Where retired warbirds go...


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280PLUS
January 3, 2006, 08:03 PM
I know there's at least a couple of pilots around here...

:)

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=33426&d=1136336598

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Thefabulousfink
January 3, 2006, 08:07 PM
It's sad to see so many B-52's scrapped, they were the Air Force's most useful plane next to the A-10.:(

Ravenslair
January 3, 2006, 08:08 PM
One of the greatest planes created. Hopefully they (those in the picture) will enjoy a very long retirement, but it is nice to know we can always call them back to duty if needed.

JCM298
January 3, 2006, 08:57 PM
That photo could have been taken at Davis-Monthan (D-MAFB) here in Tucson. Years ago, the media showed a lot of them being chopped up after the treaty with the USSR. Driving down Irvington Rd, which borders the base, is interesting because of all the out-of-service planes that are stored there.

The AF gives tours of the "bone yard" but they call it a much fancier name. A lot of the present armed forces planes are kept flying by parts pulled from the stored planes.

John

UberPhLuBB
January 3, 2006, 09:04 PM
I love looking at this place. Scroll all around.

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=Davis-Monthan+Air+Force+Base&ll=32.151354,-110.824456&spn=0.005782,0.012883&t=k&hl=en

JCM298
January 3, 2006, 09:11 PM
UberPhLuBB,

Yep, that's D-M.

John

matis
January 3, 2006, 09:20 PM
One of the greatest planes created. Hopefully they (those in the picture) will enjoy a very long retirement, but it is nice to know we can always call them back to duty if needed.





Is this true? Are you sure?




Would seem like such a terrible waste, otherwise? Unfortunately we might need them, again.





matis

Dave P
January 3, 2006, 09:23 PM
So, it looks like tall tails out there, which says they are "D" models - very old.

But it also appears that they have chin electronics (FLIR and optics?). I thought those where only G and H models ( the latest).

I did some work for Boeing on those beasts about 30 yrs ago in Wichita - those were the days! No open bars, but lots of 3.2% "beer"!

Dave

Lennyjoe
January 3, 2006, 09:44 PM
Old picture. Might be around 10 left in the yard if that. I'll drive around tomorrow and see how many are left.

Preacherman
January 3, 2006, 09:55 PM
Looking at the number of planes in that Google satellite shot, and figuring on their purchase cost in modern money, there's the entire national budgets of more than a few Third World nations sitting out there in the desert! :what:

JCM298
January 3, 2006, 10:07 PM
Lennyjoe is the expert on that since he's stationed there. What's the military name of the "boneyard"?

When you go to the picture, scroll down and you may be able to see the Pima Air and Space Museum, south of Valencia Rd, between Wilmot and Craycroft. They have planes going back to the 30's and a bunch of modern stuff, too.

John

Hacker15E
January 3, 2006, 10:15 PM
What's the military name of the "boneyard"?

AMARC

FPrice
January 3, 2006, 10:27 PM
Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Center

http://www.amarcexperience.com/

Gunsnrovers
January 3, 2006, 10:38 PM
I was going to school at the U of A when an A-7 Corsair coming in to be mothballed flamed out on approach. Pilot was able to steer it into a school (it was a weekend thankfully) and miss the houses nearby before he punched out.

Back when I was there in the late 1980's, there were tons of B52's waiting for the chopper. Our dorm was right in the flight path. When B52's and C5's flew over, pictures would vibrate off the walls, etc. That place was busy ALL the time.

If you go to google earth and check out the satelite photos, you can see all the ones they cut up and leave out there for satelite verification.

Lots of interesting aircraft. Not all USAF. Some USN aircraft as well.

Unisaw
January 4, 2006, 01:47 AM
Great post! Thanks for sharing.

Old NFO
January 4, 2006, 09:36 AM
That is Davis Monthan AFB, and I have been there to "borrow" parts for the EC-121 years ago, and later P-3's. :evil: Years ago, we were wondering around and saw Spirit of Battan (DC-6) that MacArther flew around in, we got in it and it was still pretty much outfitted as it had been in the late 40's early 50's, of course I was too stoopid to take a camera with me...:banghead:
There are some Navy acft in there with less than 1000 hours total time on them (specifically S-3's and F-18A's). There are also some NAVY FB-111's (appx 30) in there with less than 500 hours on them. The Navy is currently bringing some of the P-3A's out for refit, as they have much lower TT than many of the current Fleet birds and the refit is considerably (~$5M) cheaper than rewinging a current P-3.

ravinraven
January 4, 2006, 10:34 AM
...B, C, D, E, and F had long tails in the early days. I think the A did too, but there weren't a lot of them built. I've heard that the H's have been fitted with a long tail lately for better stability. Anyone know for sure?

I saw "Gunny" on mail call joy riding on an H a while ago and the thing had a short tail.

I've rode a million miles on D's and G's. That's about a quarter of the distance the real B-52 troops flew.

I got a kick out of some nitwit alarmist back in early '03 announcing that 1200 B-52s had left ********** for Iraq. That would be quite a trick, methinks. What was it--746?? of all descriptions were built?

rr

Lupinus
January 4, 2006, 10:46 AM
Planes (just like ships) are often ecomisioned when not needed and just sit around untill needed agian. It's also cheaper to salvage spare parts then to buy new ones.

Pilot
January 4, 2006, 11:04 AM
Great info on a grea airplane. Its the B-52 that makes the enemy want to surrender. Thanks guys.

Oldtimer
January 4, 2006, 12:05 PM
While it is a bit "sad", it's also "good" that those aircraft have been put to pasture. They served this country well, but metal fatigue is something that you don't want flying over you, or for flying in. At least they will be chopped for future usage....and I'm sure that several will be kept for viewing.

There's a restaurant, called the "Proud Bird", that is underneath the approach pattern of Los Angeles International Airport. They have numerous war birds on display in the back of the restaurant, and two are "flying" from elevated pedestals in the front parking lot. P-51, P-47, Mig-15, F4-U, X-1, X-15, and several others.....but not enough room for a B-52.

Lupinus
January 4, 2006, 12:18 PM
We had a resturant near me when I lived in NJ that looked like a barn, on the outside was the tail end of a Camel (old WW1 era bi plane) and on the inside was the front end, was good for a few laughs.

50 Shooter
January 4, 2006, 01:56 PM
I can see this one any day of the week.:)

http://www.edwards.af.mil/museum/docs_html/blackbird_airpark.html

el44vaquero
January 4, 2006, 03:02 PM
You guys should google earth this thing. It's really something to see all those planes out there. My uncle was in the airforce and retired one of his fighters out there. Was really an emotional thing for him.

el44vaquero
January 4, 2006, 03:08 PM
Do these look like A-10s to you?

33454

dasmi
January 4, 2006, 03:11 PM
Yes.

Pilot
January 4, 2006, 04:35 PM
While it is a bit "sad", it's also "good" that those aircraft have been put to pasture. They served this country well, but metal fatigue is something that you don't want flying over you, or for flying in.

That's not necesarily true. With proper maintenance there is no real age limit on many airframes. With wing spar replacements and other repairs, you can fly many airplanes a long, long time. Lots of DC-3's still flying as transports and the last ones were made in the 1940's.

UberPhLuBB
January 4, 2006, 04:45 PM
That's not necesarily true. With proper maintenance there is no real age limit on many airframes. With wing spar replacements and other repairs, you can fly many airplanes a long, long time. Lots of DC-3's still flying as transports and the last ones were made in the 1940's.

But DC3's don't do barrel rolls at mach 2 while firing missiles. :)

tegemu
January 4, 2006, 07:33 PM
You can bet your Bippy that B-52's don't either but their Airframes can be Zero Timed. (Made practically good as new).

atomchaser
January 4, 2006, 07:56 PM
They do regularly take parts from the old aircraft for models that are still in the inventory. They also store all the specialized tooling to reproduce certain of the aircraft there. There is a very careful process that is preformed when the aircraft are put into storage to perserve them. Last time I was there they were pulling F-4's out of storage and putting them back in flyable condition to be used as target drones.

Adventurer_96
January 5, 2006, 01:41 AM
Regarding the F-4s, they're still doing that, with BAE Systems in Mojave, CA doing the majority of the work.

I delivered an airplane down there a few months back, it was a very cool experience although I didn't get a chance to taxi it into the facility proper. Still, it was cool to be the last pilot to fly that airplane.

It's one of the only DoD operations that actually turns a profit every year. Quite a place, we're lucky to have it, and you'd be surprised at what goes in there. Perhaps more what comes out.

Unisaw
January 5, 2006, 01:58 AM
Old NFO: I didn't realize the Navy actually took delivery of the F-111. Do you know the story behind that?

No_Brakes23
January 5, 2006, 04:10 AM
Speaking of old planes, I saw an honest to god U2 land at Miramar the other day. It was bearing NASA markings.

AZ Jeff
January 5, 2006, 12:38 PM
That's not necesarily true. With proper maintenance there is no real age limit on many airframes. With wing spar replacements and other repairs, you can fly many airplanes a long, long time. Lots of DC-3's still flying as transports and the last ones were made in the 1940's.
Airframe design has advanced considerably since the 1930's and 40's. In those days, structural design was done with plans for an infinite life (no fatigue limit) on the airframe.

Nowadays, all new aircraft structures are designed with finite life (fatigue limit) planned into the structure. While it's true that anything can be rebuilt, it's a matter of cost.

MrTuffPaws
January 5, 2006, 01:10 PM
Do these look like A-10s to you?

33454

Yeah, and check out the 15s just north of them.

George Hill
January 5, 2006, 01:42 PM
I've heard some folks refer to that airfield as the "Field of Dreams".

Wonder how much a mothballed A-10 would cost... hmmm...

ScottsGT
January 5, 2006, 02:37 PM
The A-10's are not being scrapped, just stored until needed.

Lennyjoe
January 5, 2006, 04:18 PM
The A-10's are not being scrapped, just stored until needed.
At least some of them are. Won't give specific numbers but there are several rows of cocooned hogs. Others are for parts.

Tim L
January 5, 2006, 04:19 PM
A-10s and B-52s are going through SLEP (service life extension program) programs to keep them around another 20 - 30 years because there just isn't anything available that can do their job. C-130s are still being built for the same reason. All the advancements in technology and we can't top 30 - 50 year old designs. Imagine fighting Vietnam with Sopwith Camels. Gotta love them 'hogs and BUFFs.

Tim (certifiable warbird nut)

Old NFO
January 5, 2006, 08:53 PM
Old NFO: I didn't realize the Navy actually took delivery of the F-111. Do you know the story behind that?
I'll have to dig it up, but basically in the late 60's/70's the Navy was directed to procure two squadrons worth of FB-111B's to meet end strength requirements for the airframe. However, the FB-111B could not be refitted for carrier operations without significant loss of bombing capability and/or fuel load due to beefing up/strengthening the gear, tailhook and ancillary things (like equipment racks, etc.) Here's a quote on it...

The F-111B, developed for the U.S. Navy, was canceled before its production. The Navy F-111B was found to be too heavy for carrierborne operations. A larger wing was developed for the F-111B, with a span of 70 feet in the fully extended (16° sweep) setting -- 7 feet more than the F-111A. The Navy's Grumman F-14 Tomcat was designed in 1968 to take the place of the controversial F-111B, then under development for the Navy's carrier fighter inventory.

So bottom line, "officially" cancelled, unofficially, Navy got 30 and sent them to the bone yard...

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