The "Whole Nine Yards"......


PDA






Rembrandt
December 15, 2005, 04:48 PM
Anyone want to guess where that expression came from?.....
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v405/Rembrandt51/p512.jpg

If you enjoyed reading about "The "Whole Nine Yards"......" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Dragun
December 15, 2005, 04:55 PM
those belts are 27 feet long. when you ran one all the way out you gave the enemy "the whole nine yards". heard that one a long long time ago.

Biker
December 15, 2005, 04:57 PM
Is there an echo in here?
Is there an echo in here?

Biker:neener:

pax
December 15, 2005, 04:57 PM
Nice theory -- but the expression is decidedly older than belt-fed guns.

pax

BigG
December 15, 2005, 04:58 PM
That first guy was right, all three times. ;)

Dragun
December 15, 2005, 05:03 PM
major hi-cup in the system me thinks

wow the dreaded triple post. sry folks

Kurush
December 15, 2005, 05:09 PM
http://www.straightdope.com/classics/a2_252.html

hso
December 15, 2005, 05:11 PM
Sorry, chirrin, but the term predates aircraft and possibly firearms. There is debate whether it comes from all 9 yard arms under sail or the full 9 yard length of a great kilt.

George Hill
December 15, 2005, 05:15 PM
That link didn't shed any light... only opened more questions.

rudolf
December 15, 2005, 05:19 PM
Gosh, I'ld sure love to have that 12 cylinder plane engine in my car :rolleyes:

Biker
December 15, 2005, 05:20 PM
Sorry, chirrin, but the term predates aircraft and possibly firearms. There is debate whether it comes from all 9 yard arms under sail or the full 9 yard length of a great kilt.
I'd hate to go up against a man who could wear the "great kilt"!
:uhoh:
Biker

Dragun
December 15, 2005, 05:42 PM
See what ya started Rem?, :D

whatever way you slice it, that is a kickbutt pic though.

btw, the link states that this term was never seen in print until 1960 or something like that. curiouser and curiouser...

Rezin
December 15, 2005, 05:55 PM
I saw the title of the thread, and immediatley though of Amanda Peet NAKED with a gun!!

Link contains a gun (and a naked woman!) - [link deleted]


(From the movie "The Whole Nine Yards")

Sindawe
December 15, 2005, 06:09 PM
Gosh, I'ld sure love to have that 12 cylinder plane engine in my carI'd love to have that engine in one of my motorcycles. :evil:

mcosman
December 15, 2005, 10:00 PM
I will take the motor used in the B-36 - Largest piton engine ever. R-4360, peaked @ 3,800BHP if I recall. But that is off topic.

wingnutx
December 15, 2005, 10:07 PM
length of a kilt, I thought.

Lonestar.45
December 15, 2005, 10:10 PM
It goes way way back to the British use of cat o' nine tails to flog their unruly seamen. I can't put together more than that, but I know that's the origin. Anyone else want to add?

Azrael256
December 15, 2005, 11:14 PM
It is probably younger than the Mustang in the picture, and it is, most definitely, younger than the men holding the ammunition. The expression has only been recorded since the 1960s, and nobody, that's nobody has an explanation that doesn't smack of folk etymology.

For the best shot at the origin, read this. (http://www.worldwidewords.org/articles/nineyards.htm)

phoglund
December 15, 2005, 11:28 PM
Rezin,

That's exactly what came to my mind as well. :evil:

DevLcL
December 16, 2005, 03:38 AM
Echo!
echo
echo
echo
echo
echo
echo

;)

Kodiaz
December 16, 2005, 08:16 AM
You guys can have the engine. Just leave me the Browning .50 cal. guns

1911 guy
December 16, 2005, 09:10 AM
The expression hearks to the 27 feet of belted ammunition, as has been pointed out by posters and their echoes. That, however, doesn't stop the revisionist historians from thinking up non-martial origins for phrases we use. Remember the genius recently who tried to pass off "molon labe" as some pansy french quote? Heaven forbid it should be violent in origin and stand for a principle. Good rule of thumb: If any historical item is attributed to a politically correct origin, your information is probably wrong. We of the late 20th century are the only ones to be concerned with such bull excrement.

Rembrandt
December 16, 2005, 09:41 AM
If the average height of each man is six foot, the belts pictured appear to be about 10-12 feet in length....or are they doubled up?....or were they linked to another belt that is not pictured?

Got to admire the weight these guys were packing....(1) 50 cal BMG, plus ammo....couldn't have been easy.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v405/Rembrandt51/p512.jpg

Brian Dale
December 16, 2005, 12:20 PM
No doubt about one thing, Rembrandt: that's a terrific picture. Thanks for posting it.

Gordon Fink
December 16, 2005, 01:58 PM
That, however, doesnít stop the revisionist historians from thinking up non-martial origins for phrases we use.Ö

Because all nifty phrases have martial origins? Donít blow your top when they donít. :D

In the case of the ďwhole nine yards,Ē I had previously read that the expression related to the length of magnetic tape on a reel-to-reel deck. The usage of said recording medium also corresponds nicely to the appearance of the phrase in print in the A.D. 1960s, but that dosnít mean itís correct either.

~G. Fink

lwsimon
December 16, 2005, 02:04 PM
I was always told that it regarded the length of the belt on the MGs in the Allied aircraft from WW2. But I think I have seen it in print earlier than that, so I've no idea where its from :)

mcosman
December 16, 2005, 02:26 PM
Because all nifty phrases have martial origins? Donít blow your top when they donít. :D

In the case of the ďwhole nine yards,Ē I had previously read that the expression related to the length of magnetic tape on a reel-to-reel deck. The usage of said recording medium also corresponds nicely to the appearance of the phrase in print in the A.D. 1960s, but that dosnít mean itís correct either.

~G. Fink

Lets see. A 5" reel to reel spool is about 5-6 hundred feet, a 7" reel could go as high as 1200. So I have my doubts about that.

svtruth
December 16, 2005, 03:43 PM
Rembrandt, bu my Daddy flew a P-51 in the Pacific Theatre and the manual he brought back (about 1/4" thick btw) directed loading each pair of guns with different lengths of belt. Inner pair got the most. Makes sense from a maneuvering POV.

kasTX
December 16, 2005, 03:57 PM
mcosman,

R-4350 the largest? Not exactly...

Quick internet search found piston engines for ships of more than 1.5 million cubic inches.

If you were referring to aircraft engines, the largest would apparently be this one:

http://www.prime-mover.org/Engines/Images/lycXR7755.jpg

with 7,755 cubic inches.

R-4350 might be the largest ever put into large scale production/use though.

If you enjoyed reading about "The "Whole Nine Yards"......" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!