Springfield Mil-Spec triggers


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Candiru
January 11, 2006, 11:56 PM
I'm seriously considering getting a stainless Springfield mil-spec as my first 1911. After using my local range's rental Springfield GI (hopefully close enough to the Mil-Spec to count), I'm satisfied with the gun's performance, reliability, and handling.

The only complaint I have concerns the trigger weight, which is pretty heavy. I'm not a match-grade prima donna, nor do I want a very light trigger (since I intend to carry this gun), but six pounds of pull starts to impair my already meager aim.

I don't want to buy the Cylinder & Slide trigger-job-in-a-box because that involves replacing the stock hammer, which I happen to really like. Given these restrictions, about how much is it going to cost me to have a smith lighten the trigger to around 4.5 pounds? Or are there other options to improve the pull?

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bluto
January 12, 2006, 02:26 AM
Excellent choice.

I have 2 parkerized Mil Specs. Both are great pistols and have performed flawlessly. Both are very accurate and shoot like much more expensive models. But I agree with you. The weak point can be the trigger.

SA generally releases their Mil Specs with an "N" serial number. Those, I understand, are manufactured and fitted by Imbel in Brazil. They do a great job. Occasionally SA releases a batch of "NM" serial numbered Mil Specs. These are reportedly manufactured in Brazil but fitted and assembled by Springfield here in the states. The NM prefix does NOT stand for national match as some people think. But the NM prefix pistols do have subtle differences:

The finish and stampings are a bit nicer. The parkerization is nicer. The NM models come with a stainless barrel and bushing. And, in the models that I've handled, the trigger is lighter.

I have one model of each. An N prefix and an NM prefix. I paid about $50 more for the NM model.

The N prefix model (and most GI models that I've handled) came with a 6# trigger. It feels heavy and I'm thinking of getting a trigger job. My NM prefix model came with a 4# trigger. It was perfect right OTB.

Both are equally accurate, but the NM model is much easier to shoot consistantly well because of the light trigger.

You might want to shop around for an NM prefix serial number model. No guarantee, but you may not need a trigger job if you get lucky.


Here's an excellent review with target pics if you're interested:

http://www.hipowersandhandguns.com/Critical%20Look%20at%20Springfield%20Mil%20Spec.htm

Candiru
January 12, 2006, 02:48 AM
Thanks for the info, Bluto. A local store has a Mil-Spec, so I'll check its serial number and trigger. As for the Stephen Camp article, I'm already familiar with it; in fact, his review helped me settle on the Mil-Spec. I trust Mr. Camp's articles a great deal, in part because of his thoroughness and conscientious objectivity, in part because we appear to have almost identical tastes in pistols.

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