357 Sig, 125grn Speer TMJ & Titegroup; any load info?


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Falconeer
December 20, 2005, 02:30 PM
I recently purchased some Titegroup to try out. I usually use Power Pistol for my 9mm and figured I'd move to something with less volume, ergo more rounds per pound. Unfortunately I haven't been able to find anything in either 'Modern Reloading' or the LoadBooks 357 Sig book (my two references). Can anyone point me to a good possibility?

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caz223
December 20, 2005, 03:09 PM
Well, power pistol is a better match for your sig than TG is, that's for sure.
Reduced power loads for 357SIG aren't popular because it's cheaper to load 9mm, it uses less powder.
And that's what titegroup would be in 357SIG, reduced power.
Stick with power pistol.

Falconeer
December 20, 2005, 07:18 PM
Sounds like a plan. I wasn't aware that Titegroup was considered a low power powder. The main reason I purchased it was a little goes a long way in 9mm. :) I guess I'll keep Power Pistol on hand for 357 Sig, and Titegroup or Power Pistol for 9mm.

ReloaderFred
December 21, 2005, 01:39 PM
With 357 Sig, you're better off with a powder that's slightly compressed, since this helps with bullet setback. I've found that AA #9 works exceedingly well in this caliber. I've loaded about 12,000 rounds of it so far, and the accuracy of the round still astounds me.

I've also found that a bullet with a cannelure works best, with a crimp into it. I cannelure all my bullets for this caliber that don't come with one from the factory, and this has cured the setback problem.

Also be aware that even though this round headspaces on the case mouth, there is also a datum point on the shoulder to consider. Some die/shellholder combinations won't allow the shoulder to be set back far enough to allow the round to chamber. I had to mill off several thousandths from a shellholder to be able to size the cases enough. I've also found some nickel plated Federal brass that is too long to chamber after being fired just one time. I trimmed them, but what a pain with such a short case!

Hope this helps.

Fred

caz223
December 21, 2005, 03:30 PM
Agreed with the taper for 357SIG, some bullets just won't work.
Flat points usually work, though, and most hollow points.
Rainier plated bullets work ok for practice ammo but you won't get great accuracy out of 'em at those speeds.
Blue dot/power pistol work just fine for me.
You gotta really watch the setback, but don't overcrimp, either.
Plated bullets really do help with setback, because they tend to be .3555", not just .355", that extra .0005 helps.

Falconeer
December 22, 2005, 10:31 AM
I'm not using a cannelure at present, but I do use the Lee factory crimp die. The bullets I'm using are specific 357 Sig Speer (125grn TMJ) with flat point. I'm hoping someday to find inexpensive 9mm FMJ that will also work in 357 Sig, but I'm not going to attempt that until I'm a LOT more comfortable loading 357 Sig. :)

With 357 Sig, you're better off with a powder that's slightly compressed, since this helps with bullet setback. I've found that AA #9 works exceedingly well in this caliber. I've loaded about 12,000 rounds of it so far, and the accuracy of the round still astounds me.

I've also found that a bullet with a cannelure works best, with a crimp into it. I cannelure all my bullets for this caliber that don't come with one from the factory, and this has cured the setback problem.

Also be aware that even though this round headspaces on the case mouth, there is also a datum point on the shoulder to consider. Some die/shellholder combinations won't allow the shoulder to be set back far enough to allow the round to chamber. I had to mill off several thousandths from a shellholder to be able to size the cases enough. I've also found some nickel plated Federal brass that is too long to chamber after being fired just one time. I trimmed them, but what a pain with such a short case!

Hope this helps.

Fred

Falconeer
December 22, 2005, 10:33 AM
I'm using specific 357 Sig bullets, so they damn well better be .3555. :p

Here's a question for you folks; what kind of quality control should I expect in bullet weight? The Speers I'm using are 125grn. I had a possible loading problem, so I started weighing rounds to make sure I didnt get any squibs. I also checked bullet weights, and found a 1 to 1.5 grn variance at times. Is this normal??

Agreed with the taper for 357SIG, some bullets just won't work.
Flat points usually work, though, and most hollow points.
Rainier plated bullets work ok for practice ammo but you won't get great accuracy out of 'em at those speeds.
Blue dot/power pistol work just fine for me.
You gotta really watch the setback, but don't overcrimp, either.
Plated bullets really do help with setback, because they tend to be .3555", not just .355", that extra .0005 helps.

ReloaderFred
December 22, 2005, 12:38 PM
Because of the short neck of the 357 Sig case, you pretty much have to stick with flat point or hollow point bullets. I've used a swaging die to make round nose bullets into flat points, but that's a lot of extra work, and there are plenty of 9mm bullets that will work in the 357 Sig. Any round nose 9mm bullet will give you fits if you try to use them in the 357 Sig, so just skip them and save yourself some heartache.

You have to watch two things. The first is the overall length of the round, and the second is that there is enough bearing surface on the bullet for the short neck to grasp. You'll find that the Hornady XTP 124 grain bullets will work fine, as will the bulk Remington 124 grain hollow points. Don't try to use the Remington Golden Sabres, as they are a stepped bullet and won't work in this round.

I've got one pistol that prefers 115 grain bullets in 357 Sig, and gives better accuracy with them than the 124 grain bullets. The other one prefers 124's. For practice, I shoot either the Berry's 124 grain 9mm flat point plated bullets or 124 grain plated hollow points. They are both very accurate over 13 grains of AA #9.

As for the variance in bullet weight, that's normal. If you've ever toured a bullet factory and seen how they're made, you would marvel at how consistant they are, especially when you consider they're made by the millions. Most bullets are made on WW II punch presses. Both the Sierra and Nosler bullets are made on those machines and I've toured both plants.

Hope this helps.

Fred

Falconeer
December 22, 2005, 06:36 PM
I noticed that my 357 Sig LoadBook had info for the Hornady 124grn XTP. In fact, I loaded a box of those for my P226.

The 125grn Speer I have now are fine, except for the price. I can get Winchester 115grn FMJ for $41/1000. I paid $46 + s&h for 600 rds of the Speer. I'd like to find a better deal, as I want to shoot this pistol and round a LOT. :)

Because of the short neck of the 357 Sig case, you pretty much have to stick with flat point or hollow point bullets. I've used a swaging die to make round nose bullets into flat points, but that's a lot of extra work, and there are plenty of 9mm bullets that will work in the 357 Sig. Any round nose 9mm bullet will give you fits if you try to use them in the 357 Sig, so just skip them and save yourself some heartache.

You have to watch two things. The first is the overall length of the round, and the second is that there is enough bearing surface on the bullet for the short neck to grasp. You'll find that the Hornady XTP 124 grain bullets will work fine, as will the bulk Remington 124 grain hollow points. Don't try to use the Remington Golden Sabres, as they are a stepped bullet and won't work in this round.

I've got one pistol that prefers 115 grain bullets in 357 Sig, and gives better accuracy with them than the 124 grain bullets. The other one prefers 124's. For practice, I shoot either the Berry's 124 grain 9mm flat point plated bullets or 124 grain plated hollow points. They are both very accurate over 13 grains of AA #9.

As for the variance in bullet weight, that's normal. If you've ever toured a bullet factory and seen how they're made, you would marvel at how consistant they are, especially when you consider they're made by the millions. Most bullets are made on WW II punch presses. Both the Sierra and Nosler bullets are made on those machines and I've toured both plants.

Hope this helps.

Fred

If you enjoyed reading about "357 Sig, 125grn Speer TMJ & Titegroup; any load info?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!