First time shooter


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MedGrl
December 13, 2005, 03:09 AM
I had my first experience shooting on Sunday. My friend took me to a near by gun shop with an indoor range. We went over ear and eye protection, firing range etiquette, the 4 rules and proper hand placement and stance. We then discussed the two weapons we would use.

We used a 6" Smith and Wesson Model 27 revolver with 2 types of ammo. 38 special 158 grain SWC and 357 Magnum 147 grain JHP Handloaded (1175 fps). The second gun we used was a 6" STI Trojan Variant with 45 ACP 185 grain SWCHP Handloaded (800 fps) ammo.

After we went over the mechanics of both weapons and I dry fired the revolver (both single and double action), and learned how to operate the slide on the semi-auto we went down to the range.

In the range he showed me how to load the revolver and send the target out. We kept it at about 21 feet. He fired the first cylinder full of 38 special and then had me eject the spent casings and reload before trying it myself.

The first shot startled me a bit because the revolver moved more in my hands than it had looked like it did in his. The rest of the shots went pretty smoothly and I wound up with a nice little upwards marching of holes in my target. He told me that that probably meant that I was relaxing my grip a little. I reloaded and corrected. The nest set of six shots made a nice little cluster about 4 inches if you were to draw a circle around them. We took turns firing the 38 special ammo and after about 20 minutes he asked dif I wanted to try the 357. He warned me that it was still a mild load but that it was stronger than what we had been using.

I fired off a few cylinders of 357 and managed to keep them clustered though not as tightly and the first one missed low taking off the bottom corner of the target. We then witched over to the STI Trojan Variant.

I liked this pistol better than the revolver. It fit my hand a little better. My friend showed me how to load a clip and insert it and how to chamber the first round. I fired off the first clip full and managed to get two bullets through the same hole with just a little overlap. I had a few casings "stove pipe" and my friend showed me how to clear it before moving on to the next shot. I used about 5 clips worth of the 45 ACP ammo and by my 5th clip I had the holes in the target clustered together nicely in about 3 inches of space and even had three spots where two went through the same place.

We swept up the brass off the floor and put the guns away in their cases. I offered to help my friend clean the guns but he told me he would rather do it because he liked cleaning them.

I really enjoyed the 45 minutes we spent at the range and am going to stick with shooting. I am starting to look for a weapon of my own. A mutual friend of me and the guy who took me shooting on Sunday has a .22 and is going to let me try it out some time after Christmas.

If anyone has suggestions about what kind of gun I should look into I would appreciate the suggestions

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mindpilot
December 13, 2005, 03:18 AM
Well would suggest a 9mm of any Type. Depending on your price range $150-500 Ruger and Taurus make nice models and are known for reliability. You can pick up a P92, P89 etc for around $250. My old GF shot a 9mm and liked it alot, it was a small version like a Makarov 19x8. Very good and reliable gun for $200.

my $.02

welcome

mindpilot
December 13, 2005, 03:26 AM
Well would suggest a 9mm of any Type. Depending on your price range $150-500 Ruger and Taurus make nice models and are known for reliability. You can pick up a P92, P89 etc for around $250. My old GF shot a 9mm and liked it alot, it was a small version like a Makarov 19x8. Very good and reliable gun for $200.

my $.02

welcome

Freedomv
December 13, 2005, 03:41 AM
Excellent!

I too, welcome you to THR and the shooting sports.

Vern

Mad Chemist
December 13, 2005, 05:13 AM
Quite a command of jargon and terminology, for a first time shooter.:confused:
Wait, am I confused or is Medgrl the cofused one.:confused:
Identity crises perhaps?:rolleyes:

only1asterisk
December 13, 2005, 05:55 AM
Mad Chemist,

I think you must be confused. Just because it took you a while to learn doesn't mean that somebody else can't pick it up a bit faster.

In this case, the young lady made a concerted effort to learn everything she could before going to the range. How do I know? I'm the guy she shot with.

She did fantastic for a first timer, especially considering I had no time to load ammo for more appropriate handguns.


David

mindpilot
December 13, 2005, 05:55 AM
Quite a command of jargon and terminology, for a first time shooter.:confused:
Wait, am I confused or is Medgrl the cofused one.:confused:
Identity crises perhaps?:rolleyes:

I know....wish I had a GF like that.... :D I always seem to end up attracting the liberals arts majors that are vegetarians.

cz75bdneos22
December 13, 2005, 06:03 AM
that was an excellent write up:cool: ...i wish my words would flow such as yours just did:o ...sounds like you had an enjoyable range day. i, myself plan to take a new shooter to the range soon;) . i'll take my .22 handgun to drill in the basics and another handgun in the caliber of his choice...i'll try to get him to choose my .44 spl snubbie...:evil: muuhahha!!!

DunedinDragon
December 13, 2005, 06:11 AM
I think a lot of what will fit you will be based on your size. I just bought my son's girlfriend her first gun for Christmas which was a Taurus Millenium Pro PT-111 9mm. She went to a gun show and got a feel for a lot of different guns and felt the Taurus was best for her due to both weight and size. She's 5'3" and 105 lbs so she's not really going to feel comfortable with anything that has more recoil than a 9mm. She's also going to apply for her CCW so a small frame gun will be much easier to conceal.

I think the calibers you fired the other day will probably give you a good sense of what caliber might be best for you. It's a shame you didn't get to fire a 9mm semi auto as that tends to be one of the more popular arrangements for women...not to mention the ammo is cheap!!!

I'd definately suggest you go to a gun show and get some hands on different models and see what you think. There's no real hurry and you might as well be happy with whatever you decide.

Welcome to shooting...bet this won't be your only gun!!!:)

Mad Chemist
December 13, 2005, 06:58 AM
Mad Chemist,

I think you must be confused. Just because it took you a while to learn doesn't mean that somebody else can't pick it up a bit faster.

In this case, the young lady made a concerted effort to learn everything she could before going to the range. How do I know? I'm the guy she shot with.

She did fantastic for a first timer, especially considering I had no time to load ammo for more appropriate handguns.


David
No need to get defensive. I just thought it seemed strange that a novice shooter would know the difference b/t SWC, JHP, SWCHP. Along w/ the chrono speeds, I was expecting to see ex. spread and std dev as well:evil:

I was mistaken.
You're obviously aquainted with a bright and talented lady with an idectic memory and access to Google.:D

only1asterisk
December 13, 2005, 07:14 AM
Mad Chemist,

No eidetic memory, she took notes. :)


David

22-rimfire
December 13, 2005, 07:39 AM
Welcome to shooters world. It can be a lot of fun. Hope you continue to share the experience with your friends. Keep it up. Be safe.

I would start out with a 22 pistol such as a Ruger Mark II (5.5" bull barrel) or one of the slab sided Mark III hunters. You''ll get used to the weight and appreciate it as you will likely shoot better. Cheap and good for developing skills. That would be followed by a auto in whatever caliber you prefer in the 9mm-40 S&W range since you seem to like pistols. I have had good success with Glocks. They for the most part have smaller grips. The jamming bothers me... not normal or acceptable. I can't stand a pistol that jams much ... gone. I have no place for one. Not dependable when you need it.

Other advice. Don't give up on revolvers. You shot an N-frame Smith which is a great 357, but it a large revolver. I am a 41 mag fan (Model 57), but they are a handful until you get accustomed to the recoil. You might try something with a smaller grip such as a Ruger GP100 or a smaller framed Smith before making your final centerfire selection. A Colt Trooper Mark III would be a great selection if you can find one. Very smooth trigger, accurate, and dependable. They look good too! Shoot 38's in it until you are comfortable with it.

MedGrl
December 13, 2005, 09:35 AM
Quite a command of jargon and terminology, for a first time shooter.:confused:
Wait, am I confused or is Medgrl the cofused one.:confused:
Identity crises perhaps?:rolleyes:

I had my friend write down what we used as far as weapon and ammo. I like to be well informed. I also did alot of personal research online on top of what my friend is teaching me. :D

MedGrl
December 13, 2005, 09:42 AM
Quite a command of jargon and terminology, for a first time shooter.:confused:
Wait, am I confused or is Medgrl the cofused one.:confused:
Identity crises perhaps?:rolleyes:

I had my friend write down what we used as far as weapon and ammo. I like to be well informed. I also did alot of personal research online on top of what my friend is teaching me. :D

DunedinDragon and 22-rimfire, thanks for the suggestions. I'll keep them in mind while I'm looking...and you're right DunedinDragon...this probably won't be my only gun but...you gatta walk before you can fall and you gatta aim before you can shoot.:D

Keaner
December 13, 2005, 09:46 AM
Awesome! I remember my first time shooting, and am now hooked for life. Its an amazing experience, and a perfect way waste a paycheck!

Just 1 thing I noticed: In a handgun, the reloading device is called a "Magazine", not a clip. I know a few people here and at Thefiringline freak out when you call it a clip. Handy little way to tell the difference: A Magazine has a spring, a clip does not.

Good luck, have fun, and as always, stay safe!

I know....wish I had a GF like that.... I always seem to end up attracting the liberals arts majors that are vegetarians.

2 words: Leather Jacket. Nothing creeps them out like a leather jacket! Plus, the smell of a good jacket is irriplacable. I'm 2 years into college in _BOSTON_ and have yet to attract a single liberal!

poppy
December 13, 2005, 10:03 AM
Great write up MedGrl. It sounded like you really enjoyed yourself and you definitely had a good teacher.

I tend to be the picky "technically correct" weenie on this board. Please use magazine or mag instead of clip. There is nothing wrong with the word "weapon", but "firearm" is a little better for polite discussion.

And just a reminder to 22-rimfire, it is auto-loader or semi-auto, not auto. Now I realize that the Colt 1911 45ACP Government model says "auto" on the slide, but in today's world auto means machine gun.

As far as recommendations are concerned, I can't help much relative to female shooters. My general recommendation is that once you find your first gun, never ever sell it. poppy

happy old sailor
December 13, 2005, 10:14 AM
everytime i hear of a new woman shooter, i get this feeling of satisfaction.
of all the grown women in my family, all shoot except one DIL, first date with my wife was handgun shooting. she had no experience, none. she took to it like the proverbial duck. that was nearly 26 years ago now. and, she currently has more handguns than i, mostly confiscated from me. she also has her own reloading equipment and keeps herself supplied. mostly .38s and .357s. we live well out from suburbia, so, the back yard may have several hundred pounds of lead here and there, mostly in the dumptruck of dirt out there. then, we have a regular 50 yard range down the hill on a flat spot. yep, life is good. for a couple of shooters that is.

am i proud of my woman? just ask. i like bragging on her. i have great sympathy for guys that have wives or girlfriends that run the gamut from not liking guns to being deathly afraid of them. my one DIL is the latter and there is no talking to her on the subject. she is not anti gun, so i dont know how to describe her. she is otherwise a sweet and wonderful woman.

so much for me, i am very proud for your experience and attitude and welcome to THR and please keep us posted on your choices and the whys of it. most of us, if not all, are interested in womens opinions and choices. nothing like a gun for Xmas, birthday, whatever. solves that gift problem.

luck and good shooting. some of your girlfriends may be appaled but, if i may make a pun - stick to your guns.

fade1000
December 13, 2005, 10:27 AM
Congratulations on what sounds like an excellent day at the range.

Don't forget to look at the Kahr K-9 when you are shopping for a handgun. It is a bit more pricey than some of the other 9 mm semi-autos that have been suggested, but tends to fit smaller hands very well. I have short thumbs, and can't reach the magazine release on many of the guns I've picked up, but the K-9 fits just perfectly.

Dean

Tequila_Sauer
December 13, 2005, 10:31 AM
My g/f loves to shoot and is a natural at it (I DESPISE naturals! Here I am, practicing, happy with my performance, and she steps up and nails it). When I move to the Sig 220, I'm going to pass down the CZ to her so she can use it at the range. It's a perfect gun for her. Excellent accuracy, reliability and shoots like a dream.

MedGrl
December 13, 2005, 12:21 PM
I tend to be the picky "technically correct" weenie on this board. Please use magazine or mag instead of clip. There is nothing wrong with the word "weapon", but "firearm" is a little better for polite discussion.





Just 1 thing I noticed: In a handgun, the reloading device is called a "Magazine", not a clip. I know a few people here and at Thefiringline freak out when you call it a clip. Handy little way to tell the difference: A Magazine has a spring, a clip does not.



Thank's for the correction. Magazine and firearm from now on...thanks!:)

happy old sailor
December 13, 2005, 12:34 PM
Tequilla. sounds like you have a goodun. sounds like she has proven herself at least fifty percent of the way. if the other fifty percent suits you, do all you can to not let her get away.

i sometimes refer to my wife as "that little gunlover i sleep with". she takes a playful poke at me, knowing it is true. nothing like having a partner that is interested in your primary interests.

tell the GF good going and express no chagrin if she shoots the better. encourage her all the way to CCW and beyond, remembering she is armed, ha.

Tequila_Sauer
December 13, 2005, 12:46 PM
Yes, she drinks the most expensive tequilas in my collection and scores much higher in her first experiences than I did in my first rounds with it.

Just my luck!

I'm really happy that she enjoys it, and that she has a knack for it. I'd like to get some pictures of her at the range next time we go. She still gets nervous though if someone is in a lane near her and is shooting something loud. It kind of freaks her out a bit at first and she has a hard time settling in. That'll go away in time though.

Sport45
December 14, 2005, 02:08 PM
MedGrl, great write-up and good shooting! I think Only1asterisk spoiled you letting you shoot the Model 27 though. You are going to have to look pretty hard to find another revolver that shoots as sweet as that. You may not know it, but he treated you to a prize possession. (The STI ain't no slouch either.)

Only1asterisk, keep up the good work! If we all brought new shooters into the fold we wouldn't have to worry so much about which way the wind was blowing in D.C.

svtruth
December 14, 2005, 02:33 PM
to the sport/world/philosophy/etc.
One thing to consider is used guns. All of mine were bought used and I'm very happy with them.
But. I should mention, I'm a <1yr shooter, so there are many more experienced gun owners heree.
Good luck.

DevLcL
December 15, 2005, 12:49 AM
I had my first experience shooting on Sunday. My friend took me to a near by gun shop with an indoor range. We went over ear and eye protection, firing range etiquette, the 4 rules and proper hand placement and stance. We then discussed the two weapons we would use....

....If anyone has suggestions about what kind of gun I should look into I would appreciate the suggestions

Them is lots o' fancy words for a noobie ....... :D

When I first started shooting I said things like "I used a shiny thing, it go boom!" and used words like bullet and clip. :what: :uhoh: :banghead:

I'd go with a .22lr magazine fed! First off, you can shoot it all day for about 15 bucks. Secondly, you can get the fudamentals down easier without having to worry about the kick and noise. Then go with a bigger toy later for things like home defense or CCW.

Having a 1911 (.45), a Ruger 9mm, a and Walther .22, I'd have to say the .22 is the most fun to shoot. I worked my way backwards getting the .45 first (dumb decision) and the .22 last, learn from my mistake!

Welcome to shooting...bet this won't be your only gun!!!

Garunteed. Officially stamped and watermarked.

-Dev

GoBrush
December 15, 2005, 01:14 AM
Wecome to the shooting sports!

First of all I am glad your friend didnt scare you off by having you shoot 357 and 45 loads on your first trip. If you handled those as you discribed that is quite impressive knowing it was your first shooting experience.

Since the automatic fit your hand I woud recommend an auto if you are willing to shoot atleast once per month (you have to shoot about that much to get good and besides it is fun doing it.)

If you do not plan on shooting that much I would try different models of revolvers to see if you can find one that better fits your hand. If you do go this route I recommend a heavier 357 frame but shoot 38's through it. When you become efficient with 38's you can move to the 357.

Bottom line revolvers are easier to learn, and easier to opperate.

Keep us posted on your progress and more importantly become a voice for the sport and spread the good word.

DevLcL
December 15, 2005, 01:17 AM
And just a reminder to 22-rimfire, it is auto-loader or semi-auto, not auto. Now I realize that the Colt 1911 45ACP Government model says "auto" on the slide, but in today's world auto means machine gun.

I'm not sure what yur talkin bout! I have a .45 AUTO! :D

Thank's for the correction. Magazine and firearm from now on...thanks!

If your talking about a firefight and one of the weapons described uses stripper clips, then by all means....say weapon and clip. ;)

One thing I forgot to mention before. I've gone on a few dates now with this girl I met not too long ago. We got to talkin about my guns and she said she would like to go shooting so maybe we will go this weekend. Whenever we go I'll let everyone here know how it went! (Remember, I live near San Francisco. Getting a girl to even look at a gun is a miracle!)

-Dev

Berek
December 15, 2005, 01:52 AM
Quite a command of jargon and terminology, for a first time shooter.:confused:
Wait, am I confused or is Medgrl the cofused one.:confused:
Identity crises perhaps?:rolleyes:

Maybe a little of both. I've been teaching for 10 years and have found numerous ppl that still refer to "magazines" as "clips" and "firearms" as "weapons". I know, I'm anal about symantics.

MedGrl: Welcome to THR and the sport of shooting. I would agree that a nice little 9mm Comp or a Taurus would be a good choice. If your hands are really petite, you could try a .380 Auto. My mother has rather petite hands it it suits her fine for a carry piece.

BTW, newbies bring the ammo, I need .300WSM rounds. Got any? :)

Berek
December 15, 2005, 01:57 AM
Handy little way to tell the difference: A Magazine has a spring, a clip does not.

Actually, some clips do have springs. Leaf springs. I find it easier to say "Magazines surround the ammo while a clip just "clips" to the extraction rim covering the primer. I know, I'm just giving a hard time. :)

mnrivrat
December 15, 2005, 02:16 AM
Hi ! Welcome to THR and the world of shooting .

First, I'll let you know that some of us don't give a hoot wether you say clip or magazine . If'n were not smart enough to figure out what you mean we can always ask ya. ( and our shorts don't ride up on us from "technical" errors)

As to your first handgun, it sounds like you have a damn good mentor in David and I'm think'n he can help you weed through some of the advise . For the most part the question asked will draw a confusing amount of options.

I will only advise that you start looking at about everything you can get your hands on and find out what fits, and what you like. When you have it narrowed down to 2 or 3 specific guns you might want to come back on and check on those particular guns - not for advise of caliber and features as much as quality and reliability.

Keaner
December 15, 2005, 02:30 AM
Actually, some clips do have springs. Leaf springs. I find it easier to say "Magazines surround the ammo while a clip just "clips" to the extraction rim covering the primer. I know, I'm just giving a hard time. :)

For the most part, the spring rule works as a good rule of thumb. You cannot follow the extraction rim thing, because the M1 enbloc clip works differently. The best way I found to explain it is the Follower/Follower spring in a magazine, not in a clip.

poppy
December 15, 2005, 10:18 AM
Quote by mnrivrat:
First, I'll let you know that some of us don't give a hoot wether you say clip or magazine . If'n were not smart enough to figure out what you mean we can always ask ya. ( and our shorts don't ride up on us from "technical" errors)

Proper words and technical errors do matter. We gun types roll ours eyes and criticize media types when they use incorrect technical language. We say things like, why can't they educate themselves. Well, why can't we educate ourselves?

Quote by DevLcL: I'm not sure what yur talkin bout! I have a .45 AUTO!

I too have a .45 auto, but once again the media has convinced the public that an automatic is a machine gun. I realize that the correct terminology was Colt Automatic Pistol 50 years ago, but we live in a different world.

poppy

hso
December 15, 2005, 10:37 AM
Well done.

Most women are better first time shooters than men. They have more patience, fewer preconceived notions of how to handle the gun, and no bad habits to overcome.

With practice you should become an excellent shooter.

Phantom Warrior
December 15, 2005, 11:04 AM
Ditto on the recommendations for 9mm as a first choice. Besides being comfortable to shoot it's also cheap and easy to find. That makes it easier and cheaper to shoot a lot. The one thing I disliked about buying a .40S&W as a first gun was that ammo was always more expensive. (But I fixed that. Now I have a Beretta 92...:D ) Glad to hear you had fun.

Tomcat1066
December 15, 2005, 11:35 AM
Well done.

Most women are better first time shooters than men. They have more patience, fewer preconceived notions of how to handle the gun, and no bad habits to overcome.

With practice you should become an excellent shooter.

Also, I think there's less of an ego thing...no need to "prove" anything, so the relax and listen to instruction better.

MedGrl,
Welcome to a new addiction :D

Tom

pax
December 15, 2005, 12:20 PM
Medgrl ~

Welcome to THR, and to the shooting world as well. Always glad to meet a new shooter! Good for you for learning as much as you can as early as you can. You have a lot of fun ahead of you...

For a learning gun, I'd recommend looking at .22lr pistols, because .22 ammunition is very inexpensive and you can get in a lot of practice for not much money. The other big advantage is that because there isn't a lot of noise or recoil compared to centerfire calibers, you are less likely to develop a flinch while you are learning to shoot if you start with a .22. Some specific guns to look at would be a Ruger 22/45, or a Ruger Mark II or Mark III. You can also find .22lr revolvers if you'd rather go that route.

But if you are learning to shoot for self-defense and want to purchase your defense gun right away, there's really nothing wrong with starting out on a defense caliber (a defense caliber, very generally speaking, is anything .380 or bigger -- though as soon as I post this, you know that six cranky old men are going to start nitpicking!).

Ahem.

If you want to buy just one gun to learn on and to keep at home for protection, I'd recommend looking for a 9mm which fits your hand and your budget. 9mm is just about the least expensive defense ammunition you can buy, and so if you go with a 9mm, you won't have an excuse to stint on practice. Are you noticing a theme here yet? Practice is important and you will need to do a lot of it. There's nothing magic about any one caliber; what matters is that you will practice with whatever you choose and take the time to get good at it.

Despite what I just said, don't let ammunition price be your only criteria. The nice thing about modern centerfire guns is that you can practice your stance and trigger pull in dryfire -- that's the least expensive practice of all even though it's boring. Just be sure to follow the dryfire safety rules (http://www.thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=2005664&postcount=16) every time. Doing a lot of dryfire practice will also help prevent you from developing a flinch, and it can also help cure a flinch if you do develop one.

If you are learning to shoot for self-defense, and also intend to carry your gun as well as have it at home for protection, your gun choices do get a bit more difficult. Every gun is a compromise and carry guns more so than others. Big, heavy guns in small calibers are easier to shoot and control and thus easier to learn on. But the bigger and more powerful the caliber, the more effective it is for defense -- and the smaller & lighter the gun is, the easier it is to carry and the more likely it is that you'll have it with you when you need it. These are all contradictory needs, and only you can really decide the best balance between gun size, caliber, carryability, and shootability that will suit your particular situation. So keep asking questions and don't stop until you figure out exactly what you need.

pax

PS Don't believe the guys too much, about women having an easier time learning to shoot, or when they say women learn faster or more easily than men do. All shooters, male and female, learn exactly as fast as they put effort into it and listen to good advice. Trust me on this one.... ;)

DevLcL
December 15, 2005, 02:43 PM
For a learning gun, I'd recommend looking at .22lr pistols, because .22 ammunition is very inexpensive and you can get in a lot of practice for not much money. The other big advantage is that because there isn't a lot of noise or recoil compared to centerfire calibers, you are less likely to develop a flinch while you are learning to shoot if you start with a .22. Some specific guns to look at would be a Ruger 22/45, or a Ruger Mark II or Mark III. You can also find .22lr revolvers if you'd rather go that route.

I never thought I'd see the day when a moderator agreed with me. :D


Despite what I just said, don't let ammunition price be your only criteria. The nice thing about modern centerfire guns is that you can practice your stance and trigger pull in dryfire -- that's the least expensive practice of all even though it's boring. Just be sure to follow the dryfire safety rules every time. Doing a lot of dryfire practice will also help prevent you from developing a flinch, and it can also help cure a flinch if you do develop one.

Yes, and you'll also ruin your gun that way. How quick that happens will depend on the quality of the gun. Granted... It might takes decades.

-Dev

Berek
December 16, 2005, 04:37 AM
For the most part, the spring rule works as a good rule of thumb. You cannot follow the extraction rim thing, because the M1 enbloc clip works differently. The best way I found to explain it is the Follower/Follower spring in a magazine, not in a clip.

Touchè, wabbit... touchè....

I'll still stick to the "enclosed" explanation... Seems to work for my students.

mnrivrat
December 16, 2005, 12:50 PM
Poppy Wrote:
Proper words and technical errors do matter. We gun types roll ours eyes and criticize media types when they use incorrect technical language. We say things like, why can't they educate themselves. Well, why can't we educate ourselves?

I too have a .45 auto, but once again the media has convinced the public that an automatic is a machine gun. I realize that the correct terminology was Colt Automatic Pistol 50 years ago, but we live in a different world.

The first problem I have with this Poppy is that these "correction" posts have a tendancy to have nothing to do with the thread and generaly take away from it . Therefore I apoligize to everyone for responding away from the purpose of the thread - I will not do it again here.

Then there is the fact that although "technicaly correct" means magazine , the word clip and magazine have been being used interchanabley for decades and it isn't a big deal. If you do a search on ebay for example using the word clip you will find over 300 listing in the sporting goods section and many are listed as "magazine clip" . So, nothing to get excited about I think.

I also find it interesting that we should stop using the correct technical term of "auto" simply because the media doesn't know the difference between semi-auto and full-auto . Or if they did, they would still simply say it was a gun capable of spraying a lot of bullets in a short time.

fade1000
December 16, 2005, 01:02 PM
Yes, and you'll also ruin your gun that way. How quick that happens will depend on the quality of the gun. Granted... It might takes decades.

-Dev

Doesn't using snap caps stop that from happening?

poppy
December 16, 2005, 04:30 PM
mnrivrat wrote: The first problem I have with this Poppy is that these "correction" posts have a tendancy to have nothing to do with the thread and generaly take away from it . Therefore I apoligize to everyone for responding away from the purpose of the thread - I will not do it again here.

Then there is the fact that although "technicaly correct" means magazine , the word clip and magazine have been being used interchanabley for decades and it isn't a big deal. If you do a search on ebay for example using the word clip you will find over 300 listing in the sporting goods section and many are listed as "magazine clip" . So, nothing to get excited about I think.

As I understand it, this is The High Road, which means that "correction" posts do add to the discussion. I don't care how long "clip" has been used incorrectly, it's still incorrect. Being a structural engineer, I also get honked off every time someone says "cement" when they are talking about concrete. I believe High Roaders are in a class above and I welcome being corrected, so I assume that others do too.

mnrivrat wrote: I also find it interesting that we should stop using the correct technical term of "auto" simply because the media doesn't know the difference between semi-auto and full-auto . Or if they did, they would still simply say it was a gun capable of spraying a lot of bullets in a short time.

Forums on pistols tend to be titled "Autoloaders" or "Semiautos" I think there is a reason. If I write a letter to the editor of the local newspaper and talk about my auto gun, it will definitely be misunderstood. That was my only point. Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words can do permanent damage. poppy

Chrontius
December 16, 2005, 06:37 PM
Yes, she drinks the most expensive tequilas in my collection and scores much higher in her first experiences than I did in my first rounds with it.

Just my luck!

I'm really happy that she enjoys it, and that she has a knack for it. I'd like to get some pictures of her at the range next time we go. She still gets nervous though if someone is in a lane near her and is shooting something loud. It kind of freaks her out a bit at first and she has a hard time settling in. That'll go away in time though.

I was developing a very bad flinch because with muffs, .380 was right at the pain threshold and .45 is well above it.

Yesterday I tried double-plugging (earmuffs over deep-seated foam earplugs, for the new shooters) and I could go all day without a headache. As it is, I feel rather guilty I didn't recommend it to the guys I brought to the range. Next time, I'll bring a box of semi-disposable earplugs and some empty film canisters (the clear ones, I think) for them.

For the record, I shot much better than usual with no flinch at all, by the end of the day.

(if anyone's looking for something cheapish, nice looking, fairly easy to shoot, but suited for more than just range work, I'd have to recommend a Ruger GP-100 or SP-101 with rosewood grip inserts. They're made for .357 magnum, weigh a ton with their solid steel frames, and frankly, kick like a bunny with .38 specials)

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