N.Y. Times Editor-Reporter Dies After Attack in NW D.C.


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Pilgrim
January 9, 2006, 03:47 PM
I guess the Washington gun ban is working. He was beaten to death.

Pilgrim

N.Y. Times Editor-Reporter Dies After Attack in NW
Police Searching for Clues in Robbery

By Martin Weil and Allan Lengel
Washington Post Staff Writers
Monday, January 9, 2006; B01

David E. Rosenbaum, a longtime editor and reporter in the Washington bureau of the New York Times, died yesterday after being beaten and robbed Friday night near his home in upper Northwest Washington.

Rosenbaum, 63, died at 7:10 p.m. at Howard University Hospital, where he was treated for a head injury suffered during the attack on Gramercy Street NW, said Philip Taubman, chief of the Times's Washington bureau.

Doctors had operated on Rosenbaum on Saturday to relieve pressure on his brain.

D.C. police were canvassing the neighborhood yesterday for clues in the attack, which occurred in a quiet section between Connecticut and Wisconsin avenues. No arrests had been made.

"David was one of the most accomplished journalists of his generation in Washington," Taubman said last night.

"He could do anything, and he did so many things brilliantly," Taubman said. "He was an all-time great, versatile reporter who could tackle any subject" and wrote about the most abstruse matters, particularly in financial areas, with "remarkable lucidity, speed" and sophistication.

Rosenbaum joined the Washington bureau in 1968 and, with the exception of three years as an editor in New York, had spent his entire Times career there. He retired late last month but was to continue contributing to the Times.

After leaving his house Friday night for a walk to get some fresh air, Rosenbaum was found by a neighbor about 9:30 p.m. in the 3800 block of Gramercy, a one-block street in an upscale neighborhood about a half-mile south of the Montgomery County border.

Little was known about the circumstances of the assault and robbery.

Police said earlier that two men had been seen getting into an automobile and leaving the area about the time of the attack.

Police said Rosenbaum's wallet was taken, and his brother, Marcus, said the family received a call Saturday indicating that an effort had been made to use a credit card belonging to Rosenbaum.

Rosenbaum's survivors include his wife, two children and two grandchildren.

The area where the attack occurred is one of the safest in the city. Street robberies have been reported there occasionally, but homicides and other violent incidents are all but unknown.

Police said last night that they were treating Rosenbaum's death as a homicide, pending an autopsy.

"It's a remarkably safe neighborhood, or it feels that way . . . until now," said Peter Bass, who lives on Gramercy.

On his street and on adjacent streets of single-family homes, "everybody's comings and goings are noticed," Bass said.

In recent years, he said, many of the houses on the tree-lined streets have been sold by longtime residents to younger couples with growing families.

"We have very small children. We'll have our guard up even more, use our alarms more religiously," Bass said.

Karen and Mitchell Strickler, who moved last year after living on Gramercy for more than 30 years, expressed surprise at the news.

It was a neighborhood, Mitchell Strickler said, where people often did not feel the need to lock their houses. "There was no fear of things," he said.

Rosenbaum was known as a mentor to younger reporters and taught and lectured at Dartmouth College, his alma mater, as well as Stanford University and other colleges and universities.

He was a native of Miami and grew up in Tampa. He worked for the St. Petersburg Times in Florida and Congressional Quarterly in Washington before joining the New York Times.

Among the stories he covered were the Senate Watergate hearings, the Iran-contra affair and budget and tax debates between the White House and Congress.

Rosenbaum's work also was focused on national politics; he directed Times coverage of the New Hampshire primaries in the last three presidential election years and continued to be active in covering the 2004 general election campaign.

In the past year, he had covered Social Security restructuring proposals.
2006 The Washington Post Company

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LSCurrier
January 9, 2006, 04:33 PM
I thought DC was one of the safest cities around - given that they have laws banning guns and all?

Guess I was wrong.

Luke

Igloodude
January 9, 2006, 04:56 PM
Condolences to his family.

I don't suppose Mrs. Rosenbaum is intending to become the pro-gun version of Sarah Brady now?

El Tejon
January 9, 2006, 05:09 PM
What is really sad is that to the Left this incident represents progress in civilization as he was beaten to death, not shot.:(

As a former inmate of D.C., I would not leave my house unarmed after dark no matter I lived there.:uhoh:

Henry Bowman
January 9, 2006, 05:17 PM
I guess the Washington gun ban is working. He was beaten to death.Which is morally superior (in their minds) to him having protected his life with the "devil's tool."

fourays2
January 9, 2006, 05:54 PM
I guess the Washington gun ban is working. He was beaten to death.

Pilgrim

N.Y. Times Editor-Reporter Dies After Attack in NW
Police Searching for Clues in Robbery

By Martin Weil and Allan Lengel
Washington Post Staff Writers
Monday, January 9, 2006; B01

David E. Rosenbaum, a longtime editor and reporter in the Washington bureau of the New York Times, died yesterday after being beaten and robbed Friday night near his home in upper Northwest Washington.

Rosenbaum, 63, died at 7:10 p.m. at Howard University Hospital, where he was treated for a head injury suffered during the attack on Gramercy Street NW, said Philip Taubman, chief of the Times's Washington bureau.

Doctors had operated on Rosenbaum on Saturday to relieve pressure on his brain.

D.C. police were canvassing the neighborhood yesterday for clues in the attack, which occurred in a quiet section between Connecticut and Wisconsin avenues. No arrests had been made.

"David was one of the most accomplished journalists of his generation in Washington," Taubman said last night.

"He could do anything, and he did so many things brilliantly," Taubman said. "He was an all-time great, versatile reporter who could tackle any subject" and wrote about the most abstruse matters, particularly in financial areas, with "remarkable lucidity, speed" and sophistication.

Rosenbaum joined the Washington bureau in 1968 and, with the exception of three years as an editor in New York, had spent his entire Times career there. He retired late last month but was to continue contributing to the Times.

After leaving his house Friday night for a walk to get some fresh air, Rosenbaum was found by a neighbor about 9:30 p.m. in the 3800 block of Gramercy, a one-block street in an upscale neighborhood about a half-mile south of the Montgomery County border.

Little was known about the circumstances of the assault and robbery.



this seams a little odd, what is the temperature like at night in the middle of winter in DC?

NineseveN
January 9, 2006, 06:05 PM
Condolences to his family.

I don't suppose Mrs. Rosenbaum is intending to become the pro-gun version of Sarah Brady now?

That would be wonderful, but not gonna happen.

TonkinTwentyMil
January 9, 2006, 06:05 PM
This sad case illustrates, once again, the Detached-From-Reality mindset of the lefty pacifist-elites.

Let's say you're a Street Punk desperately looking for a "score." An easy score. Where do you go looking?

1. In Washington, D.C. -- where your target-victims have all been disarmed.

2. In northwest Washington -- heavily populated by upscale professionals who have more stuff (and money) than those ghetto folks.

3. In a neighborhood where historic voting records are 90%+ Democrat, where nearly all the cars sport bumper stickers in the vein of "Kerry For Prez" and "Ban Handguns."

4. In a neighborhood where any street-wise "Gladiator-Academy" (prison) alumnus has a rich field of prime targets to pick from -- targets like N.Y.TIMES reporters, lawyers, and senior gov't bureaucrats. All targets who've bought into the locally-prevalent cultural conditioning that dictates one must NEVER fight back at the point of attack. Because THAT kind of, umm, conflict, is "Neanderthal behavior." THAT is "lowering yourself to Their Level." And because "violence never solves anything."

I suppose police "suits" and city-pols will try to convince us that senseless crimes like this are purely "random." I'll dispute that, simply because experienced criminals tend to develop a unique kind of "victim selection radar" that the lib-elites cannot fathom.

I've spent a lot of time in neighborhoods like this one -- including time IN this particular one. I know these target-in-waiting people well. They despise people ("Vast Right Wing Vigilantes") like me because we rub their noses in the harsh realities they cannot contemplate facing. That's why they loathe guns and anything/anyone "military."

That's why they're slowly headed for extinction.

tellner
January 9, 2006, 06:11 PM
Pity. He was an excellent investigative journalist even if I didn't agree with a lot of his opinions. It's an even greater pity that he wasn't armed and wouldn't have wanted to be. There would be one more top-flight reporter and maybe one less goblin.

mtnbkr
January 9, 2006, 06:26 PM
this seams a little odd, what is the temperature like at night in the middle of winter in DC?
Lately, it's been unseasonably warm.

Chris

TonkinTwentyMil
January 9, 2006, 10:25 PM
I haven't heard our various good THR Liberal brethren chime in here... at least to challenge my (above ) points.

Hello, out there. Calling all Pacifist Elites!

Earth to Libdom: come on down...

Standing Wolf
January 9, 2006, 10:48 PM
They despise people ("Vast Right Wing Vigilantes") like me because we rub their noses in the harsh realities they cannot contemplate facing. That's why they loathe guns and anything/anyone "military."
That's why they're slowly headed for extinction.

If they wanted to do away with themselves, I'd have to figure that's their prerogative; unfortunately, they want to practice on us.

TonkinTwentyMil
January 10, 2006, 03:20 AM
There's a Washington Post follow-up story on this case that's linked on the current Drudge Report.

New findings:

1. The victim was out for a night walk LISTENING TO MUSIC ON HEAD-PHONES!

2. It took 22 MINUTES for an ambulance to arrive (after a neighbor discovered the victim)!

3. The on-scene cops and EMT's -- and the hospital E.R. personnel -- all thought he had some medical condition, or a stroke. This mis-diagnosis delayed correct head injury treatment by SEVERAL HOURS!

Lessons learned:

1. SITUATIONAL AWARENESS is the key to survival. Listening to head-phone music when out for an urban night-stroll EVEN IN "NICE" PARTS OF THE JUNGLE is (regrettably) classic blissninny/victim-in-waiting behavior.

2. Dial 911 and depend on the cops/EMTs for salvation? (Right.) A gun in the hand beats a cop on the phone.

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