Coyotes at night?


PDA






El Tejon
December 27, 2005, 05:02 PM
My brother who lives in the Blue River Valley in Eastern Indiana is overrun with coyotes. I went out to his place on Christmas Day and he showed droppings and many tracks (ground was soft from rain) right inside the curtilage.

The problem is this: he can hear them but since he lives in the woods, waaaaay out in the woods, there is no ambient light, save for the stars, and cannot see them.

What sort of gear or technique would you recommend?

He has a 3 million candle spot light but it just scares them away and he cannot get the shot off before the coyotes are in the next county.

If you enjoyed reading about "Coyotes at night?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Delmar
December 27, 2005, 05:13 PM
Find a suitable place on the property where you can bait, or at least put a remote call. Hang a red light over the area-it should not spook the game so much, sit back and enjoy! Varmint lights-those which attach to the scope have been used successfully as well.

Larry Ashcraft
December 27, 2005, 05:16 PM
I would use one of those little headlamps with the red LED "night vision" lights on it, and a shotgun. Those little lights light up a surprising area and the red is not supposed to be noticed much by coyotes.

Art, however, has more experience with this, and I suppose he'll be along soon.

El Tejon
December 27, 2005, 05:21 PM
Dogs cannot see into this spectrum, right? I think I remember a young lady in the vet program at Purdue telling me this.:confused:

So, like red lights on a timer or battery? Put them out in the afternoon and leave them out all night? Think he could get out on his roof and kill them from there.

Larry, his shots would likely be outside shotgun range. He likes to use his M1A, but has a *ahem* assortment of rifles to choose from.:D

Where does one purchase red lights for critters, outside of Amsterdam?:D

Larry Ashcraft
December 27, 2005, 06:29 PM
Where does one purchase red lights for critters
I've had good luck with the transparent red film made for use in copiers. Just unscrew the lens on your Streamlight or similar and put a piece in there. Also, Wally World sporting goods department has a swivel head flashlight with interchangeable red and green lens covers.

And to answer your question in my thread, yes, I have fired that rifle before :D . Built it 20 years ago. Its favorite load is a max charge of H4350 under a 100 gr Ballistic Tip (3300 fps).

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=17329&d=1097202200

El Tejon
December 27, 2005, 07:16 PM
Larry, so, could Matt put a red film filter on his spotlight and be effective? Kelly could light them up (or the 7 year old) as Matt shot them?

The .25-'06 is a fine round and that is sound load. I have one but it rarely sees action.

Larry Ashcraft
December 27, 2005, 07:47 PM
Hey! ART!

El T's got questions. :D

Art posted once before that he watches for eyes in the fringes of the red light and tries not to shine the light directly on them. I suppose a good scope and some moonlight would help. I've always been afraid to use a rifle at night because the neighbors have livestock around.

The other night, my son was staying here and he shined the 10 million CP spotlight on a calf carcass about 400 yards away. Several 'yotes were on the carcass and they all ran off except one bold one. He still wasn't able to get a shot off though.

Bigreno
December 27, 2005, 07:53 PM
Spotlighting coyotes and using a call or bait is the best way to hunt them after dark (pending local laws). The way to do it is use the red filter and be sure not to shine the beam directly at the dog. Shine it over his head and keep him in the "halo" of the light. This way he is iluminated but you don't burn his eyes and as long as he stays in the light he won't be able to see you behind it.

Here is a good place for you to find information. Texas Predator Posse (http://texaspredatorposse.ipbhost.com/index.php?)

NMshooter
December 27, 2005, 08:08 PM
You can make your own red filter using the red colored brake light tape.

Difficult to get a light with enough range to really see the whole yote, but the eyes do tend to show up all right.;) Works with the white light on the rifle, if you are already pointing roughly at him. Taking any kind of shots in the dark is difficult at best, though. I miss more often than hit.:o

You should be tacticool and get a 3 gen NV scope, makes night time predator control much easier. Even from helicopters with miniguns, or so I have been told...:evil:

Crosshair
December 27, 2005, 09:21 PM
I have a 4x ATN Aries 390 Paladin NVD on my Marlin 880SS rifle. (It's amasing what you can find on clearance.:D ) I can plink pop cans at 30 yards easy in total darkness (Need the IR unit on though). Coyotes are a little bigger so it should be easier to hit them. I am waiting to use this setup on rabbits when they become as numerous as flies in the summer.:evil: I tested the scope before I mounted it on the rifle and I was able to get within spitting distance of the rabbits without them running away. (You can get really close to them if they think you can't see them.) I converted the scope to take AA batteries because 123 Lithiums are so expencive. If you where closer I could lend it to you.

Art Eatman
December 28, 2005, 12:02 AM
Yeah, the edge of a light's circle of illumination is best, coupled with a red lens-cover. High candle-power is NOT necessary.

I often use a 20,000 CP Streamlight when first calling, instead of a Q-Beam. It's helpful to let life get all complicated and use a two-cell or three-cell "dim-ish" flashlight when the coyote really comes in close. (Generally, I work from my truck. Carrying "stuff" isn't a problem.)

I generally sweep the light fairly quickly across the countryside. If I pick up the gleam of eyes, I don't go back to them. I'll call a bit and sweep again, while getting ready to shoot if the coyote is being helpful.

I've often held the flashlight against the forearm and then just pressed the button when I think I'm close to on-target. Or, turn the light on while holding high, and after picking up the eyes in the edge of the beam, drop down to aim and then shoot.

It all gets more difficult after a few have been shot. Worse if they're shot AT and missed. They don't believe the call is a wounded rabbit, anymore.

Speaking of calls: I like the wounded rabbit call. I try the jackrabbit call, here, and also the cottontail. (We have both.) When I start calling, I'm fairly loud for a bit, and then soften the volume. You might scare off Ol' Wiley if he thinks it's a 400-pound rabbit. :) I've found that they either show up within a minute or three, or not at all. I've used tapes, but it's generally more hassle. The Burnham Brothers tape works.

If you set up on some sort of stand, remember that although a coyote may start out by coming straight in to the call, they tend to circle to have the wind in their face for the final approach. Ya gotta figure a spot with this in mind, where they're sorta forced to come in crosswind and not smell you..

Time of day: When there's a lot of moon, I've had good luck in evening toward dark, and in the early morning during first light through sunup. During the dark of the moon, those times haven't been as good; around ten PM seems to work better. My purely-opinion theory is that with a lot of moon, prey animals can see better and thus avoid the coyote. So, the coyotes have to work harder and longer to get a meal. Just a notion...

Out in the back country where coyotes don't really know what people are, I've called them up to the truck in mid-afternoon. It's a hoot to have one go round and round the truck, barking and yipping. Sort of a "Where's my rabbit? You promised me a rabbit! $#%@$!"

And then there's just plain old luck. Coyotes do wander out in the broad open in the middle of the day, sometimes. There's just no telling. Not all of them have read my book, "What Coyotes Do".

Art

delloro
December 28, 2005, 12:55 AM
curtilage? they had better have a warrant.... :neener:

gunfan
December 28, 2005, 01:47 AM
I have a 4x ATN Aries 390 Paladin NVD on my Marlin 880SS rifle. (It's amasing what you can find on clearance.:D ) I can plink pop cans at 30 yards easy in total darkness (Need the IR unit on though). Coyotes are a little bigger so it should be easier to hit them. I am waiting to use this setup on rabbits when they become as numerous as flies in the summer.:evil: I tested the scope before I mounted it on the rifle and I was able to get within spitting distance of the rabbits without them running away. (You can get really close to them if they think you can't see them.) I converted the scope to take AA batteries because 123 Lithiums are so expencive. If you where closer I could lend it to you.

Indeed, NVD scopes are 'da bomb' and can effectively arrange for you to engage in predator control in total darkness (providing that you use a battery operated IR emitting lamp.) While the 3rd generation devices are the most expensive (and quite sensitive) they also are of the best advantage in near total darkness.

You are also best served if you have a flash suppressor on your rifle as the muzzle flash can wreak havoc on these units. Loads using flash-suppressed propellants are recommended.

Your IR "light source" is best if you place it AWAY from your NVD sope. This will permit you to obtain the best sight picture without "washing out" the target image.

Scott

Crosshair
December 28, 2005, 02:35 AM
You are also best served if you have a flash suppressor on your rifle as the muzzle flash can wreak havoc on these units. Loads using flash-suppressed propellants are recommended.
Already tested that. With the "long" 22" barrel and the fact that it is only a .22LR there is NO flash whatsoever and I was using regular Remington brick ammo. I was woried about that, but even through the scope there is no flash. Thanks for the concern though.

El Tejon
December 28, 2005, 01:53 PM
Thanks, all, for the suggestions. We will get to work.:)

Crosshair, thanks for the night vision recommendation. Matt has been wanting a NVD for his suppressed 10/22, I'll tell him to look into it.

Gordon
December 29, 2005, 12:54 AM
I have my green Choate stocked, green tefloned 1100 Remington 12ga with a 20" barrel and improved cylinder choke. It has a Sibir Yukon Gen 1+ 3x NV scope with a really powerfull IR illuminator on a detachable Weaver see under mount. It looks like daylight at 75 yards with the IR on!. I shoot coyotes, bob cats , feral dogs ect. that come for my livestock at night. I just got a coyote about a week ago with it at 2am in the morning. I could hear the horses acting up, my dog started growling in the house and the geese started honking. There were 3 yotes, this time I only got one:( , (my record is 3!) but he BOUNCED with a well centered cloud of plated #1 buck at the 50 yards from my position behind a tree to the wall of the chicken coop they were digging under. I shot twice more (the heavy 1100 is quick and has a 7shot mag) but was shooting low because I didn't want to spray the horse pasture (!) with buckshot.
I HAVE called yotes in over bait with this and it is THE bomb IF I can get within 60 yards- I have shot slugs in it and they can do the deed at 75 yards if I'm careful! Ya have to be EXTRA careful at night !:evil:

Matt G
December 29, 2005, 08:01 AM
Ya have to be EXTRA careful at night
Words to heed, friends!!!

"Always be certain of your target and be certain of your backstop" is probably the most important of the Four Rules (http://www.thefiringline.com/Misc/safetyrules.html) when you're varminting at night.

Texas Parks and Wildlife makes an excellent suggestion in their 2005-2006 Outdoor Annual (Hunting/Fishing Regulations) (http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/publications/annual/): http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=33188&stc=1&d=1135857376

Good advice. There are a lot of people who don't realize that the best legal methods to hunt varmints involve hunting at night, and who associate all spotlights and red lights with "poachers." A quick courtesy call to your local game warden, S.O., and local neighbors can sure head off some potentially tense and possibly dangerous confrontations that are guaranteed to blow your hunt. Keep in mind, too, that the guy who calls the cops on you may honestly have your best interests at heart, but is just a little uninformed. If you can get cell phone coverage where you're yodel-dog hunting, I'd strongly suggest carrying a cell phone, too, on vibrate.

El Tejon
December 29, 2005, 10:18 AM
Matt G, wise words and thanks for the reminder.:)

Where my brother lives, gunfire 24/7 is the norm. We were out Chirstmas morning, as I was waliking in and out of the house hauling in food and presents, I could hear the distant crack of something.:D

His nearest neighbor has sheep and chickens. He supports all coyote eradication efforts.:)

DWHARP
December 30, 2005, 01:35 PM
My buddy and I have been hunting coyotes in Illinois for years and this year we have killed 11 so far. We have used everything and found for sure numbers bait is the best. Roadkill deer, dead hogs, cattle, anything we can get our hands on. We hunt most at night and we have built huts for us to sit in over our bait piles. High powered rifles scoped with 3x9 40 power gives you enough lite to be sure of what you are shooting at. Be responsable and know your area, you are hunting at nite keep in mind, be safe!! You'll have loads of fun, and killem all.

Flatfender
December 30, 2005, 03:40 PM
There is a good source on Predator Masters Forums called "Night Calling".

http://www.predatormastersforums.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php

redneck2
December 30, 2005, 06:26 PM
Uh...

why wait for night?? My son-in-law and I hunt coyotes with a predator caller (CD version of the Lohman). Better during the coldest months of the winter. Colder it is, the more coyotes eat

Get the DVD "Calling All Coyotes" or "The Verminators" by Randy Anderson. Shows over 50 kills. All daytime. We just got a new DVD by Byron South called "Calling in the Thick Stuff".

There's also a magazine Predator Masters that has a lot of info. Also go to the Coyote Gods website.

In this area use cottontail rabbit, woodpecker, or puppie distress calls. The bait pile idea works great, but it will draw more coyotes.

Art's right about the scent thing. Typically they'll get maybe 50-75 yards out depending on the terrain and go down wind. One sniff and they're gone. If you've got two guys, set one downwind maybe 25-50 yards.

Use a smaller rifle (.17 HMR, .22 mag, etc.) or a shotgun with 4 buck or BB lead to save the pelts (during the winter). They're going for $15-20 right now. Maybe the optimum for shotgun load is the new "Dead Coyote" that is "T" sized tungsten. Supposed to be good for 60+ yards. Haven't tried it yet

The red light thing will work, but it's a lot easier in the daytime IMO. Oh, take some crow decoys and CD's at the same time. If you don't get a 'yote (or even if you do), call the crows in. You've got your camo, guns, and caller anyway. Make it a two-fer

You've got a lot of fun on your hands. If you were closer I'd be real happy to help you out

TexasRifleman
December 30, 2005, 07:16 PM
Back before the animal rights folks came along, I made VERY good money in high school off of coyote pelts.

We would hang low candle power flashlights with the red film mentioned over the area baited. The bait being back then usually a battery powered cassette player. 3 or 4 lights would light up a surprisingly large area when that's the only light out there. Your eyes get accustomed to it fairly fast.

Decent optics allowed plenty of vision into the area for easy pickings.

We had to do it at night because we were in class all day.

I think they were paying $25 a pelt then, and you could usually get another 5 or 10 from the landowner.
Ahh those were the days..... Endless flow of beer and ammo money :)

hub
December 30, 2005, 08:07 PM
hey el tejon do u know the laws with nvg in indiana and if there is a season or is anytime of the year for land owners. i live close to blue river well about 20 miles east but i have had the same problems and i'm thinking about a nvg scope for my .223, or .22 mag.

wolf_from_wv
December 31, 2005, 01:36 AM
Here in WV we can use an amber light for coyotes, but have to use .22 rimfire or I think up to #4 shot in a shotgun...

With a 3 million candlepower light, do you notice any smoke coming up off the coyotes? :p

El Tejon
December 31, 2005, 10:59 AM
Hey, hub, how are things? Still raining like you know what out of a boot out there?

The Indiana DNR website has the info you need. http://www.in.gov/dnr/fishwild/huntguide1/hunting1.htm


Season runs October 15, 2005 to March 15, 2006 with no limit. Coyotes are considered nuisance critters and may be taken by landowner at any time (or give note to others so they can kill them).

Man, are they ever thick out where you live. Must be the combination of plenty of cover to hide in and lots of vittles to chomp on.

May the new year bring you fewer coyotes.:D

kudu
December 31, 2005, 09:26 PM
Hey Tejon, where abouts on the Blue River is your brother close to. If I am thinking of the same one that goes through Columbia City, I am not too far from there. Got a 10gauge that needs a workout and a bunch of lead BB shells, or maybe they are #2's. Good to kill to about 75-80 yards. Got a Q-beam and a red lens also, along with predator calls, etc. Been a while since I popped a yote. We have a few around my place, but haven't seen one in the open since this summer.

Balog
January 2, 2006, 01:39 AM
Just curious, but where do ya'll sell the hides? Seems like a nice way to augment the ammo fund while protecting the livestock.You know, once I have an ammo fund and livestock. :rolleyes:

TexasRifleman
January 2, 2006, 06:44 PM
Just curious, but where do ya'll sell the hides? Seems like a nice way to augment the ammo fund while protecting the livestock.You know, once I have an ammo fund and livestock. :rolleyes:


Depends on the area. Most of the buying now is pure bounty. The fur use was impacted pretty heavily by the PETA folks. Prices you see now is purely for the eradication of a harmful varmint.

I don't think anyone is buying the pelts for actual use any longer, at least not around here.

In my case, in Stephens County TX there is a small bounty put together by the ranchers, maybe 5 bucks for a pair of ears last time I asked.

kudu
January 2, 2006, 09:42 PM
Just curious, but where do ya'll sell the hides? Seems like a nice way to augment the ammo fund while protecting the livestock.You know, once I have an ammo fund and livestock.

There are a few fur buyers around, but a lot less than there used to be. I haven't sold any for several years now, but there were 2 I knew of within about 50 miles of me. Many trappers and coon hunters stretch and dry their furs and sell in bulk lots to big buyers or take them to a yearly auction site for furs. I remember making about $1000 about 25 years ago with just 20 traps and about 8 weeks worth of trapping and hunting. I thought I was in the big money at about 14 years old.

If you enjoyed reading about "Coyotes at night?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!