Post Falls 2nd grader suspended for gun fib.


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Pilgrim
January 6, 2006, 03:12 PM
2nd-grader suspended for saying he had gun
By BRIAN WALKER
Staff writer

PF superintendent says those types of comments 'will not be tolerated'

POST FALLS - A Prairie View Elementary second-grader was suspended from school indefinitely for saying he had a gun.

"It is my understanding the student told other students that he had a gun, but he didn't have a gun of any kind," said Post Falls school superintendent Jerry Keane. "We didn't feel there was an immediate threat, but we're certainly taking this seriously and the comment was out of line and will not be tolerated."

Keane said no letters were sent home with parents because there didn't appear to be an immediate threat and no gun of any kind was brought to campus.

"There was absolutely no truth to what was said," Keane said.

When contacted by The Press late Thursday afternoon, Post Falls Police Lt. Greg McLean said he had not heard about the suspension.

Keane said the student will likely be suspended for a minimum of one to two more days. An expulsion is unlikely due to the student's young age, he said.

"We'll work with the parents and the student on this," Keane said. "We'll certainly give the student the advice and support he needs to avoid such a problem in the future. We'll definitely have some remediation in what's not appropriate to say."

Area school districts have zero-tolerance when it comes to remarks or threats about guns.

"There's no way we can ignore any comment of this kind," Keane said.

Keane said this is the first suspension of its kind in the district this year. Keane plans to meet with Prairie View principal Colleen Kelsey to further discuss the appropriate course of action.

http://www.cdapress.com/articles/2006/01/06/news/news02.txt

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Car Knocker
January 6, 2006, 03:23 PM
Ambiguous story. Did the kid say he had a gun at the school or did he tell classmates that he had a gun at home? My daughter had a single-shot .22 at that age, locked up and to be used with supervision only. Would she now be suspended in Post Falls if she told her friends about the gun she got for Christmas? Have we fallen that far?

Pilgrim
January 6, 2006, 03:30 PM
Hard to say.

There have been some interesting moments in my grandkid's classrooms when they brag, "I shot a gun yesterday," and "My grandpa carries a gun." Then there was the day the oldest granddaugher (17 years) took her silhouette pistol target to school for "show and tell".

Fortunately, the area is noted for having a lot of hunters and thus the teachers were somewhat accustomed to this kind of student bragging.

Pilgrim

SSN Vet
January 6, 2006, 03:46 PM
Maybe if we just "punished" little Johny's behind...he could

1. repent
2. get wise
3. continue his education

and the school could save the $$ they'll spend on

1. the law suit
2. the in home tutor they'll have to provide

(depending on the state....the requirement to provide a free public education doesn't end with expulsion....believe me I know....my wife was the tutor for a 10th grader expelled for dealing pot at our local high school...what a waste of money that was.)

But our Vermont judge wouldn't agree!!

Camp David
January 6, 2006, 03:51 PM
2nd-grader suspended for saying he had gun


Would the youngster have received a life prison sentence if he said he had an atomic bomb?

Cases like this remind me of why only the ignorant enter the education profession!!!

HighVelocity
January 6, 2006, 04:08 PM
If the same second grader said he had a gun or bomb on an airplane the result could have been a lot worse than being sent home.
Maybe the school over reacted, maybe not.

petrel800
January 6, 2006, 05:14 PM
Area school districts have zero-tolerance when it comes to remarks or threats about guns.


Let me translate for you . . .

Area school districts have a ZERO-THOUGHT policy when it comes to remarks or threats about guns.

This way instead doing what is appropriate, and using their brains to think of a solution. They can now open up a procedure book and read what the proper punishment is for this offense. Much like a computer works, you imput information, and an answer comes out. In fact, why don't we just have computers do this work instead of paying people not to think?

Old Fuff
January 6, 2006, 08:12 PM
I presume that this kid is 7 or 8 years old...

The School Superintendent is a little bit behind him...:uhoh:

Standing Wolf
January 6, 2006, 10:30 PM
We'll certainly give the student the advice and support he needs to avoid such a problem in the future. We'll definitely have some remediation in what's not appropriate to say.

Smack his little back side for lying and let it go at that! I can't believe people in so-called "education" can't see the obvious solution to an age-old problem: kids tell lies from time to time.

afasano
January 6, 2006, 10:39 PM
Just make trouble when kids talk about guns and they will never buy guns, the womens groups are behind this.

Kim
January 7, 2006, 03:14 AM
I do worry about boys in school. I have been thinking about it lately. Most women are not lefty females and I wonder if they worry about their boys. I just read an article where 67% of college graduates are now female. And I notice as a physician all the male children being placed on Ritalin like drugs. Very few girls. All this makes me worry that something is wrong and it looks like our boys and future men may have problems that need to be fixed now.

Old Fuff
January 7, 2006, 10:52 AM
Kim:

I think you've hit the nail on the head. Women in this country as a whole are not radical-left, but much of the education establishment (including schools that train teachers) is.

Boys are... well boys. But the educators want them to grow up to be non-agressive and complient to authority. They of course presume that they will be living in a more socialist environment, and the authorities will match their views. In many schools today a youngster can't even say the word "gun," lest they be overheard and be in trouble. A boy in first or second grade that draws a picture of a gun can be suspended or even expelled. I can easily see what's behind this and where it's going...

edited to correct typo.

model 649
January 7, 2006, 12:55 PM
"This child has commited Thoughtcrime and will be re-educated".
Josh

Lindenberger
January 8, 2006, 01:35 AM
I do worry about boys in school. I have been thinking about it lately. Most women are not lefty females and I wonder if they worry about their boys. I just read an article where 67% of college graduates are now female. And I notice as a physician all the male children being placed on Ritalin like drugs. Very few girls. All this makes me worry that something is wrong and it looks like our boys and future men may have problems that need to be fixed now.

The Goths did not destroy Rome. What destroyed Rome was Political Correctness. The Goths merely took advantage of that. The effeminization of the populace was part of it. Sound familiar?

jtward01
January 8, 2006, 05:07 AM
It's amazing how paranoid some people are about guns. I was hospitalized for four months early last year so several times my wife brought me the gun mags and catalogs that had come in the mail. One night I was reading American Handgunner and a nurse came in and she freaked! First she told me I couldn't have "those kinds" of magazines in the hospital. Then she offered to get me some other magazines from the gift shop if I would let her throw the gun magazines away. Finally, she called security and tried to get them to confiscate the magazines. Of course, the security officer had a lot more sense than she did and told her I wasn't breaking any rules. After she left the officer and I had a nice chat about guns and he ended up borrowing a couple of the mags to read on his lunch break.

ZenMasterJG
January 8, 2006, 05:24 AM
untolerence is doubleplusgood.

Long Live B.B.

Uh oh, i think me and josh are getting room 101 for sure! :evil:

AK-74me
January 8, 2006, 08:17 AM
It's amazing how paranoid some people are about guns. I was hospitalized for four months early last year so several times my wife brought me the gun mags and catalogs that had come in the mail. One night I was reading American Handgunner and a nurse came in and she freaked! First she told me I couldn't have "those kinds" of magazines in the hospital. Then she offered to get me some other magazines from the gift shop if I would let her throw the gun magazines away. Finally, she called security and tried to get them to confiscate the magazines. Of course, the security officer had a lot more sense than she did and told her I wasn't breaking any rules. After she left the officer and I had a nice chat about guns and he ended up borrowing a couple of the mags to read on his lunch break.

LOL, that is too funny "those kind of magazines" as if you were looking at porn in a childrens hospital or something.

1911 guy
January 8, 2006, 08:39 AM
We are in the throes of the mental neutering of the next generation. It was once prized to be an original thinker, now no longer tolerated. It was once alright to be better or worse than someone else at a given thing, now the illusion of "equality" has derailed reality. Women claim they want "sensitive" men, then rightly are dissapointed when they also turn out to be spineless men. Men are worried about someone perceiving them as neanderthal and suppress the natural drive to be leaders in the home, then wonder why everything is going to Hell in a handbasket. I recommend a book by Stu Webber titled "Tender Warrior".

As for this story in particular, Little Johnny needs to have his butt paddled for lying (if the comment wasn't about having a gun at home) and a serious chat with his old man about how threatening folks isn't acceptable (if applicaable to his comments). Bottom line, if he said what the article implies, gun at school, I don't feel it's over reaction to toss a kid out for a few days. If, however, it was a conversation taken out of context, serious over reaction.

slide
January 8, 2006, 10:38 AM
Due to the ambiguity of the article, we don't have a sense of context so can't judge what the effect was of the kid's comments. For example, had he said he had a gun, made a move as if to pull it from concealment, and as a result, several other kids fled across a busy street, that's a problem. OTOH, he may have said simply that he had a gun at home for target shooting under his dad's supervision.

Also this may have been the culmination of many incidents with this kid. The assumption that this is a normal easy going kid who made an offhand comment and then got tossed from school may be correct, but it probably isn't.

Old Fuff
January 8, 2006, 11:09 AM
Also this may have been the culmination of many incidents with this kid. The assumption that this is a normal easy going kid who made an offhand comment and then got tossed from school may be correct, but it probably isn't.

Given the way things are in today's schools, I have no doubt that the story is true as written. I think if this student had been a "problem child" the Superintendent would have made some reference to it, so as to further justify his action. Further, If the school staff really thought there was a gun they would have probably locked the school down and had the kid taken away by the police post haste. I suspect that what we have here is a 7 or 8 year-old boy who said something shocking to get some adult(?) attention, and then got more then he expected.

Lindenberger
January 8, 2006, 01:01 PM
. . . . I suspect that what we have here is a 7 or 8 year-old boy who said something shocking to get some adult(?) attention, and then got more then he expected.

Sounds as though you might've actually been 7 or 8 once upon a time.

Euclidean
January 8, 2006, 01:22 PM
Cases like this remind me of why only the ignorant enter the education profession!!!

And everyone who doesn't enter the education profession is a drooling moron who collects welfare checks and fries chicken for a living! I know it's true because I've seen one example of it!

(I apologize, I don't mean to offend anyone who fries chicken for a living. That's honest work, and in my case much appreciated.)

I can make blanket statements based on one single incident too, and they're just as baseless.

Also this may have been the culmination of many incidents with this kid. The assumption that this is a normal easy going kid who made an offhand comment and then got tossed from school may be correct, but it probably isn't.

Thank you slide. You get an A for critical thinking.

What's going to get media attention? Making it look like the kid is a victim of an overzealous school administration, or showing that the school isn't going to put up with a repeat discipline problem?

slide
January 8, 2006, 01:25 PM
I have never personally known of an incident and then read about it in the newspaper where the story was accurate. There is a 100% 'got it wrong' from incident to publication.

I see no reason to assume this story is accurate either.

Euclidean
January 8, 2006, 01:33 PM
That, and something I forgot to mention, regardless of the left or right leanings of the reporter, educators are always the bad guys, just like cops. We can't do anything right because the politicians who are so much smarter than us (Who probably don't remember how to factor a quadratic equation or the capital of Alaska) say so.

slide
January 8, 2006, 01:39 PM
I think it was Heinlein who said that for every problem, there is a solution that's obvious, easy and wrong. Education is a 'problem' where everybody has a solution that meets that description. If you get serious, look at the entire problem, the politics involved, then you'll see that there aren't any one size fits all solutions. That doesn't stop all from having those 'one size' solutions. Worse, they make hard stands on them too.

Here its a tough analysis. Was the emphasis of the story:

1. Educators are stupid.
2. Educators are fed up with 'gun violence' so you better educate your kids to only utter Feinstein approved mutterings
3. A kid is a hapless victim of the inflexible system put upon schools

....and so forth.

Mauserguy
January 8, 2006, 01:58 PM
I don't think that the boy should be expelled, or even spanked. It sounds to me that he was being a talkative little boy with an immagination. Really, I think I would have made him make up a story about how somebody acted responsibly with the gun. Maybe he could write a two page outdoor survival story or something. He may have actually learned something. They should try to direct his curiosity in a positive direction. Instead, they want to suppress him and treat him like a little zombie.

As for the school administrators, I think that they should be suspended for poor teaching ability and bad judgement.
Mauserguy

Live Free Or Die
January 8, 2006, 02:03 PM
The article doesn't contain enough information for me to make a judgment on the appropriateness of the punishment. But it also doesn't do anything to make me rethink my plans to homeschool my kids.

robmkivseries70
January 8, 2006, 02:24 PM
The Safe Schools Act allows suspensions for all sorts of things. In our district a 9 year old was suspended for 10 days for throwing a rock. The student didn't hit anybody and probably didn't intend to hit anybody. The enforcement, of course, depends upon your name and social status. As was implied 30 some years ago, in the western about Judge Roy Bean, we have too much law and not enough justice.
Rob

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