Wolves kill Canadian


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GoRon
December 24, 2005, 02:36 AM
It appears the contact with humans and their protected status has made them start losing the fear of humans.


Death in Canada could alter state's wolf debate (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10568206/)

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Hawkmoon
December 24, 2005, 10:24 AM
Link no workie.

V4Vendetta
December 24, 2005, 10:41 AM
That's sad.:( If this poor fellow had a Glock 21, he'd probably still be here. Just 22...:(

Biker
December 24, 2005, 11:15 AM
I'd be curious to know if he was eaten or just killed and left.
Biker

Legionnaire
December 24, 2005, 11:20 AM
Interesting. I read the article early this morning, but the link doesn't work now, and I can't find it using the search function at msnbc.com. Wierd.

Here's a link to a different story about the same event: http://www.cbc.ca/stories/2005/11/10/wolf051110

Legionnaire
December 24, 2005, 11:24 AM
And here's the text of the above, in case it goes down as well:

C B C . C A N e w s - F u l l S t o r y :

Ontario man believed killed by wolves in Saskatchewan
Last Updated Thu, 10 Nov 2005 19:35:09

RCMP in Saskatchewan are reporting the first human death attributed to wolves in North America in more than a century.

The Mounties say wolves likely killed an Ontario man in northern Saskatchewan earlier this week. The body of the 22-year-old was found Tuesday at Points North Landing near Wollaston Lake, about 450 kilometres northeast of La Ronge.

An autopsy indicated he was likely killed by animals, says RCMP spokesperson Heather Russell.

"All of the injuries discovered in the autopsy are consistent with animal bites. But you can't completely rule everything out until the investigation is complete."

Russell said the autopsy hasn't confirmed what animals attacked the man, but he noted wolves have been sighted in the area. Tracks believed to be those of wolves were seen around the body, leading Russell to believe those were the animals that likely killed the man.

The RCMP haven't released the name of the victim, but say he was from Oshawa.

A 2002 study of wolf attacks in Alaska and Canada done by the Alaska Fish and Game Department found no examples of human deaths attributed to wolf attacks for more than 100 years.

Wayne Galloway, a veteran outfitter in northern Saskatchewan, said he wouldn't be surprised if wolves attacked and killed a human. He said that in recent years, he's seen an increase in wolf numbers and a decrease in the wildlife they prey on.

"They're a predator and I guess if man happens to be something that they'll take a pass at, they'll do it," he said.

Written by CBC News Online staff



Copyright 2004 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation - All Rights Reserved

The_Shootist
December 24, 2005, 11:44 AM
Was it a full moon....hmmm. Time to get some more .357 Silvertips :evil:

thatguy
December 24, 2005, 01:15 PM
I read somewhere that no documented killing of a human by wolves was known. I don't know but I would guess that at the very least wolf attacks are very, very, very rare and likely caused by the human messing with pups or intruding on a kill, etc.

Legionnaire
December 24, 2005, 01:48 PM
12:45 EST and the original link is working again. Hmmm.

George Hill
December 24, 2005, 02:28 PM
Interesting.
I wonder if this is going to become more common like Cougar attacks now.

Sindawe
December 24, 2005, 02:34 PM
I wonder if this is going to become more common like Cougar attacks now.I would not be suprised. It seams that when our fellow predators stop fearing humans and fleeing in terror at the mere sight of us, they begin to see us as we really are when we don't have crafted weapons.

Weak, slow, defenseless prey.

Time to put the fear of MAN back into that pack.

V4Vendetta
December 24, 2005, 02:48 PM
"It seams that when our fellow predators stop fearing humans and fleeing in terror at the mere sight of us, they begin to see us as we really are when we don't have crafted weapons.

Weak, slow, defenseless prey."

True. A friend of mine went with his nieces to the zoo. They got to the cougar area & looked through the glass for one. They saw one laying down on it's side just as casual as possible. In a split second it jumped up, ran straight toward the glass like lightning & hit the glass head on. It's face was smashed against the glass like a Willie Coyote cartoon. No one was hurt. The glass didn't break. But it scared my friend something bad. When the cougar hit the glass, he slung his nieces behind him so it would get him first & give them a chance to run.

carebear
December 24, 2005, 03:01 PM
That's no documented attacks in North America.

There are documented (or at least reported) attacks in Russia and Eastern Europe up until today.

The Freeholder
December 24, 2005, 03:15 PM
There are reasons, both good and bad, why our ancestors hunted them out. Do a little research on the history of the phrase "wolf at the door". *shudder*

one45auto
December 24, 2005, 03:37 PM
Hmmmm.....I wonder. Could it be that he OD or something and then the wolves picked at the carcass? I cannot imagine wolves attacking a human being unless they were lean and other game was scarce.

Libertyteeth
December 24, 2005, 04:02 PM
A Dogpile search turned up many resources on wolf attacks in North America, as well as worldwide. Here is an informative article. It seems attacks are far more common than wolf advocates would like to admit.

http://www.natureswolves.com/human/aws_wolfattacks.htm

Cosmoline
December 24, 2005, 04:38 PM
This was debated in an earlier thread here. I don't think it's a good idea to jump to conclusions or draw any major conclusions from this one potential attack. The only wolf attack I know of in this state involved a lone wolf some genuine idiots had been FEEDING, and it was only a single bite to a child who tried to pet it.

Here's the bottom line. A wolf pack is the ultimate killing machine. It is more intelligent than any bear or lion. It is flexible. It plans ahead and organizes its attacks. THe combined brainpower of a pack is probably the second most intelligent creature on the planet. Trapping wolves requires tremendous experience and cunning, and typically involves using the pack structure against them. IF WOLF PACKS WANTED MANFLESH ON THE MENU, THERE WOULD BE HUNDREDS OF DEATHS IN THIS STATE ALONE EVERY YEAR. Instead, it's rare to ever even *SEE* a wolf in this state, in spite of their huge numbers. They can be spotted along ridgelines or from the air, but unlike the bruins they keep well away from people and have never shown any interest in making us prey. Even over the historic record, it's rare to see a pack kill. The accounts usually involve what were probably the far more dangerous wild dogs or single wolves.

But as with any wild animal letting them get too comfortable around humans is a recipe for getting hurt. Realistically, though, the deer in your back yard or coyotes are going to be a far greater threat. Deer can kick your guts out, and have killed people with apparently relish over the years--as have moose. The solution is sane, balanced wildlife management.

Sindawe
December 24, 2005, 05:19 PM
The solution is sane, balanced wildlife management.+1 Enjoy the wildlife from a safe distance, don't feed 'em and don't get them habituated to humans.

Wanna pet the handsome wolf? Get a dog.

Wanna cuddle with the tiger? Get a cat.

Wanna feed Bambi? Go to a petting zoo.

mmike87
December 24, 2005, 05:19 PM
Effective immediately - in Canada there will be a ten-day waiting period for all Wolf purchases.

The wolves need time to "cool down" before coming home with you.

El Tejon
December 24, 2005, 07:24 PM
Did he taste like bacon?:D

Sane wildlife management? Front sight, press!:cool:

Wolves need to be shot, not coddled.

yorec
December 24, 2005, 08:39 PM
I can hardly believe there are still wolf appologists who defend these things. So what if there hasn't been a recorded/proven fatal attack on a human in North America these past hundred years - wolve's have largely been extinct in most parts... Guess what? If thier reintrodiction changes thier population status enough that they start frequenting where people do, those statistics will change.

Even in Linnell's report which so presses the "no fatal attack on humans in N. America" finding and which so many people like to cite, he gives quite a few account of children being killed by wolves. Almost a majority I think. Chilling enough for ya? Just cause it hasn't happened here yet doesn't mean it will not. Wolves don't care if thier prey is American, Israeli, Spanish, or Indian. :rolleyes:

Wolve's, neat as they are to hear while sitting around a campfire, need to remain an endangered species just to lessen thier numbers enough to keep the chances of these things happening again. Period.

Some articles:
Sure it's an article about India, but ya think wolves care about skin pigmintation? (http://www.wolf.org/wolves/learn/scientific/symposium/abstracts/003.asp)
Linnell's report in PDF format. (http://www.wolf.org/wolves/pdf/wolfattack_nina.pdf)
Some links to several other articles which cite attacks and deaths from wolves. Yep, they're dangerous Miss Virginia... (http://www.wolf.org/wolves/learn/intermed/inter_human/wolf_human.asp)

Sindawe
December 24, 2005, 08:52 PM
Wolves need to be shot, not coddled. And why is that El T? Just because they are wolves? :scrutiny:

Fact of life which so many people like to forget is that when you go into the forests, you are NOT in a city park. You in in THEIR neighborhood, and when there the risks of running into one of the natives goes up. Don't like the risk? Stay in the frelling city.Sane wildlife management? Front sight, press!Same could be said for an particular invasive plains ape that is no longer confined to its home continent of Africa.

Ryder
December 24, 2005, 08:53 PM
Who says wolves are protected in Canada? My kid was dating a girl who's parents do a yearly wolf hunt in Ontario. I almost got in on one of those trips but relationships just aren't what they used to be it seems.

A human lacking fear of wolves could be just as likely an explanation.

RWMC
December 24, 2005, 09:36 PM
In 1994 there were official wolf sightings just 40 miles north of the Iowa/Minnesota border. That was 11 years ago. All a wolf needs to survive is water, food supply and a hillside to dig a hole into. We here in Iowa are now facing growing numbers of mountain lions. Just six miles south and seven miles west of my home here in central Iowa, a deer hunter last October had set up a game trail camera in the woods of Mormon Ridge, in Marshall County. Hoping to see night deer activity, he was surprised to discover the picture of a mountain lion! I have personally seen the picture. Many people say that the DNR are the ones bringing in the big cats to Iowa. DNR denies it. Several have been shot. Some have been hit by cars. There were reasons for the killing off of these predators. I cannot for the life of me figure out why officials want to reintroduce these proven killing machines ( wolves and lions ) to areas that have been free of them for a hundred years. The animal lovers who are thrilled at the large predator "come back" should have them dropped off into their back yard! The mountain lion is at this time not protected in Iowa. I will kill any that I see without hesitation. As for the poor folks who live in the states where the wolves are protected, you need to adopt the Wisconsin cattle ranchers philosophy of "shoot, shovel and shut-up!"

Standing Wolf
December 24, 2005, 09:42 PM
I didn't do it.

akodo
December 24, 2005, 09:57 PM
And why is that El T? Just because they are wolves? :scrutiny:

Fact of life which so many people like to forget is that when you go into the forests, you are NOT in a city park. You in in THEIR neighborhood, and when there the risks of running into one of the natives goes up. Don't like the risk? Stay in the frelling city.Same could be said for an particular invasive plains ape that is no longer confined to its home continent of Africa.

8ull******.

so because some people are against hunting even a singe wolf, every person who doesn't live in a city needs to pack up and move there?

Nope. This is MY land. I for one am glad to see wolves coming back. However, once the population reaches a certain level, evey major predator should be hunted by man, be it 5 per year or 500, to prevent this kind of instance.

Now, on a happier note. A wolf/dog hybrid is 100000X more times likely to be involved in a biting or even killing incident.

Stand_Watie
December 24, 2005, 10:03 PM
+1

Cosmoline
December 24, 2005, 11:16 PM
I can hardly believe there are still wolf appologists who defend these things. So what if there hasn't been a recorded/proven fatal attack on a human in North America these past hundred years - wolve's have largely been extinct in most parts... Guess what? If thier reintrodiction changes thier population status enough that they start frequenting where people do, those statistics will change.

Don't be histrionic. If over 10,000 wolves in this state aren't munching on people, why would a handful pose a serious threat to the lower 48? Sound wildlife management with viable populations and hunting and trapping seasons to keep them in check are the answer.

I cannot for the life of me figure out why officials want to reintroduce these proven killing machines ( wolves and lions ) to areas that have been free of them for a hundred years.

I agree this should be a matter for the states to decide. But I can give you one major answer. Without major predators, life is extremely boring. If I were told I'd be forced to live in Iowa for the rest of my life, I'd take a magnum to my brain stem to avoid such a fate. The same goes for most of the lower 48. I go there now and it seems so artificial and two-dimensional. Even the woods are hollow and empty. I don't like it. Removing the great predators changes men--and not for the best. They grow too arrogant and start getting bizarre ideas about reality. They are prone to either embrace bears and wolves as big Disney characters (like Treadwell and PETA do) or they are prone to demonize the predators as Satan incarnate. Both approaches are childish.

The_Shootist
December 24, 2005, 11:17 PM
I seriously doubt the wolf population will expand anytime soon to Galveston. But I have heard tales of coyote's going toward San Antonio - and I bet cougars are wandering around in the mountains toward El Paso.

But yeah, I agree - there's a reason we almost hunted wolves and other predators to extinction - too bad we didn't finaish the job.

Faithless
December 24, 2005, 11:25 PM
Wonder what wolf tastes like.

Probably too strong and gamey.

Cosmoline
December 24, 2005, 11:32 PM
Wonder what wolf tastes like.

Probably too strong and gamey.

They're not much for the pot. Also, their livers can contain lethal amounts of Vitamin A. Though they can be fed to the dogs, I'm not sure I'd do it considering the risk of disease transmission. The two are essentially the same species and share the same parasites. But they make the warmest coats on the planet. I remember Amundsen had a special, ultra-insulated head-to-toe wolfskin outfit made for him before he left for the South Pole. He rarely wore it even in Antartica because it was too hot!

Faithless
December 24, 2005, 11:36 PM
They're not much for the pot. Also, their livers can contain lethal amounts of Vitamin A. Though they can be fed to the dogs, I'm not sure I'd do it considering the risk of disease transmission. The two are essentially the same species and share the same parasites. But they make the warmest coats on the planet. I remember Amundsen had a special, ultra-insulated head-to-toe wolfskin outfit made for him before he left for the South Pole. He rarely wore it even in Antartica because it was too hot!

Good to know. Cheers.

Bears also have the lethal liver of vitamin doom too, yeah?

mr.trooper
December 25, 2005, 12:22 AM
That's no documented attacks in North America.

There are documented (or at least reported) attacks in Russia and Eastern Europe up until today.

CORRECT-A-MUNDO!

Why is that? because what wolves still live int hose areas are STARVED for prey, thus they will take any significant kill they can get: Lone travelers included.

This is not a new thing in Europe and Russia. Its been that way for centuries. The deep forests of Eurasia are not to be traveled lightly. This situation was especialy bad durring the middle ages, when native deer populations were hunted to near extinction; starved, wolves and other predators became desperate to the point where they started devouring every lone traveler they could find; giving rise to many a classic childrens tail.

The point is, you go intot he woods, you have a weapon. Its just common sence.

Same could be said for an particular invasive plains ape that is no longer confined to its home continent of Africa.

Feel free to be the first volunteer. :D

Sindawe
December 25, 2005, 12:55 AM
so because some people are against hunting even a singe wolf, every person who doesn't live in a city needs to pack up and move there?Now did I say that everybody who does NOT live in a city needs to pack up and move there? No, I did not.

What I said (perhaps not plainly enough) is that if you venture outside the realm dominated by humans, there is a risk you're gonna run into something unpleasant. The semi-wilds and wilderness are NOT our domain, but that of the other creature on the planet. If you want a walk in a nice safe park, go to a freaking park, not the North Woods.The point is, you go intot he woods, you have a weapon. Its just common sence.+1 I cannot for the life of me figure out why officials want to reintroduce these proven killing machines ( wolves and lions ) to areas that have been free of them for a hundred years.Cosmoline says it well.... Without major predators, life is extremely boring. If I were told I'd be forced to live in Iowa for the rest of my life, I'd take a magnum to my brain stem to avoid such a fate. The same goes for most of the lower 48. I go there now and it seems so artificial and two-dimensional. Even the woods are hollow and empty. I don't like it. Removing the great predators changes men--and not for the best. They grow too arrogant and start getting bizarre ideas about reality. They are prone to either embrace bears and wolves as big Disney characters (like Treadwell and PETA do) or they are prone to demonize the predators as Satan incarnate. Both approaches are childish.Though some states are not so predator free as one might think. We here in Colorado regularly have young puma visit the Lands of Man in search of new territory. I've watchted a Black Bear sun itself on a rock outcropping just above Boulder. It give a great visceral feeling of realling being ALIVE to walk down a dirt road in the backcountry and come across deer tracks, followed by big cat tracks, in the mud that is not more than a few hours old.But yeah, I agree - there's a reason we almost hunted wolves and other predators to extinction - too bad we didn't finaish the job. What a sad, desolate vision of the world that would be, with no other land predators but us....:(

Sindawe
December 25, 2005, 12:59 AM
Same could be said for an particular invasive plains ape that is no longer confined to its home continent of Africa.

Feel free to be the first volunteer.Our herd could use a good culling, we've become like rats that are confined in a closed space, but given unlimited food and water.

The_Antibubba
December 25, 2005, 01:47 AM
Wolves, shmoolves-did anybody check out Osama Bin-Ladin's niece?

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10587661/

:D

Forget Special Forces-we'll just drop bundles of GQ Magazines over the mountains and...

Nah. Heart attack is too quick and merciful. OK, SF, back at it.

phoglund
December 25, 2005, 02:04 AM
I'm completely with Cosmolene on this one. If you go into the wilderness with out the wild it's not wilderness now is it? Those of you who think all potential killers of men should be destroyed to leave a completely safe backcountry should indeed remain cowering in your cities, leave the mountains, forests, and wild country to those with courage. I for one count myself extremely lucky to see bears in the wild and enjoy the feeling of seeing fresh sign on the trail. The mountains around here are too bare of predators as it is. I'd like to see more wolves, bears, and cougars. I know how to defend myself, my intellect and the combined intellect of my species is more than a fair match for most predators. If they get the better of me and I end up a meal, bully for them! (Although I doubt they will like the flavor. :neener: )

If this rant seems to harsh I'll make no apology. I'm a bit tired of hearing from those who want nothing but the complete extermination of every dangerous species from the planet. Bah!!

Harve Curry
December 25, 2005, 09:33 AM
Wolves don't no boundary lines. You think they read the forest boundary fence markers and turn around. It's only a matter of time before a wolf kills a human in the lower 48, probably it will be a little kid.
It cost the American taxpayers about 1 million a piece to reintroduce a wolf. It's a felony to kill one and protecting your family dog or horse is not justification. Wolves killed and fed on a milk cow near here just outside a ranchers house. They couldn't let their toddler play in the yard after that.
I saw 3 last time I was out elk hunting. They do kill for fun and they do chase herds down in Wyoming till they are run down from heat exhuastion and a whole herd of elk die and lay to rot. Our grandfathers and greatgrandfathers got rid of wolves for a reason and anybody who thinks differently is listening to the same cronies that would take away your hunting and 2nd Amendment Rights. I spend alot of time packing into backcountry, and personally I don't have a problem matching wits with any predator. But the way it is set up it's animal rights before people.

utahminirevolver
December 25, 2005, 11:12 AM
Those invasive plains apes indeed need to be culled in our age, as in all others. The eternal battle between good and evil continues. Bleeding hearts still cheer for the wrong side. Stay alert when in any unsecure area. I'd say bin Laden's niece will need to take care especially now, as Salman Rushdie has been successfully doing and like Theo van Gogh sadly wasn't so successful at.

Biker
December 25, 2005, 11:18 AM
Those invasive plains apes indeed need to be culled in our age, as in all others. The eternal battle between good and evil continues. Bleeding hearts still cheer for the wrong side. Stay alert when in any unsecure area. I'd say bin Laden's niece will need to take care especially now, as Salman Rushdie has been successfully doing and like Theo van Gogh sadly wasn't so successful at.
So, let me get this straight....Bin Laden controls the wolves too?
:confused:
Biker

Werewolf
December 25, 2005, 11:55 AM
I cannot for the life of me figure out why officials want to reintroduce these proven killing machines ( wolves and lions ) to areas that have been free of them for a hundred years.How about bringing back an apex predator to help control the burgeoning deer population.

Damn deer are everywhere. I see'em occasionally where I live in the suburbs (not exactly on the edge of town either). They're a freaking nuisance. Wolves can help control their numbers.

akodo
December 25, 2005, 01:32 PM
yes, the DNR has been the wolf's best friend and worst enemy.

Two keys to allowing the wolves back in and having them successfully co-exist with man are a)some form of hunting, and b)reasonable reperations.

I've heard tails from many a person who lost livestock to wolves in MN, where there numbers are in my opinion, currently just enough to fill the rural woodscountry. (many more and you will start seeing them in the edges of small towns, then popping up on the edges of suburbia). The state comes and inspects the killed calf or lamb or sheep. Unless they can find a strand of hair with a skin follicle, to do a DNA test, the state will argue that 'it might have been a pack of large feral dogs' Even if photographic evidence of what appears to be wolves feeding on the dead animal are presented, they say 'well the wolves were eating it when it was dead, this is not proof they killed it"

That is just silly.

The rules must be changed so that

1)if there is evidence of any animal of family canis (wolves, dogs, foxes, etc) AND there are known wolves in the area, it will be assumed that it is wolves who did the kill.

2)any evidence of family canis feeding on a carcass shortly after the death of the animal, it iwll be assumed it is a wolfkill, not wolves eating an animal that froze to death or died of old age.

It seems the DNR is SOOOO freaked out about reports fo wolf kills that they are all but fudging the results to make the total = 0, either that or they are afraid of some guy killing his own livestock and planting fake tracks to collect government money.

If the refunds for killed livestock are reasonable market value, the locals won't have any incentive to 'stage' scenes. If farmers start driving out and tossing every stillborn calf or cow that died of old age into the back pasture and coming back later hoping wolves ate it, personally, I can live with that, as such 'natural' deaths aren't very common, AND the wolves are getting some free meat out of the deal. You may argue that such a practice will encourage wolves to see livestock as prey, but wolves are ALREADY eating the stillborn calves and the odd old cow a farmer actually keeps until it keels over from age, or the odd steer that wanders away and freezes in a blizzard

Phyphor
December 25, 2005, 06:59 PM
Those invasive plains apes indeed need to be culled in our age, as in all others. The eternal battle between good and evil continues. Bleeding hearts still cheer for the wrong side. Stay alert when in any unsecure area. I'd say bin Laden's niece will need to take care especially now, as Salman Rushdie has been successfully doing and like Theo van Gogh sadly wasn't so successful at.

Whiskey Tango Foxtrot, over?

denfoote
December 25, 2005, 07:13 PM
Interesting.
It seems the wolves are going after the sheeple as well as the sheep!! :evil:

Cosmoline
December 25, 2005, 08:51 PM
Our grandfathers and greatgrandfathers got rid of wolves for a reason

Yeah, the same reason they killed off the griz, the buff and the indians. The goal was to turn the US into an extension of western European civilization. It was a bad idea. A wilderness without predators is just a forest. I do get a kick out of these myths that wolves will slaughter all the elk, though. Were the elk paying the bounty on the wolves? No. They coexisted with them for hundreds of thousands of years.

But I do agree that the first predator reintroductions should not be done at the expense of Montana and Wyoming ranchers. We should start by returning the griz to southern California. It's on the state flag, after all. Nothing will turn antis around faster than a few film producers getting eaten.

grampster
December 26, 2005, 12:25 AM
Odd. Maybe the lad died of other causes and the wolves turned up for the smorgasborg.

Medusa
December 26, 2005, 05:54 AM
We have had several similar issues around here, several years ago some packs of wild dogs killed several women and children, sometimes eating them somewhat. since then nothing was made, and if to be honest, even now it stays as it is. if to talk about wildlife, then small-time hunting seems to keep things in order.

Besides, as I rembember, getting rid of all wolves in Canada caused more problems, as all the grass-eaters population increased and later tended to feast on farmers fields. If human think he/she can run the nature better than the nature itself then it could be called mania grandiosa and distinctive lack of any vision and wisdom. keeping the balance is different story. But yes, if you want a safe par,then go to city park and get the hell outta forest then.

mrmeval
December 26, 2005, 09:36 AM
Have any online or book references to that or the time period? I don't know that at all.

There are reasons, both good and bad, why our ancestors hunted them out. Do a little research on the history of the phrase "wolf at the door". *shudder*

mrmeval
December 26, 2005, 09:45 AM
Better wolf trap. http://www.vgcats.com/comics/?strip_id=8


It appears the contact with humans and their protected status has made them start losing the fear of humans.


Death in Canada could alter state's wolf debate (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10568206/)

utahminirevolver
December 26, 2005, 04:42 PM
Biker and Phyphor, I'm sorry if my post seems a little hard to follow.

Let me try to clarify my thought train.

A Canadian got killed by wolves. A jihadist murdered Theo van Gogh. Jihadists threatened Salman Rushdie and I suspect they will likely threaten bin Laden's niece based on numerous 'honor' killings of female relatives among that group.

V4Vendetta noted that "If this poor fellow had a Glock 21, he'd probably still be here". Mr. trooper said it's commonsense to have a weapon in potentially dangerous places such as the woods.

Sindawe generalized the wolf attack to one by any predators and indicated that "Front sight, press!" is an effective way to manage them. Predators include human varmints or 'invasive plains apes' no longer confined to their home continent of Africa.

Yorec got disgusted with apologists (or bleeding hearts) who defend predators.

Sindawe said our herd 'could use a good culling'. The Antibubba then brought up Osama bin Laden's niece.

So I was likening bin Laden and his ilk to these wolves attacking innocents whenever and wherever they think they can get away with it. We, including bin Laden's westernized niece, are the relatively 'good' guys while they, the wolves, cougers, jihadists, or just garden-variety criminals, are the 'bad' guys. And it behooves us, as many others have stated more clearly than I, to remain alert and, when possible, armed to be ready to deal with a surprise attack by deadly predators.

TallPine
December 26, 2005, 06:15 PM
We should start by returning the griz to southern California. It's on the state flag, after all. Nothing will turn antis around faster than a few film producers getting eaten.
+1 :)

And I will kindly donate a few of our new Montana wolves to be released in the Central Park Wilderness Area of New York City. :D

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