What gun safe for $800?


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VTX
January 12, 2006, 04:41 PM
I'm looking for a new gun safe. I'd like to keep it around $800. What do people think of the American Eagle AE31 (http://www.cannonsafe.com/safesamericaneagle/#ae)?

Looks like a nice one to me, but I don't know a lot about them. Thanks!

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hso
January 12, 2006, 05:26 PM
Welcome to the forum!

New guy usually buys the ammo, but since your first post is on safes you can get the dessicant for everyone.;)

One of the things that I've learned here is that a "gun safe" isn't usually a safe at all by professional standards and that a real safe to keep thieves out will cost quite a bit.

The AE is a good "gun safe" and remember that you want lots of dessicant (or a dehumidifier)


That said, check all these and look for anything that member CB900F has to say. http://thehighroad.org/search.php?searchid=1009693

a1abdj
January 12, 2006, 11:01 PM
You can get more safe for the same money.

We sell imported safes which are made by the same factories that make many of the safes for the other big name companies. The safes we have are heavier (1/4" doors, and 10 ga. bodies), but otherwise fairly similar. You can save money by not having the name on the door.

Highland Ranger
January 12, 2006, 11:34 PM
do a search on "residential security container" you'll find lots of similar threads.

Few guys in the business here as well, CB900F is one that comes to mind . . . .

LiquidTension
January 13, 2006, 02:17 AM
If you can wait, Academy Sports runs 25% coupons every few months. They don't include guns and ammo, but there is no exclusion for safes - excuse me CB900F, I meant RSCs :p Next time one pops up, I'm heading up to Greenville to take home a $1000 safe for $750.

coylh
January 13, 2006, 02:49 AM
Gun safes are usually a long term investment. You may want to save a little longer and get something better. That said, you can get one of these in that price range: http://www.libertysafe.com/Safe_Centurion23.lasso

VTX
January 13, 2006, 10:27 AM
Thanks for all the input!

...edited...

Sorry, I just deleted all that stuff I wrote. After doing a search on CB900R's posts I realize that I had no idea what I was talking about.

VTX
January 13, 2006, 10:50 AM
EDIT...nevermind. See above post.

Starter52
January 13, 2006, 11:58 AM
I agree with coylh. I have a Liberty Centurian that I bought on sale for $799. It seems a good solid safe. I have complete confidence in it.

Highland Ranger
January 13, 2006, 12:35 PM
I made the same decision back a few years ago when I needed to upgrade - either buy the cheapo stack-on metal cabinets that offer nominal protection against casual theft, or go for the full house setup.

Stuff in between looks pretty but doesn't give you the bang for the buck you'd expect.

a1abdj
January 13, 2006, 02:33 PM
I agree with coylh. I have a Liberty Centurian that I bought on sale for $799. It seems a good solid safe. I have complete confidence in it.

I'm not trying to stir anything up here, but I have often pondered this question. As a professional in the safe business, I am often asked to deliver safes for other area retailers who sell them. The people I deliver these safes to often make very similar comments, but I do not want to ask them, for fear of them getting me in hot water with the store.

You say you have complete confidence in this safe. What excact confidences do you have?

In theory, what would you expect out of your safe in a burglary attempt? What tools, methods, or force to you think your safe would resist? Do you think that your safe has any weaknesses? If so, what are they?

What would you expect out of your safe in a fire? What items inside your safe would survive a fire without damage? What items may be damaged?

I believe that many people buy these safes with very little truthful information regarding the construction or function of these types of units. I don't want to taint any replies with my experiences, so I would like to hear from a few of you that also have complete confidence in the safes that you have before I reply.

MrChicken
January 13, 2006, 02:36 PM
My 2cents...

Buy a safe much bigger than you think you want. I did and it's full, was full on day 1. When you have a safe, it suddenly seems like there are a lot of things that belong in it besides guns.

If you are going to open it alot, you should consider a keypad instead of a dial. If you want to keep your HD gun in the safe, get a keypad.

If your house is kept at reasonable humidity levels and you open the safe regularly, you dont need a dehumidifier.

Put your big hammers and pry bars in the safe. That will keep the novices from trying to use your tools to break into the safe. They wont get in that way, but they dont know that and they will screw up the lock and door bad enough that you wont be able to get in it either.

VTX
January 13, 2006, 02:55 PM
My 2cents...

Buy a safe much bigger than you think you want. I did and it's full, was full on day 1. When you have a safe, it suddenly seems like there are a lot of things that belong in it besides guns.

If you are going to open it alot, you should consider a keypad instead of a dial. If you want to keep your HD gun in the safe, get a keypad.

If your house is kept at reasonable humidity levels and you open the safe regularly, you dont need a dehumidifier.

Put your big hammers and pry bars in the safe. That will keep the novices from trying to use your tools to break into the safe. They wont get in that way, but they dont know that and they will screw up the lock and door bad enough that you wont be able to get in it either.

Thanks for the advice. The AE31 I'm tentatively looking at will already hold lots more guns than I own. I know what you mean about finding other things to put in there too! I've already started compiling a mental list of things I want to put in it! :D

My HD gun will definitely NOT be in the safe. It stays either on my person or within arms reach.

I have a dehumidifier in the room that the safe is in, but I will also probably get one or two of those dessicant cans that Cabelas has.

Good advice about the tools. I won't keep anything out that might be used against the safe...er RSC.

CB900F
January 14, 2006, 01:48 AM
Starter52;

Sir, no flames intended, but I'm going to be even blunter than a1abdj. Liberty RSC's are simply not quality protection IMHO. They do not have plate steel doors, they have a sheet metal wrap on an insulating core. The Centurian is not a high-end Liberty, therefore it has very thin sheet metal on the 5 sides other than the door.

I have a door in my shop that while it is not a Liberty, it is built in the manner of a Liberty. An area business bought the safe as a fire/burglary unit from another dealer in state. A fifteen year old boy, on his first known felony crime, broke into the business through a locked back door, then broke the locked office door, and peeled the 'safe' & got an approximate $5,000.00 out of it in far less than 30 minutes. We know the time period because that's how long the owner was out of the business. The kid was not hanging around when he left, & was not running away when he came back.

Your fire protection is 1200 degrees f for 30 minutes according to the Liberty brochure I have. And it's, woo-hoo, tested to the "OMEGA" standard. The salesman probably told you that you've nothing to worry about since the average home fire is 1200 degrees. The trick word is average. Oily rag in the garage, cooking oil fire in the kitchen, etc. all quickly & easily put out, count. And because they count, and there's more of that type of fire, it brings the average down. But when there's a major fire in the home, frame of the house is burning, the temps are well above 1200 degrees f. Our professional fire dept. tells us that 1600 to 2000 degrees, or more, are typical, depending on fuel sources & point in the fire cycle.

If your Liberty is in the same room as that type of fire, it's highly likely you'll open it to charred stocks & warped scope tubes. What will you have saved?
In other words, Dr. Feelgood sells 'safes' as well as pushes pills.

900F

Sir Aardvark
January 14, 2006, 03:15 AM
Check out Costco.com for some pretty good safe prices.

They carry Liberty and Cannon safes and others too.

The prices listed include curb-side or in-home delivery.

http://www.costco.com/Common/Category.aspx?cat=29105&eCat=BC|114|29105&whse=BC&topnav=

Of course, there is a catch....you must be a member:

http://www.costco.com/Common/Category.aspx?cat=503&eCat=BC|502|503


About once a year, around July or so, they will have a sale on selected models of about $200.00 off or so.

coylh
January 14, 2006, 04:49 PM
CB900F, the poster is looking to spend $800. Which RSC/Safe would you recommend that outperforms the various models (Liberty, etc) at that price?

CB900F
January 14, 2006, 11:06 PM
Coylh;

One with at least a 1/4" plate steel door. Then the heaviest, read lowest #, gauge metal sides, top, bottom, I could find. The higher the gauge number, the thinner the metal. There's no way I can keep track of all the RSC makers out there. I know the product put out by the majors, but by naming names I could very well ignore a limited area company that makes a good product for the money. Ironman was one. They are OOB now, more's the pity. If you're on a budget & can find a used one, go for it. At least they are 10 gauge walls & 1/4" plate door.

900F

Quinch
January 15, 2006, 02:23 AM
Check your local locksmiths, I had one order my Cannon Traditional for about 40% less than the retail stores wanted.

VTX
January 16, 2006, 10:17 AM
I've decided to hold off on buying anything for now. After searching CB900F's posts and talking to a1abdj I've realized that the AE31 I was looking at would not be that great of a buy.

I'm tentatively looking at the Amsec BF series. Still just an RSC, but certainly better. However, for that much money I'm wondering if it wouldn't almost be better to just go for a real safe.

More things to think about. For now I'm just going to hold off and mull things over. Thanks for allt he info guys.

TheEgg
January 18, 2006, 03:40 PM
While I certainly appreciate the input of those in the safe business, and have avidly read their information over the years, I must say a couple of things.

1) Keep in mind the value of what you are protecting. I have one RSC that is completely full of C&R rifles for example. If you had a good auction day, I guess you might get $2,000 out of the lot. I have them, as well as all my firearms, insured. It makes no sense to me to purchase a $4,000 safe for this purpose.

2) If you have money, and use it to purchase high dollar firearms, such as custom/engraved rifle and shotguns, by all means go for the high dollar safes. Indeed, if you are in that market, get a custom built vault room.

3)Someone asked about the phrase "complete confidence". That is subjective. I have complete confidence in my lowly, leper like, RSC's in this fashion: I know that a determined person, with some minimal set of tools will probably be able to break into them. The average teenager/drunk/druggie looking for a quick snatch and grab probably will not. I am not trying to defeat the well equipped, determined safe cracker. That is what insurance is for. My safes are to defeat the 'amatuer' criminal. I figure this is the guy that is much more likely to break into my house than the guy who is prepared to peel an RSC.

4.) Think about where the poster is coming from. While I respect the two safe dealers who have posted on this thread, and believe every single thing they have posted, I think that they naturally lean to the high end products. Hey, if I sold cars, and I sold Beemers, and MB's, I might lean to those products as well, perhaps forgetting that for a lot of us the choice is not between a MB or BMW, but between and KIA and a Hyundai. Since I am in the later group, there is just absolutely no way that I can afford that 635i, so don't tell me that I might as well walk if I can't afford it.

a1abdj
January 18, 2006, 08:24 PM
Think about where the poster is coming from. While I respect the two safe dealers who have posted on this thread, and believe every single thing they have posted, I think that they naturally lean to the high end products.

I sell a lot more $400 gun safes than I do $6,000 gun safes :D

I also sell and install modular vault systems and doors, but don't think I have ever recommended one of those for a gun collector.

What it comes down to is a waste of money. If you have something worth protecting, then there are various ways to protect it. There's no sense in buying a $600 gun safe if a $20 dead bolt on a closet door will provide the same amount of security.

Security products, like all other forms of insurance, have a number of variables. The whole notion is a balancing act. I don't have any problems with the $400 safes that I sell, so long as my customers understand their limits. I do have a problem with all of these safe "dealers" that know nothing about safes filling peoples heads with false information.

An average person can get into an average gun safe with average hand tools in a very short period of time (single digit minutes). Yet no matter how many of these dealers you speak with, none will tell you this. They say things like "nobody has ever broken into one of xyz's safes" or "nobody will walk off with this".

And for the customers.....remember the 10% rule. You will spend approximately 10% of your collection's worth on a safe properly designed to protect that collection. If you have $20,000 worth of guns, I wouldn't keep them in a $500 safe.

CB900F
January 18, 2006, 08:35 PM
Fella's;

The Egg raises a perfectly valid point, you should match the value of the container to the contents. However, leaving the mil-surp market out of it, I'd say the average cost of a typical firearm these days is in the mid-hundreds range. Just to make it perfectly median, let's say $500.00. So, my hypothetical buyer tells me he's got 6 long guns, 8 pistols. & anticipates 100% growth before he thinks he'll be done buying. Plus all the other stuff that tends to get put in the safe. Now we've got $7,000 in firearms with another $7,000 on the horizon. If we are talking one Citori, one Remington VLS with good glass, and one S&W 629, that covers the cost of a rated safe. If even half of the rest are in the same cost class, well, what can you afford to lose?

Do you want your insurance company, and perhaps other entities, to know by S/N what you own? Do you want to pay the rather substantial extra rider premium to insure the guns? Or, would you rather maintain your, and your firearms, privacy & turn the premium money towards real protection? Reasonable questions IMHO.

900F

TheEgg
January 19, 2006, 01:30 PM
Do you want your insurance company, and perhaps other entities, to know by S/N what you own? Do you want to pay the rather substantial extra rider premium to insure the guns? Or, would you rather maintain your, and your firearms, privacy & turn the premium money towards real protection? Reasonable questions IMHO.

Absolutely reasonable questions. Everyone should answer these questions and do the calculations you suggest before making their decision. And, no matter how good the safe I had, I would still want insurance, because no safe that I could reasonably expect to put in my house would be proof against all potential intruders, thus the belt and suspenders approach.;)

BTW, I DON'T have to list my firearms by serial number for my insurance carrier.

coylh
January 21, 2006, 09:39 PM
Anyone want to do a "box of truth" for RSCs? I'd like to see someone break into one. Hey, there's an episode of Myth Busters!

a1abdj
January 22, 2006, 06:22 PM
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v627/a1abdj/libertyburglary2.jpg

A RSC rating involves 5 minutes without entry using common hand tools (hammer and 18" screwdriver to my understanding).

Some RSC safes use 12 ga. steel doors (1/10"), some RSC safes have 1/2" steel plate with composite construction behind that. Needless to say, there are some RSC safes which are better than others.

Same holds true for your high end safes. Just because 2 different safes meet the same minimum requirements doesn't mean that one will not outperform the other.

Also, UL testing for an RSC label runs around $10,000 I think. Some companies don't invest that kind of money just to put a sticker on the safe door. I have seen plenty of non-rated safes far more secure than many of those with an RSC rating.

Also keep in mind that many of the UL burglar ratings involve hand tools, pressure applying devices, power tools, cutting torches, and explosives. The RSC rating is strictly a test against a few small hand tools.

CB900F
January 22, 2006, 09:51 PM
Fella's;

a1abdj is absolutely correct in his assessment of the test tools/time that an RSC has to withstand in order to qualify for its rating.

As a side note, the box that's been compromised in a1a's picture has what looks to be a decent plate door. But notice the corners of the box. See how they are rounded? That's a pretty good indication that we are looking at formed sheet metal, not plate steel. See the ventilation port in the side wall? That's there so your 'safe' won't have a micro-climate inside & rust your guns. Oh, wait! I'm not selling RSC's!! I sell safes.

CB900F@bresnan.net :D

900F

Highland Ranger
January 23, 2006, 09:20 PM
what are we looking at in the picture? how was the hole made?

a1abdj
January 23, 2006, 10:35 PM
what are we looking at in the picture? how was the hole made?

That's a 500 poundish Liberty Centurion. 12 gauge steel. Hole was made with a sledge or axe, and the estimated time was 5 to 6 minutes.

As a side note, the box that's been compromised in a1a's picture has what looks to be a decent plate door.

Which is another trick of the gun safe trade. Take 12 gauge steel, wrap it around a layer or two of gypsum board, and it makes the door look thick. In reality, the door of this safe is just as thin as the body.

TheEgg
January 24, 2006, 11:47 AM
a1abdj

Could you tell me where that picture came from? Is it yours?

Thanks.

a1abdj
January 24, 2006, 01:25 PM
The photo and information on the safe came from a friend of mine who is a Federal LEO. The safe was in Texas I believe.

I do all of the local Liberty deliveries, and I can attest that the safe in the photo is a Liberty Centurion.

I get to see many safes like this, but in my line of work photos are rare.

TheEgg
January 24, 2006, 02:05 PM
Any chance of getting more details from your friend? I am particularly interested in the fact that there appear to be two holes in the safe, one in the door and one on the right side. I wonder why?

Nuclearmike
January 24, 2006, 02:22 PM
What I'd like to know is how much protection will defeat an attack like the one pictured above. It's obvious that 12 gauge doesn't cut the mustard. It seems as though most gun safes have a RSC rating which, judging from the picture, doesn't mean a whole lot in terms of burglary resistance. On the other hand, a safe that is big enough to put a few rifles in and has a TL15 rating weighs and costs a ton. How thick should the side plates be? 1/4 inch, 1/2 inch?

Mike

a1abdj
January 24, 2006, 03:28 PM
Any chance of getting more details from your friend? I am particularly interested in the fact that there appear to be two holes in the safe, one in the door and one on the right side. I wonder why?

I have additional photos of the front of the safe. Apparently one person was working on the door, and another on the side. The person on the side was able to get in fastest. This was strictly a beating attack. There was no use of prybars.

How thick should the side plates be? 1/4 inch, 1/2 inch?

That is all relative to the type of attack. I would imagine you could beat a hole through a 1/4" plate also, it would just take a little longer. I don't think you could hammer your way through 1/2", but you could peel it or cut it.

Although the AMSEC BF series only uses a 10 gauge outer wall, it does use a concrete fill for insulation which adds to the burglary resistance. I have never taken an axe to one, but would imagine it would last much longer than a safe which uses 10 gauge steel and gypsum board inside.

I don't have a problem with these lightweight gun safes. If you are looking for minimal burglary protection and to keep the kids out, then they can't be beat. If you're using the gun safe for valuable guns or anything other than guns, you should look into something better designed for those purposes.

When you have the types of valuables which require a real safe, then the cost of the safe shouldn't be an issue. Especially if any of those valuables are not replaceable or heirlooms.

Nuclearmike
January 24, 2006, 04:17 PM
"If you are looking for minimal burglary protection"

Minimal being the key word here. Wow. 6 minutes with an axe. That ain't much.

"When you have the types of valuables which require a real safe, then the cost of the safe shouldn't be an issue."

My biggest fear is not the financial loss that would come with having my firearms stolen but, rather that they would end up used in some violent crime. How does one put a price tag on that? I'm not trying to start an argument here. I am literally trying to figure out what kinds of things to look at when I am purchasing these things. I know that everything is a compromise. More protection=more weight and more cost, etc. But I don't want to be fooled into thinking that my firearms are safe or as safe as I can reasonably make given the resources I have when they are really inside a glorified locker.

I am beginning to wonder if it is worthwhile to look at reconditioned safes rescued out of banks and such as an economical and safer alternative to these fancy looking RCSs.

RaetherEnt
January 24, 2006, 05:11 PM
I am beginning to wonder if it is worthwhile to look at reconditioned safes rescued out of banks and such as an economical and safer alternative to these fancy looking RCSs.

Thats a good point Mike! Right now my guns are in a safe that I purchased from Cabelas, and, while I know that it isn't the strongest safe in the world, It is in a basement room that is also entered into through a steel door that is dead-bolted. My thinking is that a thief has to enter the house, decide that the strongest door in the house is the one worth breaking into, and IF so, get through THAT door, and THEN through the safe...ALL during the same time that the alarm is sounding and the police are being called via digital phone and cell service. Thankfully, police response in my neighborhood is about four minutes, so unless the Oceans 11 crew is on the job, I think I'm good. However...

Back to NuclearMikes point, I have been researching just that. My wife and I are currently finalizing plans for the construction of our NEW house, and one of the things that this house will have in the basement is a walk-in safe, which will also serve as a safe room. Can you say..."Rusty Shackelford???" Anyways, my buddy the engineer, has approached me with exactly that idea, that is, finding an old safe door from a bank to use as the walk in door. I'm loving the idea! Now...where to find one???

Highland Ranger
January 24, 2006, 06:13 PM
Thing that always concerned me about any mods to the house is that the contractor would know and a secret isnt a secret if more than one person knows.

Make sure the plans say "wine cellar" or something else other than "safe to store all my really expensive stuff"

And speaking of secrets . . . . that's your best bet. Concealment combined with a decent safe . . . . .

a1abdj
January 24, 2006, 07:08 PM
There are plenty of safes on the used market which cost less than some of these gun safes, and offer far better protection. I get these safes on occasion, but if they're big enough for guns, they sell fast.

Although I don't advertise in the Yellow Pages, many others do, and you can find safe dealers which handled used safes under "Safes & Vaults".

We have been doing more and more vault installations inside of homes the last few years. If you're going to go with a lightweight door (Fort Knox, Browning, etc...), you're going to be facing the same problems you are with their safes. They don't offer a lot of security.

There are plenty of used bank quality doors on the market, but they are not really a do it yourself job. There's a lot that goes into installing one of these doors that only comes with experience. There are also modular vault systems, which all of the banks are using now, which come in panels and are welded together in place.

The nice thing about modular vaults is that they are light weight (as far as vaults go), inexpensive (compared to a poured in place vault), and can be installed in an existing building. You can also take them apart and take them with you if you move.

On new construction, our vaults are shown on the blueprints as a storm shelter.

Hot brass
January 24, 2006, 08:45 PM
I'm looking for a new gun safe. I'd like to keep it around $800.

A buddy has one and turned me onto this safe.

I have a Visalia Safes Safe. Nothing Fancy, from top to bottom it is a 1/4" and 5/16", 36" x 24" x 72" well over 1000# piece of security. I paid about $800.00. I sold a Browning Pro Steel to get this safe.

Viaslia Safes is located in Visalia, California. I bought direct from the factory.
The owner is a very nice man. The link is down, but one should be able to contact him, one way or another.

I looked at Liberty, Centry, and some other thin walled safes (my Pro Steel was thin walled) and thought how easy they could be compromised by a chissel and or a big hammer.

I am glad that I bought the Visalia Safe.

CB900F
January 24, 2006, 11:37 PM
Fella's;

Or, you can come to me. We do vault doors, either standard or custom fit. The minimum is an 1/2" A36 plate steel door panel. Internal safety release is also standard. Other than that, you can have pretty much anything you want. Want the door 1.5" thick with a manganese insert? Can do. Any PP&G automotive color is available. Spoke door handles, rebar weldment points, extended flanges, no problem.

However, if you are seriously considering a vault door or building a vault room & getting the door, have your contractor contact us before you build! I have seen people build the home & then want a door approaching a ton in weight to be manuvered through the home & taken down wood stairs - all without putting a scratch on anything, 'cause it's a new home ya know.

The door should go in the basement before the floor joists are laid. Period.

900F

razcob
January 25, 2006, 12:36 AM
If it is that easy to open a 12 gauge safe with an axe, is it a waste of money to spend the extra money and purchase a 3/16" outerbody? If it takes 3 swings to open a 12 gauge; does it take 6 swings to open a 3/16" outerbody?

CB900F
January 25, 2006, 10:20 AM
Razcob;

The Underwriter's Laboratory, U.L., won't rate anything a safe until & unless all 6 sides are at least 1/4" plate steel. Therefore 3/16" sidewall is still 25% short of the mark.

I don't think that the penetration factor is strictly linear, in fact, I'm pretty sure it isn't. But U.L. obviously doesn't think that 3/16" gives enough addtional protection to warrant the designation safe from their organization.

The Liberty Presidential is, I think, the only RSC in their line that upgrades the body wall thickness to 3/16", all the rest are guage sheet metal. IMHO the price of the Presidential approaches that of a true safe, but still falls far short in protective ability. Fort Knox has several units that also use 3/16" for body construction. At one time our shop seriously considered taking on F-K, but upon analysis we concluded that the cost/benefit ratio was too high on the cost & too short on the protection. Fort Knox is probably the best of the batch in RSC's. However, in any of the high-end RSC's the rule of 80/20 makes buying one a difficult decision.

900F

JohnBT
January 25, 2006, 11:05 AM
If you'd like to explore what 5 or 10 thousand dollars will buy...

www.brownsafe.com/categories/80A98312-FA4D-9E42-B9A9677D2724847D/models.html

If you check out the wall specs they're talking 1/4", 1/2" and up.

I mostly fear the smash and grab crack addict.

John

a1abdj
January 25, 2006, 12:18 PM
AMSEC builds a burglar rated gun safe as does Graffunder. I am not a dealer for Graffunder, but those are the two companies I point people to when they need something more than a standard gun safe will offer.

ogso
January 25, 2006, 02:39 PM
While on the subject, 900F and a1abdj, what is your opinion on a "quick vault" or a between the studs safe for a place to keeps guns accessable yet secure?

Hot brass
January 26, 2006, 04:16 PM
While on the subject, 900F and a1abdj, what is your opinion on a "quick vault" or a between the studs safe for a place to keeps guns accessable yet secure?

I know that you did not ask me, but I have a small wall safe inbetween wall studs. For quick access if it is not electronic where are you going to keep the key? My wife keeps small amount of jewelery and petty cash in the wall safe. IMHO, it is better than nothing. If you have a saw the safe is gone in minutes. Bust the sheetrock make four cuts and you have a safe. I thought of this AFTER I installed the safe. Hence, I don`t keep any guns in the wall safe. Just in the 1000# PLUS gun safe. I sleep good at night knowing that to get my guns will be an easy thing to do.

CB900F
January 26, 2006, 09:37 PM
Fellas';

The 'wall safe', in most cases isn't. Hot Brass brought up the matter of how easily most of them are compromised, and he's correct in that assessment. On the other hand, the manual combination dial is proven technology, no batteries & no keys either.

There are wall safes that are serious protection, but they are built into brick or concrete walls in almost every case. No sawzall theft in that case, but the planning beforehand is substantial.

The single best aspect of the wall safe is stealth. If they can't find it, it's pretty hard to compromise it. But, the wall safe concept is almost a cliche it's so well known. Serious creativity is necessary to stealth one these days.

900F

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