2 articles on body armor.


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wingnutx
January 13, 2006, 03:00 PM
Guess which one gets top billing.


Many Iraq Deaths Blamed on Body Armor

Most torso wounds that killed Marines in Iraq might have been prevented or minimized by improved body armor, a Pentagon study found...

WASHINGTON - Most torso wounds that killed Marines in Iraq might have been prevented or minimized by improved body armor, a Pentagon study found.

http://www.military.com/NewsContent/0,13319,84769,00.html?ESRC=dod-b.nl


Use of More Armor Questioned

Soldiers in the field were not all supportive of a Pentagon study that found improved body armor saves lives. Some troops argued that more armor would hinder combat effectiveness...

"These guys over here are husbands, sons and daughters. It's understandable people at home would want all the protection in the world for us. But realistically, it just don't work," said Sgt. Paul Hare, 40, of Tucumcari, N.M.

http://www.military.com/NewsContent/0,13319,84787,00.html?ESRC=dod-b.nl


At least it's better than Yahoo's version:

Most Marines killed in Iraq could have been saved by body armor (http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20060107/wl_afp/usiraqmilitaryreport)


I am so sick of hearing that we don't get issued decent armor, or any armor at all. I still hear garbage about families holding bake sales to buy their kid armor.

Anyone else remember a popular bumper sticker hoping for the great day when the military would have to hold bakes sales? I used to see those a lot growing up. Now the same people are pretending it's real and using it as propaganda.

/vent

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Pilgrim
January 13, 2006, 03:57 PM
The German's Tiger Tank in WWII was heavily armored...and it was also very underpowered.

Pilgrim

MTMilitiaman
January 13, 2006, 04:21 PM
My brother wrote a venomous, scathing, and simply just hostile email detailing his utter disapproval for some shoulder protectors they did are are trying to add to their IBAs. His main complaint was lack of mobility. He said it almost made him feel like a penguin and that it was likely to get more people killed than it saved. He didn't like it at all, but of course, he shares the same opinion of the M16. He just starts to cuss when you mention it. Usually the first three words out of his mouth are "Peice of ****" followed by "I ******* hate it." He threatened to pound his M4A4 against the ground until it broke in half if the armorer didn't fix it, Article 15 be damned. He told them give me a rifle that works and isn't going to get me killed or discharge me. Sounds extreme but it worked.
Anyways, some soldiers are more satisfied than others with their gear over there.

Sergeant Sabre
January 14, 2006, 10:48 AM
I have personal experience with the currently-issued interceptor vest. The vest only is not bad at all. When you add the neck and throat guards and crotch protector it gets cumbersome. Adding the SAAPI plates (ceramic plates in front and/or back for protection from rifle rounds) makes the thing just ridiculous. It's terribly heavy with those plates, and restrictive to mobility.

However, I also personally read one unit report in which an individual was shot right in the chest by a sniper and was uninjured because of the plate. There was also a video on this board of a similar incident a while back.

It's a trade-off. What would I want? Well, that would depend on whether or not I was hit. :D

Sylvilagus Aquaticus
January 14, 2006, 03:03 PM
http://www.physorg.com/news8947.html

NOTE: The photo of armor pictured is medieval production.

What they're talking about here is nanotube construction.

So far, it looks promising.

Regards,
Rabbit.
-------------------

year ago IsraCast reported on the development of the first commercial nano-based lubricant which was developed by the Israeli company ApNano materials. A year later we find ApNano working also on a wholly different application of their technology - shielding and protection. In recent research lead by Prof. Yan Qiu Zhu of the School of Mechanical, Materials and Manufacturing Engineering at the University of Nottingham, England, a sample of the ApNano material was subjected to severe shocks generated by a steel projectile traveling at velocities of up to 1.5 km/second. The material withstood the shock pressures generated by the impacts of up to 250 tons per square centimeter. This is approximately equivalent to dropping four diesel locomotives onto an area the size of one’s fingernail. During the test the material proved to be so strong that after the impact the samples remained essentially identical compared to the original material. Additionally, a recent study by Prof. J. M. Martin from Ecole Central de Lyon in France tested the new material under isostatic pressure and found it to be stable up to at least 350 tons/cm2.

In the line of fire - creating super shock-resistant materials

In order to understand how it is possible to create this ultra-strong shock absorbing material we first need to understand the nature of the nano material developed by ApNano. In the early 1990's the Nano-materials Synthesis Group in the Weizmann institute headed by Professor Reshef Tenne, ApNano Chief Scientific Advisor, and recent winner of the Materials Research Society medal, together with Dr. Menachem Genut, currently the President and CEO of ApNano Materials, Prof. Gary Hodes and Dr. Lev Margulis, discovered a new class of inorganic nanostructures.

The group had found that certain inorganic compounds such as WS2, MoS2, TiS2 and NbS2 that normally occur as large flat platelets can be synthesized into much smaller nano-spheres and nano-tubes which they named inorganic fullerene-like nanostructures or IF for short. Fullerenes are a new form of carbon, other forms being diamond, graphite and coal. They are molecules composed entirely of carbon, taking the form of a hollow sphere, ellipsoid, or tube. Spherical fullerenes are sometimes called buckyballs, while cylindrical fullerenes are called buckytubes or nanotubes. Buckyballs are named after R. Buckminster Fuller, architect of the geodesic dome that he designed for the 1967 Montreal World Exhibition. IF materials are Fullerene-like materials but instead of being composed out of carbon they can be created from various other inorganic elements.

The new IF material produced by the Weizmann Group was made of Tungsten Disulfide (WS2). In contrast to organic Fullerenes, IF is easier and much less expensive to produce, it is chemically stable and is less reactive and consequently less flammable. Organic Fullerenes are also considered to be highly toxic while IF materials have been tested extensively and deemed safe. Tungsten Disulfide is relatively heavy and for that reason ApNano is currently experimenting with other materials such as Titanium Disulfide which is at least four times lighter and is expected to perform even better than Tungsten Disulfide against shock waves. One of the most interesting new IF properties discovered by ApNano is its extremely high degree of shock absorbing ability. Shock absorbing materials are commonly used in impact resistant applications such as ballistic protection personal body armor, bullet proof vests, vehicle armor, shields, helmets, and protective enclosures. The new Tungsten based IF material has up to twice the strength of the best impact resistant materials currently used in protective armor applications such as boron carbide and silicon carbide, and are over 5 times stronger than steel. It is also possible to combine IF with other substances in order to expand their rage of capabilities. For instance, mixing IF with highly elastic materials can lead to new compounds which are both flexible and shock-absorbing. These properties position IF materials as one of the best candidates for future protective gear and armor.

Currently ApNano can manufacture only a few kilograms of the new material a day at their lab in Nes Ziona. In an interview by IsraCast, Dr. Menachem Genut, ApNano CEO, explained that the company is moving into semi-industrial manufacturing within the next six months producing between 100-200 kilograms of the material per day, gradually moving to full-scale industrial production by 2007, creating several tons each day. Although it is currently still hard to determine the exact price of the "nano-armor" when in full industrial production, given the cost of the original materials (Tungsten Disulfide, Titanium Disulfide, etc.) and the relatively low production costs, Dr. Genut stated that a kilogram of the new material will cost considerably less than a similar amount of the carbon-based Fullerenes. More field testing will need to be carried out before the nano-armor can be declared commercial but the company is optimistic that with some external financial backing it will be possible to have the first product ready in less then three years.

by Iddo Genuth - IsraCast

wingnutx
January 14, 2006, 11:00 PM
One guy I worked with in Iraq took 3 shot from in the chest an AK at point blank, and was fine. Of course, the rounds that hit his arm messed him up a bit.

You get used to the weight and cumbersomness of the vest, but it's always a beyatch trying to get out of a humvee wearing the darn thing.

Any more ceramic and I'd waddle like a penguin.

roo_ster
January 14, 2006, 11:25 PM
I recall (not so fondly) doing runs in RBA (Range Body Armor). It was heavy with front & rear plates. It wasn't too bad WRT limb movement, though.

THe new stuff looks more protective, but also looks more restrictive.

VirgilCaine
January 14, 2006, 11:42 PM
I have personal experience with the currently-issued interceptor vest. The vest only is not bad at all. When you add the neck and throat guardsand crotch protector it gets cumbersome. Adding the SAAPI plates (ceramic plates in front and/or back for protection from rifle rounds) makes the thing just ridiculous. It's terribly heavy with those plates, and restrictive to mobility.

However, I also personally read one unit report in which an individual was shot right in the chest by a sniper and was uninjured because of the plate. There was also a video on this board of a similar incident a while back.


COOL! I didn't know about those.

But, duh. That's what the plates do.

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