Factory standard sights Glock 21


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kent m. lane
January 31, 2006, 07:33 AM
I just bought a g-21. I went to the range and had a heck of a time with the factory sights, they are hard to get on target quick and then when I on target [the target was white and red center] anyway my eyes are drifting and going in and out of focus on the sights. Can anyone recoment a good quality aftermarket sight front and rear for this autoloader? Night sights are also ok although I want the best if it comes to night sights. Any recomendations would greatly be a savior to my problem with Glock stock sights.


Thanks to all, Kent

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Don of Kalifornia
January 31, 2006, 10:41 AM
Try a set of melpros..I have a set on all three of my glocks, including my g21

middy
January 31, 2006, 01:38 PM
I hate the white outline on the rear sight. The only modification I make to a Glock is a steel front sight post (with white dot), then I turn the rear sight around backwards so it is solid black.

PO2Hammer
January 31, 2006, 04:07 PM
I put a set of Heinie sights on my G-21. Mine are night sights, but they make black serrated sights as well.
The Heinie front is a little narrower than stock and they are crisp and clear machined blue steel.
Now I can keep all my shots on a paper plate at 25 yards.
http://www.heinie.com/318big.php

Pistol Toter
January 31, 2006, 06:24 PM
Kent, I have Mepro's on my G21 too. They are the first night sights I have ever had and I absolutely think they are better than pockets on shirts and sliced bread, they're GREAT. However, It sounds like to me that you may need your eyes looked at or perhaps you are trying to focus on he rear sight, the front sight and the target at the same time. Concentrate your focus on the front sight and let the rear and the target go shightly out of focus. Start out by looking at the target raise the gun to find the front sight in the rear notch and then transfer the focus to the front sight. If when you raise the gun to find the sights lined up; if the sights do not line up you have a grip problem. The gun must naturaly point, for me, some do, some don't and if they don't I can't hit the broad side of a barn at two steps. If it takes more than a second or two for me to get the first shot off there is something wrong. The gun is not a seperate entity but an extension of my hand and arm, it's like pointing your finger thereby making sighting an almost unrequired or natural act. If you are coming down on the target you can not see the target because the gun is in the line of sight. Practice this: place two doits on a piece of paper five or six inches apart, place the pencil on the first dot then look at the second dot and without moving your eyes draw the line. I almost garentee you that the line will be so straight that you can lay a ruler down and it will line right up but if you look back at the first dot or let your vision wonder the line will be wavy. For me shooting a gun is the same way. I hope this helps and is not a smart ass answer. I have taught a number of people this line of reasoning and they are amazed at the change. It ranks right up there with trigger and breath control. When you get it all together you can't help but see the difference. Speed quickly follows. Regards P.T.

kent m. lane
January 31, 2006, 09:35 PM
Kent, I have Mepro's on my G21 too. They are the first night sights I have ever had and I absolutely think they are better than pockets on shirts and sliced bread, they're GREAT. However, It sounds like to me that you may need your eyes looked at or perhaps you are trying to focus on he rear sight, the front sight and the target at the same time. Concentrate your focus on the front sight and let the rear and the target go shightly out of focus. Start out by looking at the target raise the gun to find the front sight in the rear notch and then transfer the focus to the front sight. If when you raise the gun to find the sights lined up; if the sights do not line up you have a grip problem. The gun must naturaly point, for me, some do, some don't and if they don't I can't hit the broad side of a barn at two steps. If it takes more than a second or two for me to get the first shot off there is something wrong. The gun is not a seperate entity but an extension of my hand and arm, it's like pointing your finger thereby making sighting an almost unrequired or natural act. If you are coming down on the target you can not see the target because the gun is in the line of sight. Practice this: place two doits on a piece of paper five or six inches apart, place the pencil on the first dot then look at the second dot and without moving your eyes draw the line. I almost garentee you that the line will be so straight that you can lay a ruler down and it will line right up but if you look back at the first dot or let your vision wonder the line will be wavy. For me shooting a gun is the same way. I hope this helps and is not a smart ass answer. I have taught a number of people this line of reasoning and they are amazed at the change. It ranks right up there with trigger and breath control. When you get it all together you can't help but see the difference. Speed quickly follows. Regards P.T.

kent m. lane
January 31, 2006, 09:37 PM
I hate the white outline on the rear sight. The only modification I make to a Glock is a steel front sight post (with white dot), then I turn the rear sight around backwards so it is solid black.


Very good idea! Thanks alot. Kent

kent m. lane
January 31, 2006, 09:39 PM
Also this makes alot of sense thank you with black sights with no white lines I do fine I will do all you recomended. tyhank you again. Kent

Rockstar
February 1, 2006, 11:45 AM
IF you can focus on the rear sight, front sight, and target, all at the same time, then you should donate your eyeballs to the Smithsonian. ;)

Pistol Toter
February 1, 2006, 12:30 PM
Rockstar, that was the point I was trying to make. It is not possible to focus but on one point at a time, everyting else is at somepoint of out of focus; as in a camera the focal length of a lens has much to do with the apperture of the lens and the clarity of the lens hence the peep sight. While the human eye does some better it is still the same principle. Either the gentleman is having some vision problems or he needs someone to help him with a skill that for most non-shooters is somewhat difficult to understand. This forum is not really the place for that type of coaching but on the range where someone like you, I and others here can help him sort out his problem. The drawing of the line from point to point is an exercise to get one to understand that you must be looking at one point at a time but in relation to the overall picture. A line is the connecting of a lot of point on that line. You got to think outside of the box while still standing inside the dad-blame thing. P.T.

kent m. lane
February 1, 2006, 02:27 PM
IF you can focus on the rear sight, front sight, and target, all at the same time, then you should donate your eyeballs to the Smithsonian. ;) What I mean is the rear white outline on the rear sight is distracting, like a fly landing on your nose while trying to knock off a shot.;)

kent m. lane
February 1, 2006, 02:31 PM
I put a set of Heinie sights on my G-21. Mine are night sights, but they make black serrated sights as well.
The Heinie front is a little narrower than stock and they are crisp and clear machined blue steel.
Now I can keep all my shots on a paper plate at 25 yards.
http://www.heinie.com/318big.php Just what the doctor orderd. These are what I need, and will order right now. Thanks alot. Kent

Rockstar
February 2, 2006, 10:53 AM
Rockstar, that was the point I was trying to make. It is not possible to focus but on one point at a time, everyting else is at somepoint of out of focus; as in a camera the focal length of a lens has much to do with the apperture of the lens and the clarity of the lens hence the peep sight. While the human eye does some better it is still the same principle. Either the gentleman is having some vision problems or he needs someone to help him with a skill that for most non-shooters is somewhat difficult to understand. This forum is not really the place for that type of coaching but on the range where someone like you, I and others here can help him sort out his problem. The drawing of the line from point to point is an exercise to get one to understand that you must be looking at one point at a time but in relation to the overall picture. A line is the connecting of a lot of point on that line. You got to think outside of the box while still standing inside the dad-blame thing. P.T.

Yeah, if he could fix his eyeballs' apertures @ f22, he'd probably have everything in focus; however, everything would also look pretty dark, unless he could shift his retinas to ISO 3200! :D I don't believe there's anything wrong that a few thousand rounds downrange won't cure. Having said that, I despise Glocks' factory sights. I use steel sights on all my Glocks. Those of us who actually understand what "sight picture" means also ignore dots, lines, etc., and acquire a sight picture appropriate for the loads and ranges at which we're shooting. ;)

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