Which caliber will end up being easier for reloading?


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Winzeler
January 5, 2006, 10:29 AM
Hey all, this is my first post here. Why didn't anyone tell me about this place?

Anyway, I'm looking at doing two different things this year, but they're related enough that they kind of depend on each other. I want to start reloading this year, specifically to save money on shooting my .357 SIG, .40, and 9mm. I also am looking into having a rifle built. For the rifle I'm trying to decide between three calibers: .300 Ultra, .338 Ultra, and .338 Lapua. I would also like to hand load for this gun. Should I narrow down my decision on which caliber to go with based on reloading information and die availability. I have never seen any dies available for the Lapua, and it seems like the .338 Ultras will be tough to find to.

Could some of you more experience fellas send me down the right track here?
Thanks in advance

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Grumulkin
January 5, 2006, 11:00 AM
Dies should be available for all the calibers you mentioned from the major manufacturers. If they aren't available "off the shelf," then they can easily be custom made for you.

Since all the choices you mention are supported by major gun manfucturers, you should be able to find brass without having to make it yourself. I haven't personally priced it or tried to buy it but 338 Lapua Magnum brass may be more expensive and less available than the Remington offerings. If I were you I would price brass and check availability locally and from mail order companies before making my decision.

The current Hornady Handbook of Cartridge Reloading has published loads for the cartridges you are considering.

As far as brass sources are concerned, a couple of places I would check are:

www.midwayusa.com

www.natchezss.com

dakotasin
January 5, 2006, 11:20 AM
i have never seen anything lapua available on the shelf at the shops i frequent. but i do see rum brass, dies, etc on the shelf. i don't see load info being a problem for any.

remember the 338 rum is a shorter version of the 300 rum. not by much, but a little less powder cap.

make your decision based on purpose of the gun, and what your gut tells you to want. if you are leaning 338 rum, and you get talked into a 300 rum, you will never be completely satisfied w/ the rifle.

g56
January 5, 2006, 03:39 PM
The 9mm and the 40 are easy to reload, the 357 Sig will be a bear due to it being a bottleneck case, probably more trouble than it would be worth

countertop
January 5, 2006, 03:51 PM
As someone commented on my blog - reloading saves you money like bloglines cuts down on your blogging.

P0832177
January 5, 2006, 05:16 PM
You are not shopping in the right stores! The Gunstop in Mtka, MN has all kinds of Lapua stuff! Bullets and Brass! Bullets by the carton if need be! Brass up the whazoo!
Gunstop Reloading Supplies Inc.
14410 Excelsior Blvd.
Minnetonka, MN 55345
1-800-645-7644
(952) 474-0211
www.gunstop.com


i have never seen anything lapua available on the shelf at the shops i frequent. but i do see rum brass, dies, etc on the shelf. i don't see load info being a problem for any.

remember the 338 rum is a shorter version of the 300 rum. not by much, but a little less powder cap.

make your decision based on purpose of the gun, and what your gut tells you to want. if you are leaning 338 rum, and you get talked into a 300 rum, you will never be completely satisfied w/ the rifle.

Winzeler
January 5, 2006, 06:06 PM
As someone commented on my blog - reloading saves you money like bloglines cuts down on your blogging.
Thanks for the help guys. By the way, cost is what prevents me from shooting as much as I like. I guess it's 6 of one 1/2 dozen of the other. Because it's cheaper, I'm able to do more.

MarshallDodge
January 5, 2006, 06:17 PM
9mm is definitely going to be the cheapest but you can buy it loaded for pretty cheap. I still load my own because I like to tailor the loads to my guns and it's definitely more accurate that way.

There is more to loading rifle rounds. You must lube the cases, check the cases for stretch and trim if necessary, etc.

antsi
January 5, 2006, 07:36 PM
The 9mm and the 40 are easy to reload, the 357 Sig will be a bear due to it being a bottleneck case, probably more trouble than it would be worth

357 SIG is the first caliber I learned to reload on. I had help from an experienced reloader and that did make a difference. The bottleneck does add some "issues" but none are insurmountable.

As far as "more trouble than it's worth," I don't know because 357 SIG is ridiculously overpriced in most stores and it is one of the calibers you can really save money on by reloading as opposed to paying retail. (Obviously ordering bulk ammo changes the math on that).

I don't know about 9mm. There are so many deals on cheap 9mm out there you may be hard pressed to really save $ by reloading.

dakotasin
January 5, 2006, 10:03 PM
p08- no, i'm not going to drive all the way to minnetonka for anything...

MNgoldenbear
January 7, 2006, 04:59 PM
Aw, come on. It's a nice drive. Can't be more than 6 or 7 hours if you're on the east side of SD. :evil:

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