The riflescope of the future- It's Digital


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answerguy
January 25, 2006, 04:42 PM
Just saw an ad for this in the NRA's American Rifleman magazine
http://www.elcansportingoptics.com/home.php

DigitalHunter™ by ELCAN Optical Technologies is a riflescope for the 21st century. It is a fully digital sighting system designed to bring the benefits of modern technology to enhance the enjoyment and safety of your hunting experience. Embracing the digital age, DigitalHunter™ bridges the gap to pass along the great hunting tradition. Rugged and easy to use, DigitalHunter™ is a revolution in riflescope technology, departing from the obsolete glass-and-metal riflescopes of yesteryear and bringing today's serious hunters enabling benefits only offered by modern technology.

http://www.elcansportingoptics.com/images/mainmain.jpg

I wouldn't call it terribly attractive but maybe it's just because it's different.

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BulletFan
January 25, 2006, 04:50 PM
This seems like a pretty novel idea, however I don't see this product ever catching on to the level of popularity as perhaps the traditional 3-9X40mm "metal and glass." I think this will probably sell enough to pay for the marketing, manufacturing, distribution and service of this piece, but I don't see it sticking around for another year of perhaps a "Generation II" model. I could be all wrong and have no clue what i'm talking about, but I'd be willing to bet, this thing won't be around next year.

My .02
Matt

waterhouse
January 25, 2006, 04:51 PM
Interesting, but I won't be throwing out my "obsolete glass-and-metal riflescopes of yesteryear" any time soon.

Henry Bowman
January 25, 2006, 04:53 PM
Can you program in your "range card" for your load so that it automatically calculates bullet drop at the measured range and adjusts the reticule? Just add windage and...:cool:

Dave R
January 25, 2006, 04:57 PM
If it could do that, AND if it includes a laser rangefinder, so it automatically adjusts the reticle for distance at that drop, THEN it would be cool.

answerguy
January 25, 2006, 04:57 PM
This seems like a pretty novel idea, however I don't see this product ever catching on to the level of popularity as perhaps the traditional 3-9X40mm "metal and glass." I think this will probably sell enough to pay for the marketing, manufacturing, distribution and service of this piece, but I don't see it sticking around for another year of perhaps a "Generation II" model. I could be all wrong and have no clue what i'm talking about, but I'd be willing to bet, this thing won't be around next year.

My .02
Matt

Maybe so, us hunter types are a stubborn lot. But some old line camera manufacturers have stopped making traditional film cameras, replacing them with a digital line. Maybe we'll see the day when glass and metal scopes aren't sold either.

BulletFan
January 25, 2006, 04:59 PM
Two words,
and one of them is "ugly"
:barf:

Henry Bowman
January 25, 2006, 04:59 PM
It appears to NOT have a built in rangefinder. I will check it out at SHOT Show and report back to you.

waterhouse
January 25, 2006, 05:00 PM
Henry, from the product literature, it appears that you can enter your bullet data into the scope. The scope doesn't have a laser range finder, so before the shot, you then type in the "estimated range" and it adjusts your elevation for you.

If I'm estimating the range anyway, I might as well spin the knob and count the clicks.


If this turns out to be a hit, new models could have a built in rangefinder and wind gauge and do everything for you. Theoretically at least.

RaetherEnt
January 25, 2006, 05:03 PM
I saw something like this the other day on OLN...I think it was a new military design by either FN or HK. The scope has a built in range finder, first you digitally range the target, then the scope notifies you when you have raised or lowered the crown of the barrel high or low enough for the shot at the distance.

BulletFan
January 25, 2006, 05:05 PM
Maybe so, us hunter types are a stubborn lot. But some old line camera manufacturers have stopped making traditional film cameras, replacing them with a digital line. Maybe we'll see the day when glass and metal scopes aren't sold either.

I don't think the big names like Canon, Nikon, Olympus, Fujifilm, and maybe even Mavica will EVER completely stop making film cameras. Digital is great, don't get me wrong, I'm well in tune with the advances in digital technology (cameras specifically) but digital will never surpass analog in terms of quality. you can have a 22 megapixel camera and IMHO will never look better than a medium format Mavica shooting with good hookups.
High quality optics + high quality construction + the human eye = bullseye
high quality optics + CCD = a product with capabilities limited to the CCD

nbkky71
January 25, 2006, 05:06 PM
They're be mainstream someday...

Even the US Navy's Virginia-class subs use a digital imaging mast instead of the old periscope.

Tag
January 25, 2006, 05:07 PM
I like the idea, not so much the batteries.

Once Leupold or Zeiss come out w/ an all digital model I'd think about giving one a try.

answerguy
January 25, 2006, 05:27 PM
A couple of thoughts, they designed it to (kinda) look like a traditional scope but they didn't have to. They could offset the sight or even detach it so you could wear it like an eyeglass.

Coltdriver
January 25, 2006, 05:30 PM
This is pretty cool but......

When a top notch scope maker like Leupold comes out with a scope with a built in rangefinder that I can also enter the ballistics for my rifle/round into so that the recticle auto centers, I am buying one.

Till then I'm buying conventional stuff.

answerguy
January 25, 2006, 05:33 PM
Price tag: about 2 grand.

http://www.rifleshootermag.com/gun_accessories/sights_092105/index2.html

benEzra
January 25, 2006, 05:42 PM
It's currently kind of big, but the first laser sights were big also. Now they're tiny.

I like the concept.

mattf7184
January 25, 2006, 05:45 PM
I always like to see new technology being tried with anything. There are many possible advantages with a system like this. I think the future will hold more digital scopes.

Manedwolf
January 25, 2006, 06:42 PM
Maybe so, us hunter types are a stubborn lot. But some old line camera manufacturers have stopped making traditional film cameras, replacing them with a digital line. Maybe we'll see the day when glass and metal scopes aren't sold either.

But you'll never depend on a camera for food or defense against hostile wildlife in a bad situation.

And a metal and glass scope will never run out of batteries or say "ERROR".

Zak Smith
January 25, 2006, 07:02 PM
Some other issues with non-passthrough optics:

1. dynamic range of image (both sensor and LCD)
2. response time / refresh rate
3. very close focus distance from eye compared to regular optics

answerguy
January 25, 2006, 07:42 PM
But you'll never depend on a camera for food or defense against hostile wildlife in a bad situation.

And a metal and glass scope will never run out of batteries or say "ERROR".

Glass scopes have a failure rate too. If they can keep the failure rate of these new ones at the same level that should be acceptable. I do wonder how well they hold up to the recoil of a magnum rifle.

ajkurp
January 25, 2006, 08:44 PM
I played with one like this at last year's SHOT show. In addition to large size and being dependent on batteries, the biggest drawback is poor resolution at higher magnification.

Because it is CCD based, just as in your digital camera the image becomes pixelated at higher mag.

MikeJackmin
January 25, 2006, 09:03 PM
I like new things. I like old things, too. Both is good.

I see some real potential for this technology. I want a snapshot at the instant the gun fires, so I can see exactly where I was aiming. (I want the option to get that snapshot while dry-firing, too - what a wonderful training aid!) I want a bullet drop compensator that I can calibrate with the actual results from my rifle and load. I want to be able to draw my own reticules on my computer and upload them to the scope. Heck, why not add a wireless link and have a second, remote display? That's the kind of thing that can make target shooting a lot more of a spectator sport.

It'd be fun to save movies of successful shots, too. Integrate some range, wind, and mirage sensors and you'd have a whole new game.

(I'd bet that two lasers, of different wavelengths, would bend differently under mirage conditions and could be used to measure the distortion. That'd really be something).

DigMe
January 26, 2006, 12:32 AM
I played with one like this at last year's SHOT show. In addition to large size and being dependent on batteries, the biggest drawback is poor resolution at higher magnification.

Because it is CCD based, just as in your digital camera the image becomes pixelated at higher mag.


That's what I was about to say. If it relies entirely on digital zoom without optics then I wouldn't touch it with a ten foot pole at this point in digital zoom technology.

brad cook

rero360
January 26, 2006, 01:20 AM
I like new things. I like old things, too. Both is good.

I see some real potential for this technology. I want a snapshot at the instant the gun fires, so I can see exactly where I was aiming. (I want the option to get that snapshot while dry-firing, too - what a wonderful training aid!) I want a bullet drop compensator that I can calibrate with the actual results from my rifle and load. I want to be able to draw my own reticules on my computer and upload them to the scope. Heck, why not add a wireless link and have a second, remote display? That's the kind of thing that can make target shooting a lot more of a spectator sport.

It'd be fun to save movies of successful shots, too. Integrate some range, wind, and mirage sensors and you'd have a whole new game.

(I'd bet that two lasers, of different wavelengths, would bend differently under mirage conditions and could be used to measure the distortion. That'd really be something).


I think you got something there, with the lasers at different wavelengths, I do believe that would work, I don't know mch about lasers, just what I've read in Scientific American, but it should work.


I've had the idea of a scope that you put you rifle and load data into it and it automatically adjusts to poi, but also have it so it has a aimpoint and a circle around that in which would show where your round would likely to hit according to your load's patterning. sorry about the spelling, never a strong point.

Telperion
January 26, 2006, 01:36 AM
I think they would do better to develop this kind of tech for the tactical crowd. Something truly amazing (and several years off) would be a combination digital day/night/thermal scope with automatic rangefinding and onboard machine vision algorithms to aid with target ID and even windage calculations. Build it into a AGOG-sized package and sell them by the truckload to the militree. :)

LAK
January 27, 2006, 08:30 AM
I wonder how good they are after exposure to a season or two being heated in the desert sun, and frozen in subzero temperatures. Even conventional scopes have a hard time with extremes and in between, mositure, vibration and shock. Probably "neat" when new, inside warranty, and the batteries work/can be found. But I would not want to rely on their longivity.
--------------------------------------------

http://ussliberty.org
http://ssunitedstates.org

Medusa
January 27, 2006, 04:43 PM
Wasn't something like it (integrated rangefinder, nightvision, calculates drop and adjusts the cross) concieved for OICW program? FN has also something like it for F2000 AR, Fire Control Computer as they called it.

For some others, I've noticed that Meopta has a digital scope - Meosmart that does record the snap-shot of firing. http://www.meopta.com/index.php?id=132&lang=en
Meosmart™, A Meopta exclusive digital Hunting Scope
A truly innovative and revolutionary new firearms optical sighting product for the 21st century!
http://www.meopta.com/data/products/sport-optics/smartscope.jpg
When set in the on position, the Meosmart™ automatically captures a digital image of what ever the scope is aimed at when the firearm is discharged or when the manual shutter button is pressed. Allowing the user to capture an image of his intended target that can later be reviewed, saved, printed or shared.
This revolutionary new product utilizes only the finest optical image splitting system available in addition to state-of-the-art electronics, firmware and CCD digital image hardware, which have been seamlessly blended into our renowned top quality Meostar™ riflescope system! Ensuring superior sighting performance and years of quality image capturing! Because of its unique image splitting configuration the optical sighting system is designed to function when the digital capturing system is in either the on or off positions, guarantying that you will never miss a shooting opportunity due to any aspect of the digital capturing system.
http://www.meopta.com/data/products/sport-optics/smartscope-detail2.jpg
The Meosmart™ is ideally suited for serious hunters who want to capture that once in a lifetime shot or the professional target shooters who are always looking for ways to improve their shooting technique or just the average shooter who has to have the most innovative and revolutionary riflescope on the market today!

f4t9r
January 27, 2006, 04:44 PM
thats wild , what will they come up with next ?????

Molon Labe
January 31, 2006, 10:20 AM
Operating Time: > 4 Hours at 77 °F (25 °C)
Power Source: 4 AA Lithium Batteries

Um, no thanks. :rolleyes:

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