Pet Peeves, Part 2: Baby Talk


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Jim Watson
December 26, 2005, 03:02 PM
I think we can do better than to talk about our “revos” and “shotties” and "Remmies" and "Norks" in public. It just sounds childish to me. Does it sound cute to you?

“Pocket Rocket” started out as a magazine cover blurb that the anti gunners have taken over as a replacement for “Saturday Night Special.” Nearly as bad as "Assault Weapon." Don’t humor them.

“Bullet” is kind of a strange one. I have heard untold numbers of shooters talking about loading their guns with bullets (even shotguns!) Yet a fair number of these very same people will ream you a new one if you should happen to refer to a "magazine" as a "clip." If you are going to use Precisionist English (Apologies to E.E. Smith, PhD.) then stick with it.

Lots of Cowboy shooters cast “boolits” for their sixguns. I guess that is OK for SASS but it looks a little strange in a general or modern reference.

I guess I have lost the battle, but when I started out, a "squib load" was a very, very, light load suitable for indoor target practice. Now it has become the term for a screwup with no or hardly any powder which sticks a bullet in the barrel. Oh, well, win some, lose some.

Am I too picky?
Or can you think of cutesy, misused, or mutated terms that annoy you?

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GEM
December 26, 2005, 03:21 PM
Don we now our gay apparel

Brokeback Cowboy Action Shooting anyone?

Troll the ancient Yuletide carol.

Too many trolls around here. :D

Seriously, how about the word 'ultimate'. Every gun on the cover of Combat Handguns is the ultimate man stopper.

How about the penultimate man stopper?

MDG1976
December 26, 2005, 03:28 PM
If we're going to talk lingo, the most overused term today is by far...
Tactical.

Zach S
December 26, 2005, 03:29 PM
Clip gets on my nerves. So does bullet when used improperly (but there's a story behind that).

For the most part, when I see something that getting in my nerves, I just brush it off. Life is too short to make a big deal about something small.

My .02.

MatthewVanitas
December 26, 2005, 03:29 PM
IRT "shotties", etc: the Marine Times had a rant against the word "cammies" a couple years back, didn't work. If I can wear my desert digital cammies whilst carrying a shottie, I don't feel too cutesy.

I do tend to prefer the less childish but still colloquial terms "scattergun", "sixgun", "slabside". I think it would all sound pretty boring if we called everything by its proper name every time.

I'm far, far, far more annoyed by the insulting names used on the board: "DemonCrats", "Repukelicans", "Shrub", "Billary", etc. Those do scads more damage to our image as responsible citizens, than is done by having goofy slang terms for equipment.

-MV

Fly320s
December 26, 2005, 03:29 PM
What is a "Nork?"

In general, I prefer more people to talk about guns in public as it desensitizes the public. And since too many people are ignorant of firearms, then maybe the baby talk is appropriate. Start with the cutesy, small words then work up the "newbs" to words like chamber, disconnector, and liberty.

gwalchmai
December 26, 2005, 03:32 PM
How come no one ever issues a penultimatum?

The Viking
December 26, 2005, 03:35 PM
What is a "Nork?"
Norinco?

Jim Watson
December 26, 2005, 03:37 PM
A "Nork" is a Norinco Communist Chinese ripoff copy of a Colt 1911A1, very popular with cheapskates and Canadians.

grendelbane
December 26, 2005, 03:50 PM
I try to be a forgiving type of person. If some one says clip when they meant magazine, I grit my teeth, say nothing, and move on.

However, there is one term that really grates on my ears. It is the practice of referring to bullets as heads. Sorry, but the head of a cartridge is on the other end.

JohnBT
December 26, 2005, 04:50 PM
I try to limit myself to one cutesy expression a month and that's probably too often.

Have you seen the beer commercial they show during the World Series of Poker? Three guys are in a driveway with a big truck and one of them starts talking cutesy to this little dog next door and a giant beer can falls out of the sky and squishes him - SPLAT!!!

Meanwhile...penultimate means... next to the last, so penultimate manstopper would not be a good thing.

John

444
December 26, 2005, 06:11 PM
Jim, I couldn't agree more.
This stuff makes me ill.
When I start reading a thread where someone uses the word "shottie", I feel bile coming up the back of my throat. No matter how interested I was in the thread up until that point I immediately click the back button. It is sort of like raking your fingernails across a chalkboard. Second place winner for me is "Bushy". That would gag a wooden neck.

sm
December 26, 2005, 06:47 PM
Mr. Watson-
I too agree.

I believe some just want to be "accepted" into a culture. I recall when I was in the medical field for a short time. Now there is a place for the vernacular of a "culture" and sometimes it is best to just use everyday language. I recall doing a pediatric rotation the child's mom was told he "abraded his patella" - she had no idea what that meant- I looked at her, "he skinned his knee".
"Why didn't your classmate just say so?"

Oh I am guilty of relating in a story my Southern Vernacular, like the kid "tumped" his box of ammo over. I tend to type as I talk. Then again I often do not on purpose name guns, platforms or similar...not as important as what the person was doing with them.

THR and TFL are very well read Forums. My take is we have folks "attracted" to us, no need to "promote" a culture with cutsey names and all.

Once these folks get off the fence, become pro-gunners, and active...I have no problem if a person relates how they took their kids shooting...and yeah, one "tumped" over his ammo...still managed to get back to shooting. :)

"Tumped" ammo shoots just fine...I was littler once, I can still "tump" and shoot with the best of them.

MatthewVanitas
December 26, 2005, 06:56 PM
... Second place winner for me is "Bushy". That would gag a wooden neck.

Ahhh... So, um... you're not digging my Bushy Dissy?


http://www.bushmaster.com/shopping/weapons/Images/pcwa2s16d.jpg

(Bushmaster Dissipator)

Texfire
December 26, 2005, 07:23 PM
Mr. Watson-
I too agree.

I believe some just want to be "accepted" into a culture. I recall when I was in the medical field for a short time. Now there is a place for the vernacular of a "culture" and sometimes it is best to just use everyday language. I recall doing a pediatric rotation the child's mom was told he "abraded his patella" - she had no idea what that meant- I looked at her, "he skinned his knee".
"Why didn't your classmate just say so?"

"Tumped" ammo shoots just fine...I was littler once, I can still "tump" and shoot with the best of them.

I've seen this in prehospital medicine too. Using precise terminology is fine when you're talking to the medic crew, and helps disguise information you don't want the patient to hear, but for goodness sake use plain language when talking with the family. In my experience, paramedics are the worst culprit for doing this, but not the only ones by any means.

Back before we had computer aided dispatching, most of our status was transmitted over radio. We would go responding, report out onscene, and give size-ups to responding units. Some of our crews had a informal contest to be first to use the word "tump" in a scene size-up without forcing it. I think the "winning" crew got onscene and reported, "Engine 1's onscene a single vehicle collision, we have one dump truck tumped over. Engine 1's assuming IC."

Tex

Larry Ashcraft
December 26, 2005, 07:57 PM
"Shottie" is the absolute worst, I hate that term. I have several shotguns (read: SHOTGUNS) and no "shotties".:barf:

Canuck-IL
December 26, 2005, 08:05 PM
very popular with cheapskates and Canadians.

Yeah, that would be a cutesy, insulting comment that wasn't necessary.
/B

GunnySkox
December 26, 2005, 08:06 PM
I love my shottie. I call him Mister Snuggle Shottiewuffles, and I refuse to let all you mean people hurt Mister Snuggle Shottiewuffles' feelings.

:D

Seriously, though. The only thing that bugs me really is incorrect terminology (clip vs. mag(azine), bullet vs. round/cartridge, etc.), I've really no problem with shortened, "ie"'d, or otherwise modified terms (I use "shottie" because I think it sounds cooler; "scattergun" is much cooler sounding, but I don't say it).

~GnSx

modifiedbrowning
December 26, 2005, 08:10 PM
Terms like shottie, nork etc don't bother me at all, like every other field certain abbreviations become the norm. I do, however, dislike incorrect technical terms like clip for a magazine or assault weapon (no such thing).
YMMV.

bermbuster
December 26, 2005, 08:32 PM
I started shooting recently. I used the word "clip" but quickly realized no one around me called it anything but a magazine so I changed. We pick up things we hear. I try to be accurate. If I don't know something I won't hesitate to ask or google for the answer.

I do (privately) call my pocket gun my "Li'l Buddy." Is that okay?

carebear
December 26, 2005, 08:33 PM
A "Nork" is a Norinco Communist Chinese ripoff copy of a Colt 1911A1, very popular with cheapskates and Canadians.

You forgot carnies and circus folk. :evil:

Jim Watson
December 26, 2005, 09:55 PM
Yeah, that would be a cutesy, insulting comment that wasn't necessary.
/B

Dam' right, I miss no opportunity to slam the Communist Chinese and their customers. I am pretty well stuck with a lot of their cheap consumer goods, but I draw the line at directly subsidizing the weapons factories of the Peoples Republican Army of Red China.

kage genin
December 26, 2005, 10:38 PM
One of mine, aside from people who say "clip" when they mean "magazine", is the shortened form of "Desert Eagle" I've seen called a "deagle".

*** is a "deagle"? It sound like some kind of dog. I've seen it happen here on THR at least once. I saw it appear on airsoft players forums all the time back in the day. I've always thought it sounded idiotic.

Black Majik
December 26, 2005, 10:44 PM
"Deagle" comes to mind. Deagle originated in the Counterstrike days. Desert Eagles would be called "deagles" and the Accuracy International AWP would be prounounced "ah-p". A sniper would be an "ah-per". :rolleyes:

Warren
December 26, 2005, 11:26 PM
What is a "Nork?"

A cammie wearing space-troll that is armed with a Mossy shottie and carries a gi-normous revo as a sidearm.

Nimitz
December 26, 2005, 11:33 PM
A "Nork" is a Norinco Communist Chinese ripoff copy of a Colt 1911A1, very popular with cheapskates and Canadians.

someone doesnt like norks? or norinco's?...

one of the more true 1911's out there than all the "tactical" ones...

who cares if they are cheap, not the chinese's fault that American gun manufacters cant figure out how to make a cheap reliable 1911...like the old ones..

Chad

Beetle Bailey
December 27, 2005, 12:12 AM
I'm with ya as far as "clip vs. magazine" and "bullet vs. cartridge or round" because that is a matter of being exact and correct.

"Revo" sounds funny to me, and I suppose I could do without it, but "Auto" is perfectly acceptable to me, and isn't it sorta the same concept?

"Bushy" does sound funny, but for a completely different reason. But we do call a Chevrolet a "Chevy" so I'm not gonna get too worked up about it.

I believe "Deagle" is hated mainly because the people who most often use the term have a very limited knowledge about real firearms, but behave as if they were highly trained experts simply because they have used the weapon to good effect in a video game. IOW, the term "Deagle" is associated with arrogance.

ka50
December 27, 2005, 12:42 AM
ahhh... I love shotties and bullets inside the clip of my glockie

I also hate people who trip out on technicalities

deagle that

CombatArmsUSAF
December 27, 2005, 01:03 AM
Why have we adapted a word (Shottie) that was initially started by the R&B and cRAP culture?

Strings
December 27, 2005, 01:15 AM
sorry guys: the only one that gets to me is "Deagle" (or would it properly be spelled "DEagle"?). That just grates my nerves...

MatthewVanitas
December 27, 2005, 01:17 AM
Why have we adapted a word (Shottie) that was initially started by the R&B and cRAP culture?

Okay, hmmm....

So, it's silly and immature to use the word "shottie" as the dimunitive of shotgun, but it's perfectly acceptable to use the term "cRap" to deride an entire genre of popular music?

"Shottie" might sound slightly silly to some people, but using insults like "cRap" just helps confirm anti-gunner stereotypes.

-MV (Combat Arms, USMC)

jrpeterman
December 27, 2005, 01:24 AM
As long as they are gun enthusiaists, I don't get too wound up about "magazine or clip", remmies, winnies, or roscoes. What I find more irritating are so called "experts" that have an opinion about everything. If you don't have what they have or what you have isn't as good as what they have, can cause me to bite down on my lip sometimes hard enough to bleed. Biggest kick that I got was at the local gun club with a friend and co-worker. This fellow is a very good shooter, weapons trainer, and former NG armorer. A guy comes up to us as we were uncasing our Glocks. He resembled Jesse Ventura. He starts off by stating he's a deputy sheriff for the county where our gun club was located, weapons trainer, etc. He has tried brand x,y, & z for dept. trials and brand x was the only type of gun that he couldn't break yada,yada,yada. He then asks my buddy if he would like some advice before we started shooting. My friend being polite said sure, so the guy proceeds to giving him pointers on shooting the Glock. My friend thanks him and we begin target shooting at 15 yards. The guy stood right behind watching us. My buddy shoots a nice ten round group about the size of an Einsenhower dollar piece with his Glock 21. The deputy didn't say another word and went back to his shooting lane and fiddled with his black powder revolver until we left.

oneslowgun
December 27, 2005, 01:52 AM
You guys, (and gals) have no idea.. Untill I began "lurking" here long ago, ( and then when I did sign up, had a diff screen name,) I had never even heard the term "shottie".

Where I grew up, in the NW tip of PA (called North East.. go figure), these are the terms I grew up with:

.45 or .44 ment a SA revolver. Colt, Ruger, or some other copy. As in, "I wupped out my .45 and had at."

Automatics, be it a handgun, rifle, or shotgun were looked down on, and "Not to be trusted" Mention of using a "automatic" was always followed by a shaking of the head, a short laugh, and either "He's lucky he hit anything with that", or "An autoloader? how fast does he think he needs to miss?"

If someone said "I used my revolver" (pronounced REvolver) it was understood that they ment a DA revolver. This term was interchangeable with "My Thuty-eight" (meaning .38 SP, OR .38 S&W, or .38-40), or sometimes "My Thuty-two, (And THAT could lead to confusion, as many I knew had 32-20 SA revolvers, VS .32 S&W REvolvers,... you had to know the man, (or woman) then you would know the gun.)

As for shotguns, there were "Scatterguns", (ALL side-by-side shotguns), "Pump guns", (ALL pump shotguns, 20, 16, or 12 GA), and "Them autoloaders".
"Shotgun" alone, ment a single barrel, or a bolt-action, again you had to know the man (or woman) to know what they were talking about.

Now, so you understand, from the time I was 8 or so, I "hung out" with all the older folk within about 5-6 miles of where I lived. I don't think a single one of them could step outside to "crack-off" a few rounds without me being there within a few minutes. I would show up, and ask what kind of gun it was, how it worked, and why they used it, for whatever they used it for. Of course, I asked to shoot it, and then I always asked if I could clean it. At the ripe old age of 11, I accended to the "Order of the M1 Thumb" :eek: , and this is after much work learning to handle the .30-40 Kraig, 7.92 Mauser, 7.5 Swiss, and the 6.5 Carcano. ( Not in that order)

It may sometimes be a bit irratating to hear incorrect wording, or bad termonology, but you must also regard where and how the terms were picked up. It never mattered to me when shooting an old issue 1911, that one of those old gents called it a "mag", and another called it a "clip". I was just dang happy to be allowed to try it out.

Ryder
December 27, 2005, 03:06 AM
I'm willing to cut the younger people some slack. Sure is hard to figure out what they're talking about sometimes though.

When talking technical details it's pretty much mandatory to use correct terminology if you really want to be understood. I get the feeling some people don't know the difference between an extractor and an ejector. This is like someone who drives a car and doesn't know how to check the oil.

PS - I'm getting a new boomstick next month :evil:

Janitor
December 27, 2005, 07:29 AM
I love my shottie. I call him Mister Snuggle Shottiewuffles, and I refuse to let all you mean people hurt Mister Snuggle Shottiewuffles' feelings.

:D
~GnSx
:ROTFL:
-

El Tejon
December 27, 2005, 07:44 AM
These kids today with their hipping and a hopping and wearing hat backwards and baggy jeans. I blame rap music, text messages, and junk food for all this infantilism.

Jim, I'm with you, but you cannot stop the text message society. Darn kids.:banghead:

loose cannon
December 27, 2005, 08:01 AM
you say shottie i say shotty.favorite broke back mountain line;

"i dont know how im gonna quit you"

pet peave when i let it;gun writers using the term"fodder"to describe ammo. dont let it much.

hso
December 27, 2005, 08:07 AM
My problem with insider jargon is that much of it is too "insider". It's often some obscure reference to some micro-cultural joke that the general gun using community isn't even aware of. Since the advent of internet boards and forums obscure references come slithering out of cliques and obscure clear communication like jive from years ago.

Sure "mag" for magazine is easy enough to get the meaning of, but "Nork"? I'd rather be understood than seem "cool".;)

wundudnee
December 27, 2005, 08:21 AM
PET PEEVES:

Grammar police

Forum monitors

Putting down other's firearms

Phoney experts

Geographic snobbery

Ford-Dodge-Chevrolet arguements

One brand wonders

Cell phones

Kitten stompers

Geezer bashers

Me too's

:rolleyes:

Texfire
December 27, 2005, 09:07 AM
PET PEEVES:

Grammar police

Forum monitors

Putting down other's firearms

Phoney experts

Geographic snobbery

Ford-Dodge-Chevrolet arguements

One brand wonders

Cell phones

Kitten stompers

Geezer bashers

Me too's

:rolleyes:


Me too. :evil:

Tex

Jim Watson
December 27, 2005, 09:35 AM
PET PEEVES:

Grammar police

Ah-HA!

I'm not going to police your grammar, but I will bypass your post if it is not intelligible. Watch for a future Pet Peeve on the subject.

Geno
December 27, 2005, 09:52 AM
It's funny to watch her as she rolls her eyes, watching a television show, and retorts, "That's a revolver...a reeevooooolveeeeeeer!" She usually ends it with, "I'm only 11, and I know the difference!"

:D

Doc2005

Strings
December 27, 2005, 09:52 AM
Speaking of pet peaves...

WHY do I always get someone assuming that, because the word "Rose" is part of my handle here, I'm female? THAT has to be the most irritating thing I've run into yet!

Newsflash: despite the name, and wearing a kilt, my wife assures me that I AM still male!

Sorry... had to get that of my chest...

Sleeping Dog
December 27, 2005, 10:37 AM
gun writers using the term"fodder"to describe ammo

Nope. "fodder" be hoo gimme da fust gun. .22 Stevens from Sears&Roebuck. Nobody ever called it a "Stevie". Until now.

Now I got a Mossie racker shottie to go with the Winnie Grand. The Winnie Grand holds 8 bullets in the enbloc mag. I have other names for the Mossie racker shottie, especially after shooting 12ga 3" slugs, but those names are not for Art's gramma's eyes or ears. The Remmie 03A3 shoots the same bullits as the Winnie, it just kicks more.

For a 1911 I got a Argie (sistema). Nice gun, but nobody will ever name a malt liquor "Colt 11.35 mm". Then there's the Bulgie Mackie, funny little commie pistol that holds 9x18 bullits in the clip.


The first time I noticed the word "shottie" was in a post that had a picture of Sean Penn on a little boat filled with his entourage, going on some kind of rescue mission in New Orleans. Penn was standing like Washington crossing the Delaware. Cradling a shotgun. So now when I hear "shottie", I think "wacko".

Regards.

deadin
December 27, 2005, 11:17 AM
It just sounds childish to me.

Jim, I think you answered your own question about "baby talk" . Just consider the source. Probably about 15 or 16 and trying to sound adult and "cool".

I actually find it useful in who to sort out and ignore in most posts.
If a "poster" is actually trying to gain some knowledge or insight, I will be one of the first to try to help. On the other hand, if they're trying to impress their little buddies (and others) with how knowledgeable and mature they are, I just pass on.

I can't remember (a sure sign that I'm an old fart :D ) which board I had posted a list of "key words" that I use to filter out certain threads. Things like: "vs", "best", "scenario", "what if", etc. If I see them in a title, I just move on 'cause I know I'm not going to be interested.

Remindes me of a little kid, probably 4 or 5, that we used to have in our neighborhood. He would walk up to you and state "My name is Johnny and I'm the toughest kid in town" and then he wouild spit. Johnny's problem was that his "spitter" wasn't very well developed and most of it would end up on his chin and shirt front.
All I can say to some of these posters is "Careful, you're starting to dribble."

Dean

Scoupe
December 27, 2005, 11:24 AM
PET PEEVES:

Grammar police

Forum monitors

Putting down other's firearms

Phoney experts

Geographic snobbery

Ford-Dodge-Chevrolet arguements

One brand wonders

Cell phones

Kitten stompers

Geezer bashers

Me too's

:rolleyes:

Yo tambien. :rolleyes:

Kharn
December 27, 2005, 11:27 AM
Yeah, that would be a cutesy, insulting comment that wasn't necessary.
/BNorincos can be imported into Canada, we cant get'em anymore thanks to one of Clinton's bans. They were pretty decent base guns for customizing, from what I read.

Kharn

Justin
December 27, 2005, 11:39 AM
I've got better things to do than get worked up about colloquialisms and abbreviations.

riverdog
December 27, 2005, 12:09 PM
I don't have much in the way of pet peeves. That said, it bothers me a bit when I (try to) read posts from someone who obviously spent a lot of time putting some good thoughts together, but he can't spell or doesn't know the difference between their, there and they're; to, too and two; or lose and loose. Sometimes I find myself thinking, "What is this guy trying to say?", as I attempt to decipher the text. If it's important enough to write and post, it's important enough to proof read.

As for magazine vs clip and bullet vs cartridge that's just an incorrect use of terms I can deal with. It may or may not indicate an ignorance on the part of the writer that I will put into context.

I use "revo" as an abbreviation for revolver, not trying to be cute. "Shottie" doesn't save any typing so it makes no sense to me; SG makes sense, as does 870, O/U or SxS, but "shottie" doesn't help.

W Turner
December 27, 2005, 12:14 PM
As stated by a few people before me, misusing terms (clip versus mag for example) makes me want to correct people. Using cutesy names for things usually gets one of these (:rolleyes: ) from me.

Do I think it's a little juvenile, yes, but hey, the reality of the situation here is that most of the items we talk about buying are just toys for adults anyway. The saying that the only difference between men and and boys is the price of their toys definitely applies to the gun culture. This kind of makes them toys, even if referring to them as such makes me throw up a little in my mouth.

BTW- I hate real babytalk too. When people come up to my 17 month old son and start talking in that mealy-mouthed, sing-song tone, I have to restrain myself from either *****slapping them or telling them to get a diaper of their own if they're going to talk like a baby. My son usually runs from people who talk like that or looks at-em like :scrutiny: . Can't wait until I can teach him to ask if they have a speech impediment........lol.

W

pax
December 27, 2005, 12:16 PM
*shrug*

What Justin said.

Plus it seems to me that the world is a lot less boring when people take the trouble to find new ways to say stuff.

pax

What's another word for 'thesaurus'? -- Steven Wright

thereisnospoon
December 27, 2005, 12:31 PM
I have a few facts and a lot of opinions.

So does that mean you DON'T want to see my uber-tactical, pen-ultimate shottie/revo/Ak47/AR15 combo for werewolves and vampires and general SHTF situations???

Edited to add:

Jim, I think you answered your own question about "baby talk" . Just consider the source. Probably about 15 or 16 and trying to sound adult and "cool".

I actually find it useful in who to sort out and ignore in most posts.
If a "poster" is actually trying to gain some knowledge or insight, I will be one of the first to try to help. On the other hand, if they're trying to impress their little buddies (and others) with how knowledgeable and mature they are, I just pass on.

I can't remember (a sure sign that I'm an old fart ) which board I had posted a list of "key words" that I use to filter out certain threads. Things like: "vs", "best", "scenario", "what if", etc. If I see them in a title, I just move on 'cause I know I'm not going to be interested.

Remindes me of a little kid, probably 4 or 5, that we used to have in our neighborhood. He would walk up to you and state "My name is Johnny and I'm the toughest kid in town" and then he wouild spit. Johnny's problem was that his "spitter" wasn't very well developed and most of it would end up on his chin and shirt front.
All I can say to some of these posters is "Careful, you're starting to dribble."

Dean

Well NANABOOBOO:neener:

trickyasafox
December 27, 2005, 01:26 PM
nicknames be damned i just wish someone could figure out a better way to convey humour with times new roman then having to use so many smileys

Nimitz
December 27, 2005, 01:59 PM
I've got better things to do than get worked up about colloquialisms and abbreviations.

Exactly. you guys sure do complain and whine alot about "pet peeves"....

it honestly cant be that big of a deal that you label the poster a "poser", or "childish"...

or can it?:uhoh:

guys need to just relax...they are words...

now for the reason, most abbreviations on the internet are long words that are difficult or time consuming to type... ie. mag instead of magazine. semi-automatic pistol compared to auto pistol...

Chad

444
December 27, 2005, 03:08 PM
"Plus it seems to me that the world is a lot less boring when people take the trouble to find new ways to say stuff."

Well, to each their own. That is something that I have never understood as far back as I can remember. I can remember being irritated by that since I was a young kid. It never made sense to me, why people would insist on making up new words to mean exactly the same thing as a word that already existed and was in common usage. Especially when it was obvious that the point was to sound cool. By the same token, I have never gotten into nicknames. I work with a guy that spends half his time making up new nicknames for everyone and then using the new name over and over: talking to them just so he can use the nickname that he just made up.
I don't get it.
But then, I am not important enough to have better things to do.

gwalchmai
December 27, 2005, 03:11 PM
Well, to each their own.
No. To each HIS own! That just drives me nuts!!!





;)

adaman04
December 27, 2005, 04:19 PM
Haha. I think a lot of it has to do with, as lame as it sounds, having to type the extra letters. The difference between shotgun and shotty isn't much, but when you post 50 times a day, a lot of people do it.

But, its kind of a double-standard, because doesn't anyone here say "Chevy" instead of "Chevrloet"? I have always been a GM man, and I know I do it. But, shotty, Remmy, and worst of all WINNY! I think I just threw up in my mouth. Just enough so I could taste it. :uhoh: What the heck are you talking about your M70 Coyote, or the bear that loves HUNNY! :banghead:

1911Tuner
December 27, 2005, 05:04 PM
Well...I guess I can't say Chevy when speaking of Chevrolet. Better stop sayin' Mopar too. All you United States Marines...Ya'll can't say Jarhead no more...and my buds gonna hafta quit callin' me "Gunny"...It's Gunnery Sergeant from now on! (oorah)Ammo too must fall by the wayside. We must say ammunition! It's only proper. Suppose we'd better start differentiating
between magazine and removeable box magazine as well...They ARE different, after all. Clip? I shall henceforth trounce all who misuse the term.
Disconnector? No no! It's "disconnect!" SUV must become Sport Utility Vehicle and 4-wheelers are correctly referred to as off-road, all-terrain
recreactional vehicles.

This could go on and on and on and...on.

But I'll close with the two rules of life that my father used quite often.

1 "Don't sweat the small stuff.
2 "Most things are small."

:D

Cheers!

psyopspec
December 27, 2005, 05:14 PM
These kids today with their hipping and a hopping and wearing hat backwards and baggy jeans. I blame rap music, text messages, and junk food for all this infantilism.

Jim, I'm with you, but you cannot stop the text message society. Darn kids.

Excellent idea. Blame inanimate objects and abstract concepts for the problem. Who else does that?

As for the abbreviations and slang, I generally avoid the more cutesy words myself, but if others feel the need it doesn't get to me.

Nimitz
December 27, 2005, 06:13 PM
Well...I guess I can't say Chevy when speaking of Chevrolet. Better stop sayin' Mopar too. All you United States Marines...Ya'll can't say Jarhead no more...and my buds gonna hafta quit callin' me "Gunny"...It's Gunnery Sergeant from now on! (oorah)Ammo too must fall by the wayside. We must say ammunition! It's only proper. Suppose we'd better start differentiating
between magazine and removeable box magazine as well...They ARE different, after all. Clip? I shall henceforth trounce all who misuse the term.
Disconnector? No no! It's "disconnect!" SUV must become Sport Utility Vehicle and 4-wheelers are correctly referred to as off-road, all-terrain
recreactional vehicles.

This could go on and on and on and...on.

But I'll close with the two rules of life that my father used quite often.

1 "Don't sweat the small stuff.
2 "Most things are small."

:D

Cheers!

most intelligent post in this thread....well maybe expect mine.;)

Chad

El Tejon
December 27, 2005, 06:22 PM
pyso, it's sarcasm, dawg. I'm from the str33tz so I keep it real.:D

I blame facial hair, rock 'n roll,and the fact that I'm using a keyboard for the inability to see sarcasm. These kids today, back in my day we had to walk uphill in the snow to use irony, wit, and, if we were lucky and ate our dinner, we were allowed to use sarcasm.;) :evil:

I tied an onion to my belt, which was the style at the time . . .

psyopspec
December 28, 2005, 12:51 AM
Good to hear, T. I thought that was a bit out of character for you.

Incidentally, I'm from the strizzeets as well. Me and the peeps be holding it down here in Far-to-the-go. Peace out.

Carl N. Brown
December 28, 2005, 03:11 PM
I don't use other peoples slang or lingo. So I don't
say shottie or revo. But that's other folks choice.
If I did it, I'd be a poser or poseur or something,
which I think is the real offense: using lingo to
try to be cool and end up looking uncool. Speak
your own tongue.

But I have seen authoritative sources refer to the
detachable box magazine of the 1911 as "clip" in
fact I think was a military field manual.

Calling a Mossberg a Mossie or Mossy (especially if
it has a RealTree(TM) finish does appeal to me.

Too cute though can make me gag too.

CombatArmsUSAF
December 28, 2005, 03:52 PM
Okay, hmmm....

So, it's silly and immature to use the word "shottie" as the dimunitive of shotgun, but it's perfectly acceptable to use the term "cRap" to deride an entire genre of popular music?

"Shottie" might sound slightly silly to some people, but using insults like "cRap" just helps confirm anti-gunner stereotypes.

-MV (Combat Arms, USMC)

Have you ever listened to the so called music they call rap? I doubt it since you're defending it. That is assuming you could understand it, which isn't very likely.

Nudity and violence on TV are popular too, but that doesn't make them right or any less damaging to the youth of today.

I am not an advocate of "Society made me do it" Defenses but can you come up with a better explanation why 13 and 14 year old girls want to look like Britney Spears?

When did gang-banging trash, become something to idolize in this country?

And so what if I don't like that crap, I am not subject to censorship.

trickyasafox
December 29, 2005, 01:39 AM
pyso, it's sarcasm, dawg. I'm from the str33tz so I keep it real.:D

I blame facial hair, rock 'n roll,and the fact that I'm using a keyboard for the inability to see sarcasm. These kids today, back in my day we had to walk uphill in the snow to use irony, wit, and, if we were lucky and ate our dinner, we were allowed to us


proves my point times new roman sucks for humour, and the smileys aren't hackin it.

BigG
December 29, 2005, 07:55 AM
My peeve is the generic use of "1911" and "AR15" to signify copies of the actual thing.

It's akin to a guy saying "I have a souped up Chevy 327 and when you see it, it turns out to be an Accord with a wing and rims." I'm done. :neener:

Bob R
December 29, 2005, 09:11 AM
If shottie is the diminutive of shotgun, wouldn't it be a proper use of the word when describing this:

http://www.serbu.com/shorty.htm



Looks like a "shottie" to me. :neener:

bob

deadin
December 29, 2005, 09:31 AM
I just ran across a new one. "Broomie" for a M1896 Mauser. The post had something to do about CCW. (I quit reading as soon as I hit the "cutesy") although I was tempted to answer "I knew a guy that carried a Broomie in his pantsies, but it got tangled up with his thingie and now he walks funny."

Old Dog
December 29, 2005, 10:54 AM
It just seems a little silly to me when (ostensibly) grown-up men and women use the slang of the hip-hop culture, i.e., "po-po" for police ...

The use of "prolly" to substitute for "probably" is strange (only saves ya two characters and sounds stupid). Lately I wonder about all the folks who type in "LOL" or "ROFLMAO" in response to posts that ... aren't in the least bit funny. As a grammar stickler, the improper use of apostrophes is somewhat annoying, too ...

Guess I'm just from a different era, though, when folks tried to put their best face on in public ... now it seems many are just interested in presenting themselves as cool folks, as though aspiring to be current on street slang gives one more credibility than using good English and attempting to at least provide the appearance of having a decent education ...

Yep, I've officially become a curmudgeon ...

birddog
December 29, 2005, 11:03 AM
"Shottie" is the absolute worst, I hate that term. I have several shotguns (read: SHOTGUNS) and no "shotties".:barf:

+1. That one gets under my skin, too.

grnzbra
December 29, 2005, 11:40 AM
:banghead: Myself instead of I or me :banghead:

Billy and I went to the park.
Dad gave a football to Billy and me.

Sarcasm On and Sarcasm Off tags.

He then asks my buddy if he would like some advice before we started shooting. My friend being polite said sure, so the guy proceeds to giving him pointers on shooting the Glock. My friend thanks him and we begin target shooting at 15 yards. The guy stood right behind watching us. My buddy shoots a nice ten round group about the size of an Einsenhower dollar piece with his Glock 21.

Sounds like the guy was a good teacher.:p

444
December 29, 2005, 12:08 PM
:uhoh:
"BTW- I hate real babytalk too. When people come up to my 17 month old son and start talking in that mealy-mouthed, sing-song tone, I have to restrain myself from either *****slapping them..."

I have gagged a lot of people because I baby talk dogs: especially my own cute litte 145 pound Rottweiler (RIP). I am like that guy that gets smashed with the giant beer can.

BigG
December 29, 2005, 12:12 PM
To people down here, it's "Chevillay." :neener:

pax
December 29, 2005, 12:58 PM
Sarcasm On and Sarcasm Off tags.
The problem is, if you leave those tags off, the humor impaired people all come after you. After awhile, getting flamed by the clueless gets downright annoying, and so it seems better to head it off at the pass.

Not that it helps. The truly clueless we always have with us...

pax

Lord, sometimes you have to wonder: is there a factory somewhere that's churning out stupid people? -- Ray Owens

Carl N. Brown
December 30, 2005, 04:48 PM
Shiverlay?
Potatoe, Potahto.

Janitor
December 30, 2005, 04:56 PM
I have gagged a lot of people because I baby talk dogs
Excellent! Company at last.

I thought I was the only dork that did that.
-

spooney
December 30, 2005, 07:44 PM
The most worshipped company on these boards, Marlin, uses clip to describe a detachable magazine.

grnzbra
December 30, 2005, 07:58 PM
I have gagged a lot of people because I baby talk dogs.

I tend to gag them when I talk adult talk to my dog. "Mac, I really need you in your cage now"

steveno
December 30, 2005, 08:09 PM
I can't wait until you get to your "reloading" pet peeves

GunnySkox
December 31, 2005, 03:28 AM
The most worshipped company on these boards, Marlin, uses clip to describe a detachable magazine.


*Vader*
NNNOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!
*/Vader*

~GnSx

No_Brakes23
December 31, 2005, 04:10 AM
I think it's funny that y'all are talking about this in English, a constantly evolving bastard tongue if ever there was one.

It is also funny to see people whine about one supposedly technically incorrect term, and then go use another. Aren't we talking about firearms, not guns, after all?

And as for the whole "clip" thing, well I put clips in my SKS, and I will use a different kind of clip when I get my Garand, but right now both of my "Remmies" (597 & Nylon 77) take clips, too.

http://tinypic.com/jh3u4z.jpg
:neener:
http://www.remington.com/products/accessories/gun_parts/magazine_clips.asp

I also think it shows cultural bias and ignorance, if not thinly veiled racism when people assume every firearm abbreviation comes from hip hop. Obviously some do, but people were tweaking words long before rap music.

Spot77
December 31, 2005, 05:17 AM
But I'll close with the two rules of life that my father used quite often.

1 "Don't sweat the small stuff.
2 "Most things are small."


Somewhere over the years I've come to use another form of that saying:

"Don't sweat the petty things, and don't pet the sweaty things." :eek:

Brian D.
December 31, 2005, 12:57 PM
What's with the venting anyhow, Jim Watson? Is there a Chief Curmudgeon position that's become available on this forum board? (How much does it pay?)

Or is this an audition for Andy Rooney's job on 60 Minutes? (Mr. Rooney apparently is still among the living btw; you may be a bit premature with this plan to supplant him..)

bigjim
December 31, 2005, 04:05 PM
Yeah, that would be a cutesy, insulting comment that wasn't necessary.
/B

It was also redundant.

No_Brakes23
December 31, 2005, 04:22 PM
Somewhere over the years I've come to use another form of that saying:

"Don't sweat the petty things, and don't pet the sweaty things." :eek: Ha! I almost ASNR'd chili out my nose reading that one.

akodo
December 31, 2005, 04:47 PM
Meanwhile...penultimate means... next to the last, so penultimate manstopper would not be a good thing.

John

I beg to differ. There are two guys, me and him. I use my penultimate shotgun on him. Now, he bieng dead, I am last man standing. Which makes him next to last! :what:

goste
December 31, 2005, 05:13 PM
They don't really bother me.

I guess if I make it to older age, I may allow myself the luxury of letting small things irritate me.

I learn WAAAAY to much, from you people, to worry about anything like that. :cool: :cool:

Nimitz
December 31, 2005, 05:31 PM
It just seems a little silly to me when (ostensibly) grown-up men and women use the slang of the hip-hop culture, i.e., "po-po" for police ...

The use of "prolly" to substitute for "probably" is strange (only saves ya two characters and sounds stupid). Lately I wonder about all the folks who type in "LOL" or "ROFLMAO" in response to posts that ... aren't in the least bit funny. As a grammar stickler, the improper use of apostrophes is somewhat annoying, too ...

Guess I'm just from a different era, though, when folks tried to put their best face on in public ... now it seems many are just interested in presenting themselves as cool folks, as though aspiring to be current on street slang gives one more credibility than using good English and attempting to at least provide the appearance of having a decent education ...

Yep, I've officially become a curmudgeon ...

hmmm we arent in public...I sure hope people dont say "lol" and such in the RW...pssst RW = real world :neener:

Chad

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