Anyone reloading shotgun?


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Bill Z
January 16, 2006, 06:49 PM
My daughter purchased a MEC 600 for me this Christmas along with bringing us a sackfull or hulls from the range, powder, wads, primers, and shot. We've loaded about 150 shells, she did most of them, but I'm running low on shot. I forgot to ask the club manager where he gets his supplies and how much they are, and am just trying to work the math out on this. It'sice making lighter loead for my daughter to shoot (well for me too) since we are both getting into shooting clays and I am starting to put on some three-gun and tactical matches. I just want to see if it's worth the time.

Sources anyone?

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HSMITH
January 16, 2006, 09:53 PM
Shot around here is up to $19 per bag.

Your best bet will be to ask around at the club and see if there are any group buys going on. Lots of retailers (non-chain types) will give you a break on 10 bags, another at 25 and a deep cut at 100 bags. Same thing with powder and wads.

I don't know what current discounts are on quantities around here, the last time I bought shot I bought 100 bags for $10 per bag. Split 3 ways it wasn't too bad....

birddog
January 16, 2006, 09:58 PM
I don't have any sources, since I buy all of my stuff locally. But, cost-wise, in my opinion, it's worth it. I load Win AA hulls which are very common and dirt cheap, Clays powder, which is the same, Win 209 primers and WAA12 wads which are also readily available and inexpensive. My 1 1/8 loads are identical for size 6 pheasant and rabbit loads, size 8 woodcock and clays loads. I don't vary them in the slightest (I've never been a believer in high power loads for pheasant) and once my MEC progressive was set up, I haven't had to change a thing. PM me if you want my load recipe.

Joel

Khornet
January 17, 2006, 10:50 AM
getting the book 'Reloading for Shotgunners' available from many sources. Matching of components, especially hulls and wads, is not all that straightforward.

rocky
January 17, 2006, 11:03 AM
I think long term it's more affordable, if you have the time to reload. Also check out Midway and others for pricing.

Bill Z
January 17, 2006, 12:17 PM
Thanks for the input. I've got enough to get started, but I like to do a lot of reloading while it's cool since my shop's airconditioning doesn't do it justice in our Georgia summers and I need to devote the mornings to customers work.

I don't plan on doing any hunting, so I;m thinking of sticking with 7.5 and a soft load. Enough to break clays and know down plates.

larryw
January 17, 2006, 01:44 PM
When pricing shot, remember that the shipping is significant; if you're able to find it locally, even at a higher per-bag price, it may wind up being less expensive than mail order. You may want to check with the local clubs/clays fields to see if there is a group buy going on that you can get in on. Also, don't be afraid of using recycled shot for clays shooting; provided it is clean and screen sorted, it is just fine and saves you a bunch of money. Since shot cost is the lion's share of the total shell cost, watch this item closely.

As for wads, I've started using Claybuster wads instead of the "factory" ones (Winchester). Quality is outstanding and they will save you a bit of money. http://www.claybusterwads.com/claybuster.html

One source I use for all my reloading is Powder Valley: good prices, sensible shipping policies and great service. http://www.powdervalleyinc.com/

Buying a bunch of supplies up front, if you can get past the initial out of pocket, will save you some money.

The book mentioned above is recommended for the reasons already stated.

45auto
January 17, 2006, 06:08 PM
http://www.trapshooters.com/sreloadcalc.htm

Try the link above for a reloading calculator. Works well.

I'd recommend Clays powder because of the cost and low charge weights. In addition, Hodgdon has a comprehensive list of reloads using many different componants and hulls. Lot's of light loads from 7/8 through 1 1/8 oz.

IMHO, the best hull for longevity is the Remington STS.

scout26
January 17, 2006, 09:06 PM
Yep, we do a bunch of it, me - 12 ga, my daughter (she's 12) - 20 ga.

Buy in bulk, holds down the price per shell. Group buys knock the price way down.

IMO, Duster wads are less expensive and leave a a lots less residue in the barrel then claybuster wads, YMMV.

http://www.dusterwads.com/index-2.html

I try to buy locally to avoid the Haz Mat/shipping costs and to support my local shops, but I've also bought on-line when the deal is there.

Shot is just waaaaayyyy to expensive to ship to do it any way other then to buy locally, unless you literally buy a ton. :D

HSMITH
January 17, 2006, 11:47 PM
Dusters are good wads, better than Claybusters by a bunch. They don't work well in very cold temps though, they split and break when it gets down around freezing.

larryw
January 18, 2006, 03:42 AM
Any recommended online sources for Duster wads?

redneck2
January 18, 2006, 08:28 AM
Ask around at the clubs you shoot at. We've got a guy that takes a rather large 4 wheel trailer to a wholesaler and literally gets tons of shot. Cost is way less than buying one at a time. He has a bunch of guys go together to make it cost effective

I checked into loading for my 10 gauge. Rounds cost the same or more as factory stuff. Gotta buy in bulk to make it worthwhile.

Nobody has said so far, but you have to use EXACT info for each load. You cannot substitute ANYTHING on shot shells like you can for rifle/pistol. Load, wad, hull, primer have to be exact

HSMITH
January 18, 2006, 10:50 AM
Larry, I have never bought them online so I am not much help on that.

PITBULL
January 19, 2006, 05:51 PM
what do you need to make 12 gauge 2 2/3 and 3 in shells.
and how much. and where can you get the stuff i dont know nothing about making ammo. is it cheaper to make than to buy at walmart

Bill Z
January 19, 2006, 06:26 PM
Thanks for the links and info guys. I'm not sure if I'm saving money, but am enjoying the reduced recoil and being able to tailor my shells.

larryw
January 20, 2006, 02:54 PM
Thanks HSMITH.

Pitbull, unless you shoot a lot you're not going to save much money reloading shotgun shells compared to buying at WalMart (100 shell bulk packs are $15). Add to that the initial costs associated with getting started (press, powder, shot, etc) and the learning curve, and the economic benefit is even less. The real savings come into play when a high volume shooter buys the supplies in large quantities (i.e. buys shot by the ton).

I reload because it is a relaxing thing to do, the resulting ammo is better quality, and it allows me to tailor the loads to my liking. I doubt I save much money and I know I havn't paid off the cost of my press yet. If you're interested in looking into this, there are several good books on the subject, or you can take a class from an instructor; check the NRA site for local classes: http://www.nrahq.org/education/training/find.asp . If there isn't a class you want, call the listed instructors and ask them.

PITBULL
January 20, 2006, 04:07 PM
Thanks HSMITH.

Pitbull, unless you shoot a lot you're not going to save much money reloading shotgun shells compared to buying at WalMart (100 shell bulk packs are $15). Add to that the initial costs associated with getting started (press, powder, shot, etc) and the learning curve, and the economic benefit is even less. The real savings come into play when a high volume shooter buys the supplies in large quantities (i.e. buys shot by the ton).

I reload because it is a relaxing thing to do, the resulting ammo is better quality, and it allows me to tailor the loads to my liking. I doubt I save much money and I know I havn't paid off the cost of my press yet. If you're interested in looking into this, there are several good books on the subject, or you can take a class from an instructor; check the NRA site for local classes: http://www.nrahq.org/education/training/find.asp . If there isn't a class you want, call the listed instructors and ask them.
thanks

scout26
January 20, 2006, 07:35 PM
What Larryw said.

I might save a little bit, because I buy in bulk and tailor my loads to me and what I'm going to use that load for. I've got a bunch of different Hunting loads -Pheasant both early and late season, Rabbit, Squrriel, Turkey, etc. Trap loads, Handicap Trap loads, Skeet loads, 5 Stand loads, Sporting Clays loads. (I know it's much easier just to stop buy Wallyworld or the local gun shop and buy a box or flat on the way to the range/field.) But it's a lot more to roll your own.

My 5 year old son refers to it as "Family Fun Night", when we head down to the basement (winter) or out to the garage (summer) to load some shells. He loves picking up hulls at my club. (Although his mother is just appalled, when he knocks over the garbage barrels behind the trap lines and crawls in looking for hulls. :eek: :uhoh: :scrutiny: )

trickyasafox
January 20, 2006, 09:18 PM
any of you guys reload your own slugs?

scout26
January 20, 2006, 09:34 PM
TAAF,

Not yet, I shoot Winchester Platnium's and they work real good for me. (Never had to shoot a deer twice and I've been thinking about doing if just for gits and shiggles, but then I realize I'd have to shoot them, and my shoulder says "Whoa, there let's really think about this."

If I find some spare cash lying around I just might try it. IIRC, I saw a place on-line, that pretty much had everything you need (hulls, slugs, wads) for less then $30-40. Of course, I suffer from CRS, so I don't know the name of the place nor a link. But if you start at www.reload.nrma.com you might be able to find it.

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