marlin 44mag cast bullets


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jeffrice6
December 20, 2005, 03:47 AM
I have a new marlin 44mag on the way and I have just started my adventures in reloading, which brings me to my question. When reloading lead bullets I see that there are different diameters, what size do i need ? Also, do i need to do anything different when loading cast bullets than i would with jacketed?

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jeffrice6
December 20, 2005, 05:58 PM
Anyone?

Sharps Shooter
December 21, 2005, 03:44 PM
Please ignore - I can't figure out how to cancel this message.

jeffrice6
December 21, 2005, 03:48 PM
thank you

pbhome71
December 21, 2005, 05:46 PM
I don't have a 44Magnum. I have a 357Magnum Marlin. The 44Magnum/45LC are next on my list to get.

I found an article at http://www.lasc.us/FryxellMarlin1894.htm very useful for my 357Magnum loading. There is a section about 44Mag. I hope it is useful for you.

-Pat

PS: DISCLAIMER The loads that the author discussed in the article seems to have very high pressure. Please be careful before using the load.

ChristopherG
December 21, 2005, 09:23 PM
For the truest answer to your question, you need to slug your bore. I've never done this for either of my marlins, however, rather adopting the SOP with good results; I use cast bullets one thousandth over the nominal bore diameter, in your case .430. That's where I'd start; if that doesn't produce good results, then you'll need to slug it to shoot cast bullets accurately.

JackOfAllTradesMasterAtNone
December 22, 2005, 03:06 PM
It'll be tough to find lead bullets in .431" for .44mag. Most will be .430". And many will be .429". Any of these will work. If your rifling is micro-groove ala' Marlin, this is nice. The biggest thing you need to watch with shooting cast lead bullets is barrel leading. Even those of us with long barrelled revolvers have to design our loads, (diameter of bullet, lube and velocity), with leading in mind. It sucks to go to the range, have the first ten shots be right where they should be, then watch accuracy fall off to terrible by the end of the session. Even with hard cast match bullets, for practice you want to keep velocities below 1,200fps else you'll be cleaning the barrel more often than you'll want. But hard cast lead alloy bullets can be pushed harder for hunting purposes.

Slugging your barrel is the best means of knowing what size bullet to use though. Yes, .001" larger than the barrel inner cut lands is optimum. A well lubricated .430" or .431" bullet should function fine. If you can get good accuracy with the .429" bullets, then stick with them. All lead bullets should have some sort of Alox, or Beeswax or Moly lube in the lube grooves. If not, you'll leave lead deposits in the barrel as the lead melts under friction.

If you really want to chat with some veterans of bullet casting and shooting their creations, A THR member sent me to http://castboolits.gunloads.com/ recently. I've been rewarded with a plethora of information and some really good deals on equipment from a couple members there.

-Steve

Poodleshooter
December 22, 2005, 04:07 PM
I have a new marlin 44mag on the way and I have just started my adventures in reloading, which brings me to my question. When reloading lead bullets I see that there are different diameters, what size do i need ? Also, do i need to do anything different when loading cast bullets than i would with jacketed?
Practically speaking,if you don't cast or size your own bullets,just buy what you can find. Slugging is quite handy to know for casters, but knowing that you have a .431 bore is not too useful if everyone sells .430" bullets and you can't change the bullet sizes yourself. There is usually no difference between cast bullets marked as .429 and .430. Most commercial cast bullets will vary some in diameter. They're usually larger,which is often good for accuracy.
For use in the rifle, you'll need to stick to the speed mentioned above. For best performance, go with a gas checked bullet (a little copper cap on the back of the bullet).
As for other equipment, you can get an "M" die-aka a cast bullet expander die if you want. They expand the case mouth differently than regular seaters. I'd only do that if you get lead shavings when you first try seating bullets in your normal seater.

Matthew748
December 23, 2005, 08:54 AM
Just so you know, most of the Oregon Trail .44 caliber hard cast lead bullets have a diameter of .431 inches. Midway USA carries them. I use a lot of these in my revolvers:
http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=150058

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