lead poisoning


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jmorris
January 5, 2006, 05:16 PM
I was wondering if any other shooters have had themselves tested for lead poisoning? Ive been shooting IDPA for about 2 years and after a recent blood test found out I have lead poisoning at 20mg/dl. All of my shooting for the past 8 months has been at outdoor ranges.

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rchernandez
January 5, 2006, 05:25 PM
There has been a lot of traffic on this topic on the Bullseye list. I believe that latest studies show it less inhalation and more ingestion of lead that has been the culprit. Very important to wash hands with soap and cold water after shooting and before eating (of course). Use of wet-wipes for lead like D-Lead. Using gloves when cleaning guns, as lead residue in cleaning patches do deposit tons of it on your skin. Need to develop safe handling procedures if you reload...lead rounds.

Good news is lead levels in blood can lower with all the right precautions (and still continue shooting) but it takes a little longer to go away.

slopemeno
January 5, 2006, 05:35 PM
I was in the same boat. I had done a major reloading area cleanup while I was between jobs. When I got the required physical from the battery shop I was starting at I came back at the same level you're at. The companies insurance almost wouldnt let me be hired. After that I was tested every 6 mos and i kept very close eye on my level until I left the biz five years ago. Dont let people tell you its no big deal-you can bring lead home to your kids this way.
Gloves and d-lead are all great ideas, but simply washing your hands after handling your gear (think about it: rangebag, clothing, hat, those jeans you always wear to the range, the interior of your car where you touch) will make a huge difference.

dracphelan
January 5, 2006, 05:40 PM
This is a great reminder to us all. Don't eat or drink while doing reloading activities, and wash your hands! This just doesn't apply to shooting. I think I've avoided the flu for the past 5 years by washing my hands frequently. It takes 30 seconds and greatly improves your health.

jtward01
January 5, 2006, 06:14 PM
A worker at an indoor range here in Tampa was severely poisoned by lead and almost died. She was hospitalized for six weeks until they could flush the lead out of her system. Much of it was her own fault, though. When the boss wasn't around she wouldn't use the mask or overalls when sweeping out the shooting lanes. Several of us tried to warn her, but she said it was too hot. She died of a heart attack not too long after the poisoning and I've often wondered if her body was just so weakened from the lead that it led to the heart problems.

Poor thing, she had a rough time working at that range. One night at closing three guys pushed their way in trying to rob the place. She'd already locked the rental guns and cash in the gun safe and as she was trying to flee from the store one of the robbers shot her with a .22LR pistol. Fortunately, the bullet passed through the soft tissue just above her left hip without causing much damage. The wound was more painful than serious. She was back to work in two days.

JV_2108
January 5, 2006, 06:46 PM
This is a great reminder to us all. Don't eat or drink while doing reloading activities, and wash your hands! This just doesn't apply to shooting. I think I've avoided the flu for the past 5 years by washing my hands frequently. It takes 30 seconds and greatly improves your health.

Great post and topic. Great info for a newbie (such as myself).

Thanks

AZ Jeff
January 5, 2006, 07:20 PM
I was wondering if any other shooters have had themselves tested for lead poisoning? I’ve been shooting IDPA for about 2 years and after a recent blood test found out I have lead poisoning at 20mg/dl. All of my shooting for the past 8 months has been at outdoor ranges.
To the best of my knowledge, your level is not considered "real high" by most sources. See below for details.
****************
The following is taken from:
RISKS OF LEAD POISONING IN FIREARMS INSTRUCTORS AND THEIR STUDENTS
by Anthony M. Gregory, Copyright 1990 by THE ASLET JOURNAL, March/April 1990 Volume 4 Issue 2
Lead exposure and lead poisoning are largely problems peculiar to industrialized civilizations. Average levels of lead in the blood of adult Americans runs from about 5 to 10 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood (5-10 mcg/dl), which is already much higher than "normal". Because lead is absorbed by the bones and stored there quite tenaciously, archaeologists have been able to examine the bones of ancient people in pre-industrialized societies and estimate their lead levels. Ancient people tended to have lead levels around 0 to 2 mcg/dl -- much lower than modern Americans.

The first detrimental effects of lead are seen as an increase in blood pressure, starting at a blood lead level of about 7 mcg/dl. Blood pressure continues to rise as the lead level increases, indicating that lead is slightly toxic at almost any level.

The first level OSHA considered "elevated" in adults and used by most medical labs is 40 mcg/dl. At this level, most people will show hematologic (blood chemistry) changes, and adults will exhibit low level symptoms. OSHA requires continuous medical monitoring of employees who have tested at this level. The level of 60 mcg/dl is considered to be nominal lead poisoning, and OSHA requires removal from the source of exposure. At this level, almost everyone will exhibit symptoms of lead poisoning, while some will exhibit severe symptoms. At a level of about 75 mcg/dl, or if symptoms are severe, many physicians will want to intervene with a procedure called "chelation therapy".

Children are much more sensitive to lead, and the Center for Disease Control considers a level of 25 mcg/dl to be toxic in children (they are considering lowering this to 20 mcg/dl -- half the adult level).
****************

This is not to say that 20mcg/dl is not a notable increase over the general populus, but it's not considered elevated by most standards.

esheato
January 5, 2006, 09:43 PM
Yup...I've been tested. 35 mcg/dl a little over a year ago...not sure what it is now.

Here's the link: Lead Poisoning (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=104846)

Ed

VARifleman
January 5, 2006, 11:28 PM
I got mine checked and it was at 9 ug/dl, a little higher than it had been, but they don't start to worry until it gets around 25+. You don't have lead poisoning, although you should get a followup in about 6 months.

neoncowboy
January 5, 2006, 11:39 PM
I've been using this product for about 9 months. A good friend of mine saw his lead levels rise, began taking Betagard and within a month lead levels were *minute*!

It was formulated by the inventor of chemotherapy and his suggestion was that it serve as the antidote to chemo.

betagard (http://www.gnld.com/store/Product.aspx?STORE_ID=1&CATEGORY_ID=1024&NAV_CATEGORY_ID=1014&product_id=10054)

The increasing presence of toxic chemicals in our environment increases the risk of life-threatening illness. GNLDs Betagard offers nutritional protection. Its synergistic blend of antioxidant and detoxifying nutrients helps the body neutralize and metabolize toxic materials.

Taurus 66
January 6, 2006, 12:33 AM
I wonder if one side effect of lead poisoning is

Actually I lost my train of thought. I'll get back to you on this.

hso
January 6, 2006, 12:46 AM
Lead exposure has been discussed extensivly in former threads. If you'd like to read those you can search for the topic under the general forum.

I'd like to thank you folks for bringing the topic up again since we have so many new members and exposure is not difficult to control.

One of the local competetive shooters is undergoing chelation to reduce his lead blood levels.

rchernandez
January 6, 2006, 12:47 AM
I wonder if one side effect of lead poisoning is

Actually I lost my train of thought. I'll get back to you on this.


...reloading before you were even a teenager?

Jayman
January 6, 2006, 03:34 PM
I emailed back and forth very briefly with Brian Enos about this. It is a SERIOUS topic. He said that almost every pro shooter out there has some lead horror story. You need to watch your levels carefully, and if they start to rise, take steps to keep the problem at bay. I tested out at 34 mcg/dl about 1.5 years ago. Since then I've been wearing a respirator at the range. I tested at 19 a year ago, and 14 six months ago. I'd love to be back in the single digits, which is where we should all be.

Poodleshooter
January 6, 2006, 04:30 PM
I tested at 11mcg about 4 years back. At the time, I was shooting (some indoors) reloading and casting lead bullets. No one seemed alarmed in the least.

Jayman
January 6, 2006, 04:42 PM
I tested at 11mcg about 4 years back. At the time, I was shooting (some indoors) reloading and casting lead bullets. No one seemed alarmed in the least.
A lot of doctors have very little understanding of this issue unless they've dealt with workers and OSHA issues. I had to educate MY doc about lead. Don't let a medical professional's demeanor determine your response to your health.

answerguy
January 6, 2006, 04:59 PM
I wonder if one side effect of lead poisoning is

Actually I lost my train of thought. I'll get back to you on this.

Could it be drain bamage?

ARperson
January 6, 2006, 09:24 PM
Never been tested.

But lead is the major reason I'm not shooting for the next 9 or so months. Just not worth the risk.

pax
January 6, 2006, 09:38 PM
ARperson ~

Congratulations. :cool:

pax

AFhack
January 6, 2006, 10:32 PM
Never been tested.

But lead is the major reason I'm not shooting for the next 9 or so months. Just not worth the risk.


??????????

"never been tested" and then "lead is the major reason I'm not shoooting..."?


ARperson - I'm sorry but I fail to follow the logic here. Can you elaborate?

JohnKSa
January 6, 2006, 10:49 PM
The big hint/clue was the comment about 9 months. ;)

Rock and Glock
January 6, 2006, 11:05 PM
Never been tested.

But lead is the major reason I'm not shooting for the next 9 or so months. Just not worth the risk.

Congratulations!!! :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :)

Highland Ranger
January 6, 2006, 11:07 PM
re 9 months . . .

I missed it to and I have five of them . . . .

Mighty Hd
January 6, 2006, 11:44 PM
What if you shoot @ indoor ranges? How about the smoke, etc. Is there a higher threat?

pax
January 6, 2006, 11:47 PM
Mighty Hd ~

Yes, generally there is, although with really good ventilation you should still be okay.

What I have always understood is that if you can taste the lead in the air, you are getting a pretty large dose of it. Whether that's on an outdoor range or an indoor one, it's not a good thing.

pax

ajkurp
January 7, 2006, 12:31 AM
I've seen the terrible result of lead poisoning in cattle. Oral chelation with Calcium EDTA revived and saved one cow that was so far down with lead poisnoning that she was emaciated, blind and convulsing. About once a year I now take a course of Calcium EDTA. Google Calcuim EDTA and Chelation.

I'm not a doctor. There's a lot more old drunks than there are old doctors. Thanks, Willie.

Jayman
January 7, 2006, 03:02 PM
Mighty Hd ~

Yes, generally there is, although with really good ventilation you should still be okay.

What I have always understood is that if you can taste the lead in the air, you are getting a pretty large dose of it. Whether that's on an outdoor range or an indoor one, it's not a good thing.

pax
That is EXACTLY it. If you leave the range with a sweet taste in the back of your throat, you just ingested a lot of lead. Lead oxides are sweet. (Thus kids eating paint chips with lead in it...) If you're tasting that, it is time for either a new place to shoot or a respirator when you go to the same joint.

Nitrogen
January 7, 2006, 03:07 PM
Does the stuff like purell hand sanitizer work? I hope so because I have been swabbing my hands with it after range sessions... :scrutiny:

Jayman
January 7, 2006, 03:17 PM
Does the stuff like purell hand sanitizer work? I hope so because I have been swabbing my hands with it after range sessions... :scrutiny:
Nowhere near as well as the emulsifying action of soap, water, and scrubbing. Like two-three minutes of it, no less. If you haven't had a chance to honestly do that sort of scrubdown to your hands and face, don't eat until you can, or failing that, consider the knife and fork instead of handling the food.

pax
January 7, 2006, 06:58 PM
Sanitizers only kill germs -- they do not remove particulate matter (such as lead) except perhaps by accident.

In my car I keep a package of baby wipes, a roll of paper towels, and a gallon jug of water. I use a wipie first to get the worst of the grime off and so that my hands aren't too bad touching the jug. Then I drizzle a little water over first one hand & then the other, then scrub hands together while they are dripping wet. Drizzle a bit more water. Scrub, drizzle. Scrub, drizzle again. Dry with a clean paper towel. Then wipe face & blow nose, followed by a final scrub, drizzle, & dry.

It's not as good as 2 minutes under running water with lots of soap, but it is good enough to get me home on.

pax

JohnKSa
January 7, 2006, 10:27 PM
WARNING! This post is written with the express intent to inform and entertain. Due to the differences in human nature, behavior and culture, it is possible that information contained within this post may annoy the reader although that is certainly not the intent of the author. Reading past this point constitutes an agreement by the reader to waive his legal right not to be annoyed by anonymous communication on the internet.

If you do not wish to waive this right, please stop reading at this point and use the ignore feature on this forum to avoid future posts by this author. Thank you.

pax nailed it.

The hand sanitizers are really hand germ killers. They don't do anything to REMOVE anything from your hands, they only kill a large percentage of the microorganisms present.

You need soap and water--or at the very least hand wipes if there are no facilities.

Mighty Hd
January 8, 2006, 10:23 AM
Mighty Hd ~

Yes, generally there is, although with really good ventilation you should still be okay.

What I have always understood is that if you can taste the lead in the air, you are getting a pretty large dose of it. Whether that's on an outdoor range or an indoor one, it's not a good thing.

pax

So what does it "taste" like? Like you have an old penny in your mouth?

The range I frequent to is indoors, you can smell a distinct smell when you walk throught the 2nd door, and the A/C vents have black stuff on them.

It does get quite smokey in there when all 6 lanes are taken up.

1911 guy
January 8, 2006, 10:49 AM
A lot of us reload, many with lead rather than jacketed bullets. Lead exposure can be high around your tumbler, if you use one to remove case lube as a final step. Oh, and ARperson, mucho congrats on the little one on the way. My wife and I have a 16 month old son. The most work and the most fun either of us have ever had.

Biker
January 8, 2006, 10:56 AM
Many years ago, when I first started casting my own bullets, I melted the lead in an enclosed room the first day. I recall becoming very sick with flu-like symptoms for days after that. Big mistake. Luckily, I'm pretty sure that I didn't suffer any permanant drain bamage.
Biker:confused:

hso
January 8, 2006, 12:03 PM
Congratulations ARPerson!

Excellent ventilation is imperitive for anyone where lead may be an issue.

Reloaders and bullet casters should have all their equipment in a fume hood. These are easy to make yourself out of materials as cheap as cast off box fans and cardboard boxes. Just be sure to pull the air through the system and exhaust it outside away from your HVAC system. You should have a large volume of air pulled over your gear.

For shooters, your range should have enough air movement to keep the air clear even during the heaviest range usage. This alone won't guarantee that airborne lead levels are not too high because indoor ranges usually recirculate some of the air to save on heating/cooling costs. This can recirculate the contaminated air unless filtration removes it. You have every reason to ask the range if they've sampled the air and what the air sample results were. Air concentrations should be below 30 micrograms per cubic meter of air (30 g/m3) for an 8 hr day exposure. This is OSHA's threshold for requireing an employer to implement controls for airborne lead. This is well below the Permissible Exposure Limit of 50 g/m3 and is intended to allow an employer to verify their engineering controls are effective without implementing a more extensive lead control program.

The next most important issue realted to lead overexposure is hygiene. Not whether you brush your teeth or wear deodorant, but keeping the lead off of you and thereby out of you. You can do this by washing up to the elbows at the range with copious amounts of tepid water. At home take a good soapy shower (just as the shooter should do when they get home). Not taking any food or drink(or smokes or gum or applying lotion or makeup) into the area where lead might be present. Changing clothes before potentially contaminating yourself, vehicle, home, others. Wash any potentially contaminated clothing by itself and wash it twice. When through run the washing machine again without the clothing to be sure that it's well rinsed out. It may not be practical for shooters going to an indoor range to change clothes before leaving. It is advisable to at least wear a light long sleeved shirt and a hat on the range and put them immediately into a bag upon leaving the range prior to washing up.

Potentially lead contaminated surfaces should be wet cleaned and not swept/dusted. Wet wipes or wet towels work well because you can throw them into a garbage bag and seal it up. Use surface cleaners if you aren't using wep wipes. If you have a HEPA vacuum cleaner like the Nilfisk, you can vac all the surfaces, but you should then wet wipe them to remove material the vac didn't get.

http://www.afscme.org/health/faq-lead.htm is one of the good websites explaining lead exposure issues for folks, but there are scores of good ones available. Others include - http://itrcweb.org/Documents/SMART-2.pdf, http://www.rangeinfo.org/resource_library/resLibDetl.cfm?CAT=Facility%20Management&SubCat=Environmental%20Management,
http://www.health.state.ny.us/nysdoh/lead/shoot.htm, http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/ranges/, http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5423a1.htm, http://www.mass.gov/dos/leaddocs/lead_firing.htm, http://www.mass.gov/dos/iaqdocs/iaq-404.htm,

Kingcreek
January 8, 2006, 12:07 PM
Heavy metal toxicity is serious. and not just lead, but mercury, cadmium, arsenic, aluminum, etc. In different forms, they can be absorbed thru the skin, orally, and from vapor or from outgassing or disturbance of mercury amalgum "silver" dental fillings. It is also injected as common preservatives in drugs and vaccines ie thimerisol and aluminum salts. Many topical antiseptics or salves contain heavy metals including almost all contact lens solutions throughout the 80's and into the 90's as well as some "diaper rash" lotions. There is a decreased ability of the body to release some metals such as lead or aluminum when murcery levels are elevated. Toxic metals can cross the blood-brain barrier and placenta in some chemical forms. the body chemically converts these metals and they can become concentrated in the central nervous system, bone, or fat, as the body loses its ability to mobilize and release them.
Blood tests are not always a reliable assessment of heavy metal tox, nor is hair or tissue analysis by itself. diagnosis of a heavy metal illness can be very complicated and most physicians are uneducated in this area.
The "challenge" tests measuring urine excretion of heavy metals after injections of an agent (such as DMSA/LA) can verify a toxic load but can also be very dangerous.
There are different kinds of chelation therapy, some effective some times, some not at all, and some possibly detrimental.
The Betagard(tm) mentioned in a previous reply is simply a batch of synthetic vitamins sold by what appears to be a multi-level marketing company and is typical of many of the claims and products being sold everywhere. Buyer beware.
Heavy metal exposure is much more common, and detoxification and chelation therapy is much more complicated, than most people realize.
Threads like this should resurface frequently to raise the awareness of the good folks here and elsewhere in the shooting community. Take precautions whenever possible to limit exposure.
(sorry for the sermon- off the soapbox for now)

Jbar4Ranch
January 8, 2006, 01:27 PM
20mg/dl is an acceptable level. I worked at a lead smelter for 23 years and toward the end. our plant medical removal level was 40, and we were allowed to return to work out in the plant when it dropped to below 30. I think the OSHA removal level is 50. I knew a couple people there who could work in contaminated areas and seldom wear their respirator and never end up with elevated blood lead levels. A handful of others, myself included, were just the opposite and couldn't keep our lead levels down no matter what we did and would spend four to six months every year on plant medical removal doing janitorial work in the bath houses/change houses or administrative work in the offices. I developed a perforated septum from exposure to acid fume, cadmium, lead, and copper. The doc says it's not a threat to my health, but it makes my nose give an odd whistle now and then. When I started at the plant back in the 70's, before OSHA regs mandated medical removal at a certain level, respirators were optional and it wasn't uncommon for someone to be 80, 90, or even above 100 on occasion.

Kingcreek
January 8, 2006, 01:40 PM
deleted
sorry, decided to PM instead of thread bending

Mauserguy
January 8, 2006, 03:10 PM
I have a question. I go to an indoor range about once per month, and I reload on occasion, though mostly with jacketed bullets. I really don't want to run to the doctor to get tested, but is there a home test kit I could use on occasion? I know that diabetics have a home test kit, but is there such a thing for lead?
Mauserguy

Kingcreek
January 8, 2006, 04:31 PM
short answer- NO
Heavy metal toxicity in general, and lead specifically, is much more complicated than blood tests alone.
Detoxification/chelation therapy is also very complex.
I don't have all the answers either, but I have some background in biochem/physiology and hundreds of pages of published and unpublished resource material.

Molon Labe
January 8, 2006, 07:13 PM
Is it primarily a concern with lead bullets? What if a person only shoots copper-clad bullets? Is there less of a concern? :confused:

JohnKSa
January 8, 2006, 07:52 PM
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If the bullet is TOTALLY copper clad, lead exposure is reduced somewhat. Most jacketed pistol bullets leave the base exposed.

Then again, some of the lead exposure comes from the lead compounds in the primers. There is debate as to which is most significant. I saw an article some time ago that indicated that the primers were the primary contributors but more recent information I have read seems to indicate the opposite. Either way, it seems clear that it's more than just the bullets.

Of course, this is probably moot if you're shooting at a busy indoor range unless you can get everyone there to use lead free ammo.

hso
January 8, 2006, 07:57 PM
I have a question. I go to an indoor range about once per month, and I reload on occasion, though mostly with jacketed bullets. I really don't want to run to the doctor to get tested, but is there a home test kit I could use on occasion? I know that diabetics have a home test kit, but is there such a thing for lead?
Mauserguy

No, but a blood lead should only be around $50 plus whatever the office visit costs.

hso
January 8, 2006, 08:13 PM
Is it primarily a concern with lead bullets? What if a person only shoots copper-clad bullets? Is there less of a concern? :confused:

Are you saying that you only reload FMJ or are you asking about only shooting FMJ?

If you don't have any exposed lead then you shouldn't have a source for the lead in reloading.

If you have a private range that no one else shoots on then the use of FMJ over exposed lead bullets will have some benefit. OTOH if you have a private range you could just switch to non lead bullets altogether.

If you don't have a private range then it's what you shoot as well as everyone else shoots that provides the exposure.

Lead is in the primer and bullet. If the bullet is jacketed it won't vaporize or abrade any lead upon shooting. If that jacketed bullet strikes a backstop that doesn't rupture the jacket then it doesn't contribute lead to the shooter's environment. That leaves the lead based primer which is ~50% lead. This is near the shooter and contributes to inhaltion as well as ingestion (ingestion if you don't change clothes and wash up). You need very good ventilation to mitigate the exposure from the primer.

If everyone is using FMJ and the backstop doesn't rupture the jacket then the only lead the ventilation system has to deal with is from the primer. If the air is not recirculated or the recirculated portion is adequately filtered then lead exposure is highly reduced.

It is not difficult for indoor ranges to keep the airborne lead levels within acceptable limits. It just costs a little of the profit they're taking from you, the recreational shooter.

obm
January 8, 2006, 09:35 PM
contrary to what its name implies, FMJ bullets don't necessarily have a covered base. they have a metal jacket over the areas which make contact with the rifling, but not necessarily on the base. so when the power ignites it burns off some of the exposed lead base which contributes to the airborne lead problem(in addition to the other lead components of a cartridge).

Molon Labe
January 8, 2006, 10:31 PM
hso:

Thanks for the reply.

I do not reload. I shoot in our backyard. I only shoot milsurp NATO 7.62 X 51 from a FAL. The bullets are copper clad. (Not sure about the bullet base.)

JohnKSa
January 8, 2006, 10:45 PM
WARNING! This post is written with the express intent to inform and entertain. Due to the differences in human nature, behavior and culture, it is possible that information contained within this post may annoy the reader although that is certainly not the intent of the author. Reading past this point constitutes an agreement by the reader to waive his legal right not to be annoyed by anonymous communication on the internet.

If you do not wish to waive this right, please stop reading at this point and use the ignore feature on this forum to avoid future posts by this author. Thank you.

You could pull one and see, but I would bet that they have an exposed lead base.

lance22
January 8, 2006, 10:52 PM
A couple years ago my brother tested out at 42 lead, I tested out at 24. We attributed it to running IPSC matches at an indoor range where we pick stuff up off the floor, tape things to the floor, take tape off of floor ... lotsa lead laying aorund indoor ranges, especially when those ranges aren't washing the place down as often (or at all) as they are supposed to.

Now, when I go to indoor matches, I don't clean up or help out, or RO. I shoot for fun, not to ruin my health.

hso
January 8, 2006, 11:03 PM
hso:

Thanks for the reply.

I do not reload. I shoot in our backyard. I only shoot milsurp NATO 7.62 X 51 from a FAL. The bullets are copper clad. (Not sure about the bullet base.)

Yup, me too. The milsurp bullets will have an open base.

Got any kids? If so, and your very concerned, wipe your hands well with a wet wipe before going in and wipe your FAL down also before putting her away. Be sure to change clothes and wash up after shooting and to wash up after cleaning that FAL. (What type? Izzy, Argie, Imbel, SA, Frankenfal?)

jmorris
January 5, 2007, 04:41 PM
Just thought I would post an update. After 10 months of no indoor ranges my lead level has droped from 20mg/dl to 12mg/dl. I still shoot almost every weekend sat & sun IDPA/USPSA. Just no longer indoors.

esheato
January 5, 2007, 07:38 PM
Great news!

Ed

GreenFurniture
January 5, 2007, 08:04 PM
Just thought I would post an update. After 10 months of no indoor ranges my lead level has droped from 20mg/dl to 12mg/dl. I still shoot almost every weekend sat & sun IDPA/USPSA. Just no longer indoors.

That's great!

Does your local indoor range check their air quality and change their filters regularly?

Soybomb
January 5, 2007, 09:00 PM
I'd be interested in having the blood work done myself some time. The most accessible range for me is sadly an indoor range some distance away and I'm not sure their lead cautions are that great. I always wind up tasting it, they have carpet runners and brooms at the lanes for brass sweeping, etc.

I am trying to be extra cautious myself and wearing gloves when cleaning, etc.

Parvenu
January 5, 2007, 09:17 PM
do you mean that from firing a gun you can get lead poisoning? or is it just sweeping up the bits of bullets?

91Bravo
January 5, 2007, 10:03 PM
I shoot indoor smallbore over the winter; the only time the fan gets turned on where I shoot is when the older members can taste smoke or can't see their targets. When we're done, a couple of them dry sweep the brass into a dustpan, then dump it into a mesh screen box and shaken over the trash can to seperate the brass from the debris on the floor. I try not to be in the room while the sweeping and shaking are going on. "We've always done it this way". This is in a Guard armory range with posted instructions including mandatory use of the fan system at all times when shooting. The main reason for not using the air system? It's loud and interferes with being able to chat.

Spot77
January 5, 2007, 10:25 PM
do you mean that from firing a gun you can get lead poisoning?


Some people say you can get it from being on the wrong end of a gun too. :neener:

jmorris: Glad you're healthier!

JohnKSa
January 5, 2007, 11:24 PM
do you mean that from firing a gun you can get lead poisoning?YES.

Both the vaporized lead from the bullet/bullet base and lead compounds in the primers can be inhaled and result in lead poisoning.

You can also ingest the lead residue left on your hands if you're not careful to wash up before eating/touching your face/smoking/etc.

BullfrogKen
January 6, 2007, 12:22 AM
pax said: What I have always understood is that if you can taste the lead in the air, you are getting a pretty large dose of it.

I always wondered why my boogers tasted so good after a trip to the indoor range . . .

torpid
January 6, 2007, 12:34 AM
I always wondered why my boogers tasted so good after a trip to the indoor range . . .

Yeah, they do!
Thanks for not hoarding them.

:D

JohnKSa
January 6, 2007, 12:40 AM
I have no response for that... :D

Walkalong
January 6, 2007, 08:56 AM
Too much information dude. :neener:

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