subsonic ammo, right?
(To prevent the mini sonic boom?)

444
December 11, 2005, 06:30 PM
The thing I always found amusing about these "bullets bouncing around" statements is the fact that a round like a .22 has very marginal penetration to begin with. Yet, we are expected to believe that it not only penetrates but it has enough horse power left to bounce around (more penetration). Now we are hearing about bullets "bouncing around" in the chest: what are they bouncing off of ? The ribs ? So, a .22 has enough penetration to penetrate the chest completely then richochet off the ribs on the opposite side of the chest, bounce off and continue to travel with the implication that this happens more than once ?

There are several "purposes" of suppressors on a rifle that shoots a supersonic bullet. One of them is that the rifle is about as loud as a .22LR when using it.

I wouldn't laugh too hard at the stuff you see on TV. I read stuff on this board on a daily basis that is just as ridiculous. Some of it is repeated over and over and I see it ever few days.

El Tejon
December 11, 2005, 06:31 PM
Inside the skull? Have never seen it.

Ricocheting around the outside of the skull? Have seen it a few times. All pistol bullets of minor caliber--a .32, a .25 and a .380 [the .380 creased the guy's skull in a straight line though].

Happens like this: Ray-ray and Ice Dawg doing bidness in parking lot. Both are nervous and bouncing up and down and throwing their heads side to side as they speak with their hands [thus usually drawing attention from witnesses--always a real good idea].

"Yo, yo, yo, dog, we gonna do this thang."
"Yo, yo, yo, dog, I gots what you needs here [produces pistol sideways and empties gun blindly]."

As the target's head is usually in motion and the pistol itself is being waved about [in a flicking manner as witnesses describe it], bullets have not penetrated but "bounced off" at angle.

kentucky_smith
December 11, 2005, 06:48 PM
We had a lady come in to the high school I teach at to talk about a high school shooting incident in Paducah, Ky. 10 shots with a .22 pistol killed 3 people, wounded 5 more including this girl, making this girl a paraplegic. Supposedly the single .22 bullet she was shot with ricocheted around her rib cage, puncturing a lung and lodged in her spine.

A member of my community was killed when I was about 16 with a .22 in an attempted robbery.

wingnutx
December 11, 2005, 08:50 PM
Hollywood, the home of the 15 shot revolver, the silenced revolver,

Ever see "The Villian"?

Ahnuld carries a "seven shot six-shooter". '

R.H. Lee
December 11, 2005, 09:00 PM
Talk to a doctor who has done autopsies, or a mortician who has attended autopsies and see if you still think it's a joke. A .22lr will/can do the same thing inside a ribcage.

R.W.Dale
December 11, 2005, 09:14 PM
I think that you guys are over thinking this. I can believe that something such as low powered as a handgun round COULD fail to penatrate in rare cases.After all the human skull is basically a hard sphere so an off center "hit" to that sphere could deflect the bullet. I've seen high powered rifle bullets hit all kinds of things and yet fail to penatrate ( Most cases involving a combination Hillbillies,Bush beer' Whitetail deer and various pieces of automotive sheetmetal.)

History Nut
December 11, 2005, 09:23 PM
Regarding bullets 'bouncing around inside the skull' I have seen a lot of X-Ray films with a bullet intact or fragmented inside a skull. Most of the time, they were approximately opposite the point of entry. Whether they 'bounced around' could only be determined by autopsy. Since I wasn't involved in the cases at that point, I don't know what might have been determined. A bullet cracking through the front of a skull (somewhat thicker than some other areas) will shed a fair amount of energy. It might shed enough to not be able to exit the opposite wall but have enough left over for a kind of rebound. Kind of like when a bullet bounces back at a shooter off a metal plate target. It would be shedding energy quickly as it is trying to make way in a fairly thick fluid-like medium. So a 'bouncing bullet' is a possibility. If anyone has access to autopsy reports of head wounds, they could enlighten us all with facts instead of suppositions.

Since there is at least an 'urban myth' regarding .22LR bullets in the head, they might be preferred based on that alone and not actual established fact.

I agree that TV is not a medium that is reliable for facts especially regarding firearms. Writers don't worry about facts if they get in the way of the 'drama'. My personal opinion is that they don't respect the audience to know anything so don't even try to get it right.

Shel
December 11, 2005, 11:24 PM
I saw this same article in TV Guide magazine. I wondered the same thing. I will be the first to admit I don't know a lot about guns. I remember something about they sayd "it was the hitmen's calliber of choice".

Onmilo
December 12, 2005, 08:47 AM
I have seen the autopsy photos of a young man who commited suicide by firing a .22 LR bullet into the roof of his mouth from a Marlin Model 60 rifle.
The bullet went into the brain, traveled at an upward and to the rear angle, hit the back of the skull, ricocheted to the right side, again the bullet ricocheted to the left side and exited just to the front of the left ear canal.

When the kids brain was sectioned and viewed from the top, it looked like the bullet had cut a near perfect X into his brain.

Poor kid and yes things such as this can and do happen.

Dain Bramage
December 12, 2005, 09:44 AM
From MY BLUE HEAVEN:

Vinnie (Steve Martin): "Richie loved to use 22s because the bullets are small and they don't come out the other end like a 45, see, a 45 will blow a barn door out the back of your head and there's a lot of dry cleaning involved, but a 22 will just rattle around like Pac-Man until you're dead."

50caliber123
December 12, 2005, 09:59 AM
the TV guide article with the caption about how a .22 is "the weapon of choice for hitmen" sounds like an anti-gun ploy to me. When I was a kid, we all strted with .22's. Way to scare our Mom's, Hollywood!:cuss:

Godfather
December 12, 2005, 08:15 PM
I do know that bullets will bounce some in the head, especially low velocity handgun bullets, I studied forensic science for a few years. But I just didn't think the bullet bouncing would make it more likely to kill you (obviously the "brain to soup" bit is hookah), or that "hitmen" would do that inentionally.

scubie02
December 12, 2005, 09:37 PM
actually, the 22 stereotype is true, and they can ricochet around as mentioned.

Dionysusigma
December 12, 2005, 09:55 PM
My (admittedly rather sick) story... I have not confirmed this, but *cough* someone I know who is a coroner told me about this.

BG robs a convenience store with a knife. BG leaves, finds police in the parking lot, guns drawn. Despite common sense and warnings from police officers, BG approahes the cops. One officer, one shot, one .45 ACP hitting the BG's forehead at a "funny angle". BG dies instantaneously.

Now, for the official report, it was not a "clean" head shot. The trajectory of the 230gr FMJ pierced the man's skull, but the curved walls of the brain cavity caused the bullet to go 'round and 'round, effectively liquefying the brain of the BG. By the time the body had arrived at the morgue, the brain had re-coagulated into what was described as a "grayish-red substance reminiscent of Jell-O with bananas." :scrutiny: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf:

Bullets do weird things sometimes. :uhoh:

X Who
December 12, 2005, 10:22 PM
Loading down 308 ammo to get the bullet to bounce around in the head seems silly to me. I once exploded a jackrabbit with a 110 gr. JHP from a 308.:eek: A head shot at any decent range with that load would blow most of the brains out the backside of the skull (what a mess). A head shot with any other full-power 308 load would be lethal.

Maybe there is a grain of truth (given the .22 bounce) to the TV show, but it still does not make real sense.

twoblink
December 13, 2005, 01:20 AM
Well, we all know if the .44Mag hit you in the pinky, it's so powerful that it'd spin you around!!

Chow Yung Fat carries a 1911 that has 400+ rounds..

Then again you can stick a gun in your mouth, pull the trigger, and only blow out your cheek.. Never mind the violent expansion of air in your mouth should should have turned your bottom jaw and your throat into soup...

These are catagorically "Hollywood laws of physics".

Strings
December 13, 2005, 01:40 AM
I tend to believe the ".22 leaves a small entrance hole, and no exit" idea. And evrything *I* have ever heard about mob hitmen was that they prefered it for that reason: small entrance, no exit, less mess to clean...

Thefabulousfink
December 13, 2005, 02:18 AM
As far as Hitmen favoring the .22 cal, I have heard of the CIA and other agencies favoring small caliber, silenced weapons during the Cold War including the Ruger Mark II with integral silencer, and the Welrod pistol (.32 acp). These weapons were extremly silent (esp the Welrod which was bolt-action) and used to eliminate targets at close range.

As for skull bouncing, I would imagine that there is a small window of velocity that would give a bullet enough energy to pierce the skull, continue through the brain tissue, and have just the right amount of energy to strike the far side, bounce off, but not break through.

From what I know, most .22's have a hard time even piercing the skull and to do so require a combination of shot placement, high velocity (i.e. rifle), or a hardend bullet.

Jim K
December 13, 2005, 01:11 PM
Many years ago there was a report of a shooting in Washington, DC, where a bullet from a .45 caliber automatic (it could only have been .45ACP at that time) entered the front of a man's skull, travelled around inside the skull and lodged under the skin at the rear of the neck. Not only was the shot not fatal, but the man reported only a mild headache.

I don't know the medical details, but I have no real reason to doubt the story, which appeared in several newspapers at the time. I once asked a doctor if such a thing was possible, and he said that it was possible, but really unlikely (which I already knew). He said the brain has a rather tough covering called dura matter, which is flexible enough to be pushed out of the way by a (relatively) slow moving projectile, and that a bullet could force its way between the skull and the dura matter without damaging the brain.

It seems we are tougher than we think we are.

Jim

Strings
December 13, 2005, 05:24 PM
See ever'body? The .45 just ain't enough gun! :neener:

JMusic
December 23, 2005, 04:41 PM
When a bullet "any bullet" hits an object they can and do some funny things. It is unpredictable ,do to bullet size, velocity, substrate, and angle. I saw an autopsy of a woman who had been shot 5 times. Some bullets ran fairly straight routes others ran multiple angles. I saw a man who had committed suicide by sticking a 44 mag in his mouth and pulling the trigger. Most of his brain bounced off the ceiling in his garage and then slid across the floor about 15 ft. Maybe there is something to this ricochet thing.:)
Jim

Jayb
December 23, 2005, 05:12 PM
First hand ecperience with .22 cal ricochets......

As an EMT, I was dispatched to a home invasion scene with gunshot wounds. Three guys and a female broke into a home and assaulted the wife, sleeping on the couch. Hubby wakes up, grabs a tube fed Marlin .22 (15 rounds), and empties it at the four. We took all four to the hospital where they remained in critical/serious condition for three and a half weeks. All four had multiple organ damage, which was caused by three wounds on two peersons, and 4 wounds on the female and the other male. One tire on the get-away vehicle was flattened by a round. When we arrived at the home, the husband was sitting at the kitchen table with a knife wound to his side, calmly reloading the rifle. To brush off the damage potential of the .22 cal round would seem somewhat arrogant to me. Especially after seeing what can happen.

For what it's worth,

Jay

edit....... re: the title of this thread, I have no first hand knowledge of inter-skull ricochets..

jtward01
December 23, 2005, 06:02 PM
The thing I always found amusing about these "bullets bouncing around" statements is the fact that a round like a .22 has very marginal penetration to begin with. Yet, we are expected to believe that it not only penetrates but it has enough horse power left to bounce around (more penetration). Now we are hearing about bullets "bouncing around" in the chest: what are they bouncing off of ? The ribs ? So, a .22 has enough penetration to penetrate the chest completely then richochet off the ribs on the opposite side of the chest, bounce off and continue to travel with the implication that this happens more than once ?

I was a paramedic for almost 15 years and worked a lot of shootings. In one case a man was shot in the shoulder with a .22LR rifle and died almost immediately. In another a young woman was shot in the head with a .22 Short handgun and wasn't seriously injured.

In the first case the man's ex-wife deliberately aimed for his shoulder at a range of about 15 feet because she didn't want to kill him, only stop him from beating her again, which is what he was threatening at the time she fired. The bullet entered the shoulder, deflected off the shoulder blade, traveled across his chest puncturing his aorta and ended up just under the skin on the opposite shoulder.

The girl shot herself, attempting suicide. The slug bounced off her skull and was laying on the living room floor when we arrived. X-rays later showed hairline skull fractures radiating from the point of impact, but no serious injury. She was kept in the hospital for psychiatric treatment.

Overall I probably worked 20 or 30 shootings, maybe a few more. Every one is different. I've seen people shot with .44s that bled very little externally, and others shot with .32s that bled all over the place. I saw a guy shot nine times with a .22WMR who walked to the ambulance, and another shot once with a .25acp who was dead before he hit the ground.

One of the most amazing was a guy who was wanted for killing a police officer during a bank robbery. When the cops knocked on the motel room door he made the mistake of looking through the peephole. He caught a load of 00 buck square in the chest (this was back in the early 70s when things were done a bit differently than today). When we went into the room both shoes and one sock were in front of the door where he'd been standing. The other stock was still on his foot. He'd literally been knocked out of his shoes by the blast.

jjohnson
August 2, 2006, 03:17 PM
Oh, please. :barf:

Remember, you don't watch TV to get technical information about shooting, reloading, handloading, right? Right? :fire:

Sure, a bullet can kinda take a bounce here and there given particular angles, speeds, and taking into consideration what it's gone through before... but that's all incidental. There's a couple of camps who'll still debate killing power in terms of (1) penetration of vitals regardless of what bullet is used,
(2) hydrostatic shock theory (3) exotic stuff like garlic in hollowpoints to cause blood poisoning (4) voodoo and (5) things even more strange. Very few believe the idea of putting a bullet into somebody's head is to cause death by the pingpong effect. :banghead:

There's some very well credentialed ballisticians and medical doctors who write about forensics that read this forum. Go THERE for technical info on killing and leave the TV to its job - entertainment, not education. :D

Taurus 66
August 2, 2006, 03:45 PM
If you saw it on TV, it has to be true. :rolleyes:

Dr.Rob
August 2, 2006, 03:52 PM
It's TV... Caveat Emptor.

A really good at 'TV" is watching 'CSI' vs. Watching 'The First 48' where real cops and criminalists catch real bad guys... funny their offices don't look like they were designed by Michael Mann and if it's dark they usually wait until morning to do a search so they don't miss anything.

.22's can bounce, but I wouldn't count on it.

Sawdust
August 2, 2006, 04:10 PM
Mmmmmm...jello...

Sawdust

Lupinus
August 2, 2006, 04:13 PM
uhm

if you get hit in the head with a 308 I do believe that not only is your brain gonna be soup already but there also isn't going to be much of a soup bowl left

JesseJames
August 2, 2006, 04:28 PM
I recall seeing a police video of a hostage standoff. A guy had a woman in a headlock with a gun to her head.
A police sniper had him in his sights. He took the shot and most likely hit him with a .308 round.
They blurred the impact to the gunmans head but there was a HUGE splash of blood and I guess brain matter that flew out where his head was.
I am positive a good portion of his cranium was pulverized.

I would never look to entertainment for anything factual about firearms. The range, the field, and books are for finding the facts.

LanEvo`
August 2, 2006, 04:51 PM
I tend to believe the ".22 leaves a small entrance hole, and no exit" idea. And evrything *I* have ever heard about mob hitmen was that they prefered it for that reason: small entrance, no exit, less mess to clean...I always figured that hitmen would use a .22LR because it's relatively quiet. On top of that, it's easy to silence. And most states don't make you hand over your FID when you buy rimfire ammo (unlike centerfire).

When you put all that together, the 22LR seems like a reasonable choice. But what do I know?

Odd Job
August 2, 2006, 06:12 PM
If you guys have a serious interest in gunshot wounds you should read Vincent J.M. Di Maio's book 'Gunshot Wounds.'

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0849381630/103-9243537-9945401?v=glance&n=283155

In Di Maio's book, Chapter 9 deals with 'Bloody Bodies and Bloody Scenes.'
Di Maio noted that of 185 cases of suicide by .22, only 20% of those bullets exited. Of 60 cases of homicide by .22 only 6.6% exited. These figures are from gunshot heads only. He further adds: "...of the bullets that do not exit the head, the vast majority are retained in the cranial cavity. Thus, internal ricochet is fairly common, occurring in anywhere from 10 to 15% of the cases..." (See page 264 and 265)

Also, you can give Malcolm Dodd's book 'Terminal Ballistics' a read:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0849335779/103-9243537-9945401?v=glance&n=283155

In Dodd's book, Chaper 8 deals with the 'Rimfire .22 Projectile.'
Dodd acknowledges that "...the .22 short and LR rounds also have the reputation of internal ricochet within the cranium, further creating complex injury patterns..." (See page 41)

You have not been charged for this research which I have conducted on your behalf :p

Dark Helmet
August 2, 2006, 09:44 PM
Used to be a guy living around here that was mugged in his younger years. He took a 38 Special in his temple at contact range- it came out the other side of his head. His nickname was- get this- Mr. Clean! :eek:

bromdenlong
August 3, 2006, 01:11 AM
jtward01 wrote:

"One of the most amazing was a guy who was wanted for killing a police officer during a bank robbery. When the cops knocked on the motel room door he made the mistake of looking through the peephole. He caught a load of 00 buck square in the chest (this was back in the early 70s when things were done a bit differently than today). When we went into the room both shoes and one sock were in front of the door where he'd been standing. The other stock was still on his foot. He'd literally been knocked out of his shoes by the blast."

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++



jtward: Everything else in your post rings true, but I find this one almost if not entirely impossible to believe. It just seems to defy the law of conservation of momentum. Did you actually see this on site, or were you just told about it later?

then again, I was an electrician in the navy for a few years, and I saw some stuff that was electrically 'impossible', so don't think I'm calling you a liar. I'm just wondering if the story didn't get exaggerated somewhere along the way, or if the guy just happened to have one sock and both shoes be the door - not that unlikely if he was intoxicated at all. I've often peeled my shoes and socks by my door and just left them there - I'm not really a neatnik.

ajax
August 3, 2006, 01:42 AM
Actually mobsters or hitmen whatever you want to call them were known for shooting you behind the ear in the soft spot and the bullets had been known to make multiple passes in the ole nugget with .22 rounds. It is also a affective way to commit suicide. My moms a nurse and when she was in nursing school she got to see a autopsy of a 17 year old boy who shot and killed himself with his fathers gun this very way.

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