The RCBS 505 Scale is not worth the volume of air it takes up.


PDA






Tomekeuro85
January 10, 2006, 01:24 AM
I am so mad right now. I have been spending about 5 mins to measure each individual charge of Varget for my .223 loads for the last 4 hours. I only have about 30 rounds charged and thats where I'm stopping because I do not have time for this nonsense scale. I know why it is called the 505. Because you can measure the charge 5 times, and you'll get an accurate reading 0 times, so you'll have to measure 5 more times. I'm about to send this scale on a high speed adventure towards my wall because watching it explode will be of more value to me than using this piece of trash to measure powder charges. For example: I can put up 26 grains, and then when i take off that golden little pan and put it back on to the scale, I get something like 26.2. If i take it back off and put it on again i get 25.9. I add some powder and it says 25.9 again. I add some more and it jumps to 26.3. This process repeats itself for about 5 mins until I get a consistent reading of 26 at least 3 times in a row, just to be safe. I have tried every combination of techniques to try to get this to work, but with no success. On top of that, the uniflo measure practially doesn't work with varget. (but that is to be expected because the manual said that cylindrical powders won't be as consistent). Anyhow, that concludes my anger. If anyone wants to trade an electronic dispenser and scale combo for an RCBS 505, just let me know. haha.

If you enjoyed reading about "The RCBS 505 Scale is not worth the volume of air it takes up." here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
SemiAutoMan
January 10, 2006, 01:55 AM
sounds like something to target practice at next time you shoot ;)

Mal H
January 10, 2006, 01:59 AM
That model of scale should be better than you described. Has it fallen recently? Sounds like one or both bearings may be damaged. Or they could have some grit or dust on them. Remove the arm and clean the bearing area and the knife blades. If that doesn't help, check that it is on a sturdy table and that there is no air currents of any type hitting it.

Another possibility, though more remote than the above problems, is static electricity. How is the humidity in the room where you are reloading?

Tomekeuro85
January 10, 2006, 02:03 AM
That model of scale should be better than you described. Has it fallen recently? Sounds like one or both bearings may be damaged. Or they could have some grit or dust on them. Remove the arm and clean the bearing area and the knife blades. If that doesn't help, check that it is on a sturdy table and that there is no air currents of any type hitting it.

Another possibility, though more remote than the above problems, is static electricity. How is the humidity in the room where you are reloading?

It has not fallen any time recently. I just got this scale, along with the whole Rockchucker kit about 2 weeks ago. This is the second time using this scale. I had no problems the first time I used it. I made sure all the moving parts were clean several times. There is no air current, and the table is sturdy. I am thinking if anything, there might be static like you mentioned. I am in a different area than I was when it worked good the first time, and now I have all these problems. I'm not going to give up though, a little thing like this is not enough to stop me.

Tomekeuro85
January 10, 2006, 02:17 AM
Under further examination, I noticed that when weight is added to the pan, the left side of the long arm moves up. However, last time I used this scale, the arm would move up smoothly, and smoothly change direction and move downward. It would continue this until it was balanced. Now what it does is this: on its way up, the left side of the arm stops abruptly, as if it is hitting something, but there is nothing there, nor is there anything under the pan or anywhere near the scale. I checked again for dirt on all the moving parts, but I dont see any, unless there is something there that I do not see.

Lambo
January 10, 2006, 02:20 AM
Is this the Scale that's part of the RCBS RC Supreme Reloading Kit?

Tomekeuro85
January 10, 2006, 02:33 AM
Yes, this one came with the kit.

dakotasin
January 10, 2006, 02:33 AM
first, email rcbs. they will want the scale sent to them. do it.
next... don't be so anal about your loads. i am an accuracy freak, but i've spent the last couple years trying to figure out if powder charge is that important... it is, but not as important as you are making it.

varget isn't the best metering powder, but it meters well enough for the rcbs uniflow. set it, get into your loading rhythm, and then weigh your first few throws to make sure you are staying in rhythm (the more times you tap the thrower, the more powder you'll get - just get into a rhythm). then, start charging away.

yeah, i had a real hard time getting away from 'weigh and trickle every charge', but i proved it to myself, and no longer drive myself nutty on the bench. i didn't do this w/ just one or two guns, i did it w/ a lot of guns...

rutten
January 10, 2006, 02:47 AM
Email or call RCBS. I have used their customer service a couple of times and they are fabulous to work with. If they want you to send the scale in request that you be refunded for shipping charges. I do not think that will be a problem. I have measures thousands of loads with a 505 and have been very happy with its accuracy. I recently purchased a digital scale but will still on ocassion test it against the 505 and they are both spot on.
Scott

Tomekeuro85
January 10, 2006, 02:54 AM
Thanks everyone for the help. I'll be sure to email them and I'll see what they say.

BruceB
January 10, 2006, 05:53 AM
I logged a lot of time with the 5-0-5 scale before moving up to the 10-10 model. The only reason I changed was to get the ability to weigh heavier objects. I keep the 5-0-5 handy as a backup in case of unforeseen difficulties.

Your description of the arm's movement sounds VERY much as if there's something foreign in the vee(s) of the agate bearings, where the beam actually rests on its sharp-edged pivots. I'd get a magnifying glass and take a HARD look into those bearings under a strong light, and if nothing's in there that shouldn't be, then I'd take an equally hard look at the bearing surfaces on those pivot arms on the beam. Maybe even a careful bit of LIGHT stoning on the pivot surfaces of the arms to remove any possible tiny burrs would be in order.

Make sure that the bearings and arms are left absolutely clean and dry, to avoid attracting grit and crud. There certainly should be no hitches whatever in the movement of the beam.

My 5-0-5 is sensitive enough to register the weight of my name, written in pencil, on a piece of paper. Weighing the little bit of paper first, I'd then write my name on it and the scale would tell me how much pencil graphite (or whatever that stuff is) I'd just scrawled onto the paper.

You have a good scale, and it will serve you well once the problem is cured. They've sold many thousands of them over the years, after all. Definitely, give RCBS a call. They might even send you a new one!

redneck2
January 10, 2006, 07:03 AM
Sounds like something's hanging up. Should be smooth

That said, I basically ran into the same thing with my balance beam. I got a PACT. Rapidly blinks 2-3 times and gives the same reading every time.

HSMITH
January 10, 2006, 09:39 AM
Sounds like there is some crud in the pivot for the beam......

huntingnt
January 10, 2006, 10:00 AM
I have never had any problems with my 505 scale, but will tell you that I had a small problem with a set of .38 spl dies, called RCBS, and they sent new seating plugs for RN and SWC and extra decapping pins just for the heck of it.
They are a great company to deal with. The best customer service I have experienced in a long time.

Steve in PA
January 10, 2006, 11:26 AM
I'd clean all the pivoting points. I've been using that same scale (came with the kit) for over 15 years and have had zero problems with it.

The Bushmaster
January 11, 2006, 09:47 PM
I loaded using a RCBS 5-0-5 for the first 5 years of my loading hobby. It served me well. I now have a RCBS (Pact) electronic scale... I have never done anything with my 5-0-5 except to blow it off with compressed air from one of those cans used to clean computer key boards...You will not get mine as I still use it to varify my Electronic scale. It is a great backup...:)

klw
January 11, 2006, 11:00 PM
Spent seven years in college studying chemistry. This may be the only time in life I'll actually use that education from so long ago.

The little weights on this kind of balance are called riders. I don't remember the exact layout on this particular balance but normally the riders are divided into two sides. One side has the really large weight increments and one side has the really small ones. What actually happens is that the large weights actually add weights as they are moved out along the balance beam and the small weight subtracts. Believe me or not that is the way it works.

BUT this layout has one oddity. Since one side adds and one side subtracts they have to be almost perfectly made to work properly. So 25.9 + 0.1 may or may not be 26.0 depending on the exact nature of your balances riders. REALLY small differences here make a large difference in the weight. This has always been true.

When I first tripped over this maybe 20 years ago it took me quite a while to figure it out. Having not thought about it in 20 years probably makes this explaination hard to follow. Sorry about that.

But the point is one rider or set of riders add weight and one rider, the smallest, on the other part of the balance, subtracts weight. Right at the point where you go from say 25.9 grains to 25.9 + 0.1 grains these kind of balances can get, well, fuzzy. It has always been true. They are much better if you aren't at a place where this one oddity is occuring. So 25.4 + 0.1 is going to be 24.5 but 24.9 + 0.1 might well be 25.2.

I'm sure I have not explained this well but go experiment with you balance.

bogie
January 11, 2006, 11:27 PM
Before you do this, try some brake cleaner on the scale where the pieces meet, then wipe everything down with a lintless rag.

The RCBS Uniflow is also a good measure - give it time.

1) Run about 10 hoppers of powder through your measure. Operate the handle the same way every time. Yeah. It'll be boring.

2) Now, measure a charge. And the next charge. And 8 more... Then add 'em together and divide by 10 to get an average. Are you plus/minus 0.1 grain? That's as close as _any_ mass-market reloading scale is going to get you.

Er... Turn off the furnace while you're doing this - the air currents will shift things.

Now's for the fun part.

3) Try a few charges with the measure, and be very gentle with it. See how they spread...

4) Now whomp on the thing... Hard up, whack it again, hard down, then whack it again. But try to be uniform. How does that work?

Figure out what gives you your closest, most consistent, spread, and use that technique.

FWIW, I shoot benchrest competition, and I rarely use a scale.

Stinger
January 11, 2006, 11:29 PM
One side has the really large weight increments and one side has the really small ones. What actually happens is that the large weights actually add weights as they are moved out along the balance beam and the small weight subtracts. Believe me or not that is the way it works.

Well, I sure hope that is not the way it works, because if it is, I have been using mine wrong for years :what:

Regards,

Stinger

R.W.Dale
January 11, 2006, 11:41 PM
Well, I sure hope that is not the way it works, because if it is, I have been using mine wrong for years :what:

Regards,

Stinger


You must be cause that's how my scale works.:)

The Bushmaster
January 11, 2006, 11:46 PM
I agree stinger...The large weight if moved to the right will lesson the weight. The other "two" on the other side of the folcrum also lesson the weight as they are moved to the right...:)

Stinger
January 12, 2006, 12:09 AM
Right.

A move to the left increases weight on any poise. A move to the right decreases weight on any poise.

Geez, you guys had me scared for a second. I checked the RCBS website, and there are instuctions for the scale.

Here is the link...http://www.rcbs.com/downloads/instructions/Model505ScaleInstructions.pdf


The way klw described it, you needed a degree in astro-physics, and at least a Masters in Mathematics.

Regards,

Stinger

LHB1
January 12, 2006, 12:12 AM
I have an old model Lyman-Ohaus M5 manual scale which is very similar to the current RCBS 1010 model. The pan is on the right, a large slider is on the left side of fulcrum, and a small slider is on the right side of fulcrum near the pan. You move the large slider to the left for heavier weights in increments of 5 grains IIRC. You move the small slide also to the left for heavier weights in increments of .1 grain up to a max of 5 grains. Remember the small slider is on the opposite side of fulcrum from large slider. Thus when you move the small slider to the left (DECREASING the actual weight on that side) it is the same as ADDING that weight to the opposite side of fulcrum where the large slider is. This may be what KLW was trying to say above if I understood his post correctly. So you ADD the weight indicated by large slider AND the weight indicated by the small slider to obtain the total weight of object being weighed. You do NOT subtract the small slider weight from the large slider weight, at least on this model scale.

Good shooting and be safe.
LB

The Bushmaster
January 12, 2006, 12:18 AM
A technicality...Not all of us are engineering grads and we veiw everything in a simpler manor. We depend on the "KISS" theory...:D

klw
January 12, 2006, 12:23 AM
I knew that I should have kept my mouth shut!

I also knew that I explained it badly. When I first realized how these things worked I didn't quite believe it. Of course 20 years of not thinking about it didn't help.

Think that I just added to the confusion.

Grump
January 12, 2006, 01:37 AM
Yeah. It makes a difference of no more than .3 of a grain on my old Redding whatever scales (have two), but about 1 out of 5 weighings will shift a bit if I tap the base with my fingernail when it's settled to less than +/- .1 grain in the swing...or it's just stopped.

I also advocate the weigh 5 or 10 and divide to get the average approach. Many of my load stickers go to two decimal places..well, I used to.

When the weather warms up and I actually have time to set up a chrono/accuracy/sandbags lineup on 100- or 200-yard targets, I just may chrono those 4064 loads that I threw with an old Lyman Ideal measure, then marked each case...41.6, 41.4, even the 41.1s I'm going to see whether the weight variations on volumetrically-equal charges is more important for velocity than barrel heating. I might have a set of 10-15 that were tricked to be within .1 or .2 grains on extreme spread, too. That would establish the "noise" of random variation as far as the pure mass of the powder charge.

Other variables might affect velocity more. But the bullets are also +/- .1 or .2 grain right out of the box and the brass is once-fired and all primers are from the same lot...

But if 200-yard accuracy is the same with the most extreme-spread batch of ammo, I'm going to quit even thinking about worrying about it. Already had a large batch of Dillon 550 ammo using 748 that shot a smitdge less than 1 MOA at 200 yards, with iron sights.

If I ever get around to it, I'll report...

The Bushmaster
January 12, 2006, 01:38 AM
Aah klw...Join the club...We all have our moments...:D

shu
January 14, 2006, 09:28 AM
nice thread. thanks, guys. next visit to the reloading room with some free time i b'lieve i'll get out the 505 scale and the powder trickler and study the scale as powder is added and then balanced - particularly passing the 1 and 10 gr intervals.

i keep the 505 scale out on the bench (rather than move it in and out of storage) and covered with a folded piece of legal size paper (dust cover) when not in use. also have a set of check-weights.

i find the rcbs uniflow measure to be remarkably consistent. favor a smart WHACK - WHACK when cycling the handle to vibrate the hopper a bit.

having set the scale for the prescribed weight, and adjusted the powder measure to the selected weight, i rarely tinker with the powder measure during the run - believing that chasing observed variations will actually result in widening the distribution. (see w. edwards deming's book "out of the crisis")

ulflyer
January 14, 2006, 09:50 AM
Is there some common object, like coins, that can be used to check the scale?

lee n. field
January 14, 2006, 12:23 PM
Is there some common object, like coins, that can be used to check the scale?

I think (without having checked it, I admit) that coins are going to vary too much on account of different ammounts of wear.

A check weight set is inexpensive, and good peace of mind.

caz223
January 14, 2006, 12:55 PM
If you have a known good scale, you can grab a box of good bullets and weigh them one at a time until you find one that's exactly what you want.

Gila Jorge
June 9, 2007, 09:07 PM
I had a 10-10 scale and used to get similarly frustrated...quit and went digital
and checked the 10-10 with the digital...then got a third digital from RCBS to check the first Dillon digital...the two digitals agreed...but the 10-10 turned out to be subject to error...so I go rid of it...just as you should and get a digital or two to content yourself that you are on the button...I am keen on
precise loads also...so should you be...continue your pursuit...

Walkalong
June 9, 2007, 09:34 PM
WOT?!?!? Nobody taps their mechanical scales?


I tap mine. :)

ranger335v
June 9, 2007, 10:17 PM
One commonly overlooked "friction" point on beam scales are the ends of the pivots rubbing against the brackets securing the agate bearings.

Setting the beam in the center removes the contact and will allow the arm to swing freely.

P-32
June 9, 2007, 11:22 PM
I used to trickle for my match loads. I load a lot of 308 and 223 for High Power. After the beam scale gave me a hard time one night I bought a Lyman DPS 1200. Works great. I still use the Uniflow to get the charge close and finsh it off with the DPS. If I had it to do over I believe I would go with a RCBS Chargemaster.

jhansman
June 9, 2007, 11:35 PM
I just got a used 5-0-5 off eBay (I know, I know), and it doesn't work half as well as the Lee scale I got it to replace. Something is wrong with it, because the beam will not move smoothly when weight is added or subtracted. It almost looks like the large poise is rubbing when set at zero, which will be always since the loads I use are all below 10 gr. I was able to weigh a 158gr. bullet, which weighed out to 160 gr. on this scale, but anything under 10 gr. would not move the beam. I'm almost tempted to buy a new one, just to see if it is different. Frustrated! :cuss:

Matt Dillon
June 10, 2007, 10:05 AM
Have you cleaned the Agate bearings, with a toothpick and compressed air? Have you sharpened the knife points that sit in the agate bearings with a small Arkansas stone? I have an old Ohaus 1010 and I swear by it, not at it! Very accurate, consistent, and pretty speedy too, and I always check it with check weights before starting a reloading session.

eliphalet
June 10, 2007, 10:34 AM
I have been using my Ohaus built 5-0-5 RCBS scale over 25 years now and it just keeps on a ticking with no trouble. Do you keep the scale covered when not in use? You can buy weights to check for accuracy.

Mal H
June 10, 2007, 11:01 AM
- Notice -

Once again we have a resurrected thread. The original post is about 1 1/2 years old. I would imagine the problem is either solved by now or the scale has long since gone to the trash dump.

Ol` Joe
June 10, 2007, 01:22 PM
I`ve a RCBS 10-10, 505 of my fathers, a 5-10 I picked up from a garage sale because the $ was right and a Pact digital. All will vary a tenth "LIGHT" if you trickle a charge and pick the pan up and replace it. The scale should though give the same wgt every time you then pick up and replace the pan! I can trickle say 25.5 grs on my pan lift it and replace it to find 25.6grs If I then lift and replace it I get 25.6 gr every time thereafter until I dump it and trickle another charge. I also always find the original wgt read to be the same for each charge weighed. The variation is very consistant.
I believe the problem is hystasis, the very small wgt increments don`t over come inertia very well and the last little bit of wgt doesn`t register properly.

If your scale changes every time you lift and replace the pan with the same starting charge on it there definately is a problem with the scale and the advice to give RCBS a call is what I`d do. They are very good about customer service and will make it right or replace it.

Kimber1911_06238
June 10, 2007, 01:26 PM
I was a consistency freak when I first started reloading. Soon after i realized that for the most part .1 grain of powder makes almost no difference whatsoever.

ADKWOODSMAN
June 10, 2007, 05:24 PM
Ditto the RCBS Chargemaster. My 4 grown kids gave me one for C-Mas this past year, what a great gadget--memory and all!!

270Win
June 10, 2007, 05:48 PM
I'm about to send this scale on a high speed adventure towards my wall because watching it explode will be of more value to me than using this piece of trash to measure powder charges.

This made me laugh out loud! :)

cheygriz
June 10, 2007, 06:12 PM
The RCBS 505 cale is an excellent, high quality, precision tool. If it's zeroed with check weights, and doesn't work well, send it back to RCBS and they will replace it.

BTW, have you ever considered dumping Varget, and the other 19th century "stick" powders, and using ball powder so that you won't have any reason to weigh individual charges?:confused:

I figured that one out about 40 years ago!:D

PowderApe
June 11, 2007, 04:56 PM
If it worked well last time, and it doesn't work worth a darn now probably means something is sticking... either the knife edge is off the bearing, lint or other crap contaminating (powder granules and lube??) the bearing fulcrum.

I've also miss-assembled them in the past and it also created same type of problems. as silly as it sounds, reassemble it and make sure nothing got bent in storage

It's nonsense to weigh each load! Get a powder measure and use the scale to adjust the cavity and just spot check the throw every 20 or so rounds...

Eventually, you might look into a GOOD digital scale- they are well worth it.

The variation between thrown measures of powder are essentially inconsequential. Just use the same technique every time- if you "slap" the lever on the upstroke stop, do it every time. Any inconsistancies WILL make a difference in thrown loads weights.

PowderApe
June 11, 2007, 05:02 PM
"The variation between thrown measures of powder are essentially inconsequential. Just use the same technique every time- if you "slap" the lever on the upstroke stop, do it every time. Any inconsistancies WILL make a difference in thrown loads weights.

what I mean to say is that the variation between throws in a PROPERLY SET UP and LOCKED IN powder measure is pretty inconsequential.... as long as consistant technique is followed.

Walkalong
June 11, 2007, 05:07 PM
My 505 gets a mind of its own once in a while. I have used it so much I recognize it and start over. Wierd though...:)

30Cal
June 11, 2007, 06:41 PM
BTW, have you ever considered dumping Varget, and the other 19th century "stick" powders, and using ball powder so that you won't have any reason to weigh individual charges?

Bah! Ball powder! :P Most people haven't figured out that weighing individual charges doesn't really add much.

Ty

Hoplite
June 11, 2007, 07:12 PM
use the check set of weights every now and then. the scale is OK but i upgraded after a year.

cheygriz
June 15, 2007, 12:46 PM
Bah! Ball powder! :P Most people haven't figured out that weighing individual charges doesn't really add much.

Ty

:D:D Yeah, I figured that one out a long time ago also. My "mentor" when I first started reloading was a benchrest competitor, and he taught me that it's a waste of time to weigh individual charges REGARDLESS of the powder used.:D:D

According to him, and some of his friends who shot bench also, volumetric consistency is more important to accuracy than weight consistency.

Maybe so, maybe no, but it's always worked for me!:)

Just some guy
December 14, 2007, 09:42 PM
My RCBS 505 scale is a piece of junk!! It does the exact same thing that the original posters scale does. Carefully balance scale, put a charge in, take the pan off and put it back on and it reads a completely different weight. typical error +/- up to .3 grains. Thats a spread of .6 grains and who knows where the actually weight is, on the high side or low.

I got my scale in a the same kit, in late 2006, and have been frustrated with it ever since.

Do you self a favor, dont buy one of these.

I cant even figure out how they could make a balance scale so poorly, as such scales have been being used for what? 2000 years anyway? How do you make a balance scale so it cant even balance RCBS?

Anybody want mine?

rutten
December 14, 2007, 09:57 PM
Just Some Guy, I can find a use for the scale if you do not want it.

Ol` Joe
December 14, 2007, 10:46 PM
My RCBS 505 scale is a piece of junk!! It does the exact same thing that the original posters scale does. Carefully balance scale, put a charge in, take the pan off and put it back on and it reads a completely different weight. typical error +/- up to .3 grains. Thats a spread of .6 grains and who knows where the actually weight is, on the high side or low

If you look back throught the post here you`ll see I`ve addressed this earlier. The problem really isn`t as bad as one thinks. I`d bet if you trickle a charge to a set wgt and lift the pan and replace it the scale will read the same every time. Change the wgt you trickle to and there may be some variation but it will again repete. This is really all that is needed for our purposes. The scales are claimed accurate to 0.10 gr and I have not seen more then that vaiation on my 505, 5-10, 10-10 and yes my Pact digital. BTW, the digital also changes weight when you trickle a charge and lift and replace the pan. It`s called hysteresis and is normal in my limited experiance.

hysteresis

Main Entry: hys·ter·e·sis
Pronunciation: \ˌhis-tə-ˈrē-səs\
Function: noun
Inflected Form(s): plural hys·ter·e·ses \-ˌsēz\
Etymology: New Latin, from Greek hysterēsis shortcoming, from hysterein to be late, fall short, from hysteros later — more at out
Date: 1881
: a retardation of an effect when the forces acting upon a body are changed (as if from viscosity or internal friction); especially : a lagging in the values of resulting magnetization in a magnetic material (as iron) due to a changing magnetizing force

The best way to see if your scale is reading right is get a check weight set and see if the scale agrees with them. If so your set to go, if not call the manufacture and have it repaired.

Bruce H.
December 15, 2007, 12:31 AM
I have a Dillon scale that is very similar to the RCBS 505. I have found that if I remove the gold pan I have to rezero the scale again in order to get a good, accurate measurement after I replace the pan. You cannot remove the pan with powder in it and put it back on the scale again and expect to get same exact measurement. The zero on the scale is dependent on how the pan is situated in the pan holder. If you are concerned about a variation of 0.3 grains when you are measuring out 26 grains, you are asking a lot. A variation of 0.3 grains is only 1.15% of 26 grains. I don't know what the specs are for most scales, but I would expect that +/-1.15% would be an acceptable inaccurracy for a typical scale use for reloading purposes.

jacobhh
December 15, 2007, 05:56 AM
I'm sure you're all correctly using the scale and just discussing
how to describe how the scale works.

jacobhh
December 15, 2007, 06:02 AM
+/-1.15% would be an acceptable inaccurracy for a typical scale use for reloading purposes.

Yes, OK accuracy but lousy repeatability. Consistency is what's
needed. Absolute accuracy is chasing shadows in reloading.

Steve in PA
December 15, 2007, 10:09 AM
Guess my 505 is a freak of nature. After 15 years its still perfect. No problems what so ever.

TEDDY
December 15, 2007, 03:40 PM
Nit picking will drive you crazy.pull some factory rifle cart.and check them.you will blow your stack.
I have Redding/Herter.Lee/Rcbs all are 30 yrs old,they all work.and also Lyman sells check weights cheap.I also have Pact elec and a Smart Reloader
SR750 $29 from midsouth.:uhoh::):confused::)

evan price
December 17, 2007, 12:44 AM
Wow, the same thread resurrected from the past twice. How often does that happen?

Walkalong
December 17, 2007, 08:13 AM
My 505 is just fine.

Master Blaster
December 17, 2007, 08:33 AM
Check your bench and make sure its level use a level to do this. What you describe could be because the surface you have the scale on is not level.

brickeyee
December 17, 2007, 11:34 AM
The knife edges and bearings must be clean.
Completely clean.
No oil.
No dust.
No dirt.

Occasionally a bur can develop on a knife edge if you are not VERY gentle with putting the beam on the bearings, drop even bullets into the pan, or otherwise not treat the scale carefully.
Storing the beam on the bearings is NOT a good idea either.

FieroCDSP
December 17, 2007, 12:19 PM
Wow, the same thread resurrected from the past twice. How often does that happen?

Zombie thread from Hell....

Khornet
December 18, 2007, 03:47 PM
that scale is magnetically damped, I think. At least the end of the beam has a copper plate which passes between two objects that I've always assumed to be magnets. I try to place my scale away from big metal masses and electric or magnetic field sources for that reason. My 505 works fine and has done so for 23 years. But I'll admit I've never stopped to reweigh a charge. I'm anal enough as it is.

Knucklehead2
December 18, 2007, 05:10 PM
I have a 1010 and had similar problems to the OP.
Of course he is probably long gone but mine would suddenly go off a bunch, that is about half a grain.
Frustrated and ready to use the bigger hammer I pulled the covers off that hold the bearing V blocks. Huge burrs on the casting rolled over to where the bearing was supposed to float. Removed the huge burrs and the scale works as advertised.

Walkalong
December 18, 2007, 05:21 PM
But I'll admit I've never stopped to reweigh a charge
Don't do it, it will only hurt your feelings. :banghead:

Steve Koski
December 18, 2007, 05:56 PM
You should upgrade to the Lee Safety Scale.

brickeyee
December 18, 2007, 07:38 PM
"At least the end of the beam has a copper plate which passes between two objects that I've always assumed to be magnets."

No reason to use copper, any metal works for magnetic damping.
As the metal moves i the field currents are induced that try to oppose the motion.
Less motion, less current.
No motion, no force exerted since the beam is not magnetic.

Static electricity on objects near the scale can throw then off though.
Keep plastic objects away from the scale.

no_problem
December 18, 2007, 09:47 PM
I have two 505 scales, one I use, and one I only tested for accuracy...both work fine. I have used the same one since before the '94 gun ban and it has lasted through at least two moves, graduate school, and my marriage. I have never had to use the backup scale, ever.

all this just to say that my RCBS is a terrific scale.

If you are dissatisfied, contact RCBS. I have had excellent support on their products. It works or they replace it, no questions asked. RCBS is a stand up company. No I do not work for RCBS, Over the years, they have earned my loyalty.

Wildfire
December 18, 2007, 10:08 PM
Is that scale on a metal bench?????
They are magnetically dampened. If on a steel bench it will not work right.
These scales always work right , mine has for more then 25 years. Still reads
good with the weights checks.
Check out the steel or something on that order that may be too close to it.

buenhec
December 18, 2007, 10:37 PM
My pact does exactly the same thing. Im thinking of getting a beam scale. It make me nervous.

If you enjoyed reading about "The RCBS 505 Scale is not worth the volume of air it takes up." here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!