Funny news clip about a Marine Sniper


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Rockrivr1
January 10, 2006, 09:20 AM
"While interviewing an anonymous Marine scout sniper on his sniper skills, a Reuters News agent asked him what he felt when shooting members of Al Qaeda in Afghanistan.

The Marine shrugged and replied, "Recoil." "

:D Classic!!!

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1911 guy
January 10, 2006, 09:32 AM
It is a funny take on things, I'm sure NOT what the reporter was looking for. I guess if you're the sentimental type, killing is not a good line of work for you. Just be sure to remain thankful that there are men out there who do this so we have the luxury of sitting this round out.

Khornet
January 10, 2006, 09:42 AM
allegedly asked by an idiot at a cocktail party what he felt when he shot someone, he said, "The recoil of the weapon."

MechAg94
January 10, 2006, 10:44 AM
So, is this just a story going around or is there an actual link someone could post?

Sleeping Dog
January 10, 2006, 03:11 PM
Maybe just a story, looking for a connection to Steven Spielberg's movie "Munich". In the movie, Israeli agents assassinate the terrorists and their leaders who killed the athletes at the 1972 Olympics.

In the movie, the Israeli agents feel remorse, guilt, misgivings about their assigned task. I'm guessing that in real life, the agents felt recoil. And maybe a little satisfaction.

Regards

nbkky71
January 10, 2006, 04:06 PM
I got a feeling that it's just another story going around. I heard the same story last month, but it was CNN and not Reuters.

f4t9r
January 10, 2006, 04:15 PM
still a good answer

Rockrivr1
January 10, 2006, 04:48 PM
It could be just a good story. I got it off of a USPSA list I belong to. First time I had heard it so I thought I'd pass it along.

Mithrandir
January 10, 2006, 04:53 PM
even if not true... it's still a classic line...



out...

ArmedBear
January 10, 2006, 04:54 PM
In the movie, the Israeli agents feel remorse, guilt, misgivings about their assigned task. I'm guessing that in real life, the agents felt recoil. And maybe a little satisfaction.

I saw a documentary on the event. It didn't seem that they felt anything like misgivings or guilt. I think they thought revenge was best served cold, but it seemed that they felt intense pride in their mission, and that they were doing it for their countrymen, their country, and their entire lineage.

losangeles
January 10, 2006, 05:36 PM
Let's not kid ourselves. There's something satisfying about making a kill at a distance, no matter the target.

Not trying to psychoanalyze anything here, but there's a good feeling when you down a man. Even in everyday terms, when you fight, or box, when that man opposite you crumples due to a well-placed blow, it doesn't matter your political affiliations or philosophy, it feels good! It is actually quite addictive, and that's why you get a lot of BG doing it over and over. (It's just being legal and civil in a civilized society that it makes it not a good idea to partake.)

Rezin
January 10, 2006, 06:25 PM
"How can you kill women, and children?"

"Easy, ya just don't lead em as much!"

Billll
January 11, 2006, 12:12 AM
Just Like prarie dogs: Self-resetting pop-up targets. Only with turbans.

Double Naught Spy
January 11, 2006, 01:50 AM
Just Like prarie dogs: Self-resetting pop-up targets. Only with turbans.

Not funny and shows considerable ignorance. Turbans are traditional to Christians, Jews, Hindus, and Muslims.

Hacker15E
January 11, 2006, 07:46 AM
"How can you kill women, and children?"

When I was a new ROTC cadet in the early 90s up at the University of Washington in Seattle, I was surprised to hear the whole 'baby killer' act thrown my way more than once when I was in uniform.

One day I was chatting with a senior cadet, and some guy walked by and sneered, "How do you like killing babies?"

I just ignored him, but the older cadet simply looked at him, smiled, and said, "How do you like paying me to do it?"

1911 guy
January 11, 2006, 07:51 AM
^^^^Classic!^^^^

losangeles
January 11, 2006, 12:03 PM
When I was at the US Naval Academy (Annapolis), when we'd march to a new station, we used to cadence to "Napalm sticks for kids" referring to the unsaid view about the feelings of bombing women and children in Nam. Whenever civilians would come close by, of course, we'd do a difference cadence count.

It's a statement of solidarity and rebelliousness to say, yeah, we'll burn the enemy's women and children, like we do now in Nam on the regular basis, so whatcha gonna do about it, wimp?

Rezin
January 11, 2006, 01:55 PM
When I was at the US Naval Academy (Annapolis), when we'd march to a new station, we used to cadence to "Napalm sticks for kids" referring to the unsaid view about the feelings of bombing women and children in Nam. Dont'cha mean napalm sticks TO kids?


That is what we used to sing in the Corps anyhoo........

losangeles
January 11, 2006, 02:31 PM
Yeah you're right. Some of the guys at the Academy went to the Corps so I'm sure they helped propogate it. (I'm dating myself here as an ol' guy. But not that old - Nam was called off while I was still gettin' my edumacation.) Don't know where it originated though.

p35
January 11, 2006, 02:38 PM
I haven't seen the movie, but in real life I believe the Israelis quit after assasinating some poor schmuck who was in the wrong place and looked like the guy they wanted. I hope they felt remorse for that.

trooper
January 11, 2006, 05:09 PM
I haven't seen the movie, but in real life I believe the Israelis quit after assasinating some poor schmuck who was in the wrong place and looked like the guy they wanted. I hope they felt remorse for that.

Yeah, you're probably talking about this Moroccan waiter in Lillehammer/Norway that was accidentally assassinated by Mossad operatives because they thought he was some Palestinian terrorist.

Stinkyshoe
January 11, 2006, 11:09 PM
In Iraq we are currently using white phosphorus to burn people. It is actually a chemical weapon. Maybe you whitty types would like to make a cadence about that....

p35
January 11, 2006, 11:29 PM
Give me a rhyme for "phosphorus";).

Actually, they used the stuff extensively in WW2, Korea, and Vietnam, without it being called "chemical warfare". Nasty stuff, absolutely, but what does the Army throw at the enemy that isn't?

Langenator
January 12, 2006, 02:31 AM
Willie Pete is only a chemical weapon only in the sense that it is a chemical and it is a weapon. By that standard, napalm, flamethrowers, FAE, and even plain old HE are chemical weapons.

WP burns through an oxidization reaction-meaning it produces heat, a lot of it, on contact with oxygen. It's mostly used nowadays because it produces thick white smoke, which can be used as an obscurant and is also a mild irritant. In other words, it'll make you uncomfortable, and don't just hang around in the stuff. Not much different than any other kind of chemical smoke-like the hand grenades that make pretty colors. Just makes a lot more heat doing it. Oh, it also can be used to scare BGs into thinking it's something nastier, especially when combined with good psyops.

And there's a world of difference between catching civilians with the effects, which happens no matter how hard you try, especially when the bad guys refuse to obey the rules and wear uniforms like proper soldiers, and deliberately targeting civilians. You know, like detonating a car bomb in a makret, or at a Shia shrine.

SIGarmed
January 12, 2006, 02:46 AM
In Iraq we are currently using white phosphorus to burn people. It is actually a chemical weapon. Maybe you whitty types would like to make a cadence about that....

Good. They probably deserve it.

griz
January 12, 2006, 07:56 AM
Preposterous?
Rhinoceros?

KC&97TA
January 12, 2006, 10:32 AM
Let's not kid ourselves. There's something satisfying about making a kill at a distance, no matter the target.

Not trying to psychoanalyze anything here, but there's a good feeling when you down a man. Even in everyday terms, when you fight, or box, when that man opposite you crumples due to a well-placed blow, it doesn't matter your political affiliations or philosophy, it feels good! It is actually quite addictive, and that's why you get a lot of BG doing it over and over. (It's just being legal and civil in a civilized society that it makes it not a good idea to partake.)

except you become addicted to killing worse than any drug, Fallujah... it drives me crazy waiting for the SHTF, always keep my guns loaded and my safe a spin from the last number :uhoh: believe it was in one of Clint Eastwoods movies, the most spiritual thing "to take away a mans life, you take everything he had or ever was going to have"

I liked the Marine with the Marlbro hanging from his mouth picture from Fallujah in Nov 2004, and the interview with him latter were he didn't see the big deal about it, he just wanted a cig, said he was going to smoke a cig on his roof when he got back to the states, just because he could.

WP-is over rated as a chemical weapon, when it's used by the artillery batteries that is people get all butt hurt about its use, from personaly seeing it, it's great, expecialy when used in conjunction with an air-bust fuse. I'd love to see Napalm come back...

There is a cadance about Napalm ...cause napalm sticks to kids, crunchy on the outside gooy on the inside...

TexasRifleman
January 12, 2006, 10:38 AM
In Iraq we are currently using white phosphorus to burn people. It is actually a chemical weapon. Maybe you whitty types would like to make a cadence about that....


Willie Pete is not considered a chemical weapon by any international treaty or agreement, nor is it's effectiveness derived by using it on people.

Maybe you might want to do a little research next time and not get your information from the movies.

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