scope sighting


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PITBULL
February 6, 2006, 06:07 PM
I got a marlin model 60. and put a tasco 3x9x40 with see tru rings on it. and need to know how many yard's to sight it in at?

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Highland Ranger
February 6, 2006, 06:21 PM
Depends on what you use it for . . .

Guyon
February 6, 2006, 06:47 PM
I got a marlin model 60. and put a tasco 3x9x40 with see tru rings on it. and need to know how many yard's to sight it in at?Sight it in to hit dead on at 300. You'll need a big shim.

Guyon
February 7, 2006, 04:31 PM
I assumed the initial post was a joke.

If not, that's a heckuva lot of magnification for a little bit of gun. :D

LHB1
February 7, 2006, 05:55 PM
Pitbull,
First, dump the see thru rings and mount your scope using std rings. The see thru rings cause you to lift your head higher than necessary to see thru the scope. They increase difficulty of using scope and if you are going to use the scope, you won't be needing the iron sights. Use one or the other but don't try to mix them, IMHO.
After that, you might try sighting the .22 LR at 50 yds depending on intended use. You will probably have a little parallax because most 3x9 scopes of that size are intended for high power rifles and parallax is usually set for about 150 yds. As long as you put your head in the same place on rifle stock and look thru center of scope, parallax will NOT have any effect. (See FAQ section on Leupold website for more info on parallax.)

Good shooting and be safe.
LB

mustanger98
February 7, 2006, 06:06 PM
I won't comment on the rings/bases, but I like using 3-9X40 on pretty much anything as it's easier to see through than those dinky little "rimfire" scopes. I've had good results sighted in at 50yds and 100yds on a square range. However, in real life, I think it won't do anything I wouldn't do with with the stock irons.

Sight it in to hit dead on at 300. You'll need a big shim.

I assumed this was a joke, but knowing what I know about .22LR, it's not totally out of the question. The real problem is the mid-range trajectory.:D

g56
February 7, 2006, 06:30 PM
22 rimfires are normally sighted in at 50 yards.

PITBULL
February 7, 2006, 10:00 PM
thanks for the help. i sighted it in at 50 yards and can hit a 20 gauge shotgun case at 50 yards. and can knock over a 2 litter botle filled with water at a 100 yards is that good?

mustanger98
February 7, 2006, 10:35 PM
22 rimfires are normally sighted in at 50 yards.

Ummm... sight-in distance may or may not be mission specific. Squirrel hunting, you only need to hit close in... maybe 25'. Smallbore rifle sillouette, you have to know the settings for 44m, and three more distances (usually metric) out to 100m. If the rifle were dedicated BR 50-50 (benchrest, 50rds for score at 50yds), then yeah, 50yd sight-in.

i sighted it in at 50 yards and can hit a 20 gauge shotgun case at 50 yards. and can knock over a 2 litter botle filled with water at a 100 yards is that good?

I'd say that's doing pretty good. Offhand or across the bench?

BTW, the scope don't help the size of your groups. The scope just gives you a better look at your target. Control of breathing, sight alignment, and trigger control on a good rifle do more for you group size.

PITBULL
February 8, 2006, 01:10 AM
Ummm... sight-in distance may or may not be mission specific. Squirrel hunting, you only need to hit close in... maybe 25'. Smallbore rifle sillouette, you have to know the settings for 44m, and three more distances (usually metric) out to 100m. If the rifle were dedicated BR 50-50 (benchrest, 50rds for score at 50yds), then yeah, 50yd sight-in.



I'd say that's doing pretty good. Offhand or across the bench?

BTW, the scope don't help the size of your groups. The scope just gives you a better look at your target. Control of breathing, sight alignment, and trigger control on a good rifle do more for you group size.
across a table with a pillow under the gun. don't i need to hold my breath when i shoot? im new to rifle shooting.

R.O.F
February 8, 2006, 01:34 AM
+1 on LBH's post. Standard rings are adequate when shooting rimfires. If it were an issue, then you might as well not use a scope. Iron Sights are great, but you don't need em as back-up when shooting .22s. IMHO.

+100 on Mustangers post.
Breathing control is the most important part of shooting. I kinda threw that info at a couple deer hunters I know and they came back thanking me for it. Breath in...hold it...find your sight....shoot...release. It works wonders, just don't tell a forum or anything, everyone will be an expert then.

Get yourself whatever fits your needs and something that you like, a lot of people will tell you to spend upwards of $1000 on any given scope, plus or minus on a rimfire scope, (I've seen it!!!). .22s oughtta be fun, keep 'em that way.

PITBULL
February 8, 2006, 01:40 AM
+1 on LBH's post. Standard rings are adequate when shooting rimfires. If it were an issue, then you might as well not use a scope. Iron Sights are great, but you don't need em as back-up when shooting .22s. IMHO.

+100 on Mustangers post.
Breathing control is the most important part of shooting. I kinda threw that info at a couple deer hunters I know and they came back thanking me for it. Breath in...hold it...find your sight....shoot...release. It works wonders, just don't tell a forum or anything, everyone will be an expert then.

Get yourself whatever fits your needs and something that you like, a lot of people will tell you to spend upwards of $1000 on any given scope, plus or minus on a rimfire scope, (I've seen it!!!). .22s oughtta be fun, keep 'em that way.
thanks for the help on breathing. but im going to keep the see thru ring's.

MCgunner
February 8, 2006, 09:21 AM
I've always sighted my guns in at 25 yards and held a little high at 50. All I ever cared about shooting .22s for was squirrel hunting and plinking.

That see through mount is going to do weird stuff to your tragectory, very high sight.

foghornl
February 8, 2006, 10:16 AM
I put a Tasco 3-7x21 (or whatever the size of those dinky rimfire scopes was in 1968 or so) on my Nylon66 I had as a teen, and found it was no real improvement over the irons. (I had lost the front sight of my Nylon 66, and a replacement sight & the 2 screws from Remmy was more than the scope/tip-off mount)

Later, when I had a few more bucks, I swapped to a fixed power 4x30 or x32, don't remember, [another Tasco] but not a so-called 'rimfire' scope. WOW! HUGE difference.

BTW, I also like 'Big Glass' on my rifles. My Mossberg ATR-100 in .30-06 wears a Simmons 3-9x50. That objective lens is about 1/4" above the barrel, sitting in the tallest 'high-rise' rings I could find.

If you can consistantly hit a 20-ga hull @50Yards, that's good shootin' for a basic .22 rimfire rifle.

Guyon
February 8, 2006, 10:17 AM
If the 3-9x40 floats your boat, then power to ya'. A decent 4x fixed is about the biggest scope I'd put on a .22 though.

I don't think there's anything wrong with a compact rimfire scope, as long as the glass is good. Generally, a 100 yard shot with a .22 is a pretty long shot.

I agree with others here, however, that you'd be better served with some standard rings.

BTW, I also like 'Big Glass' on my rifles. My Mossberg ATR-100 in .30-06 wears a Simmons 3-9x50. That objective lens is about 1/4" above the barrel, sitting in the tallest 'high-rise' rings I could find.foghornl, what do you see as the advantage of the 50mm? I've tried to explain to a friend that a 3-9X40 set at 4x or 5x already transmits more light than the human eye can take in. It's really all about glass quality and coatings once you reach a certain point of exit pupil.

If you like the big 50mm scopes, you seen these yet? http://www.leupold.com/products/vx-l/main.html

Lupinus
February 8, 2006, 03:09 PM
the only reason I like see through rings is because I shoot at the range and like to switch between the two without having to take the scope off all the time to use the iron.

For just hunting though I would likly ditch the see throughs in favor of standard rings.

PITBULL
February 8, 2006, 03:24 PM
when i shoot my marlin model 60 the scope mount's slide back and they are on good. so how could i fix this?

Guyon
February 8, 2006, 04:21 PM
First, make sure you have the proper mounts.

If so, try snugging down your screws with just a dab of purple (gun) loctite on the threads.

Lupinus
February 8, 2006, 04:50 PM
when i shoot my marlin model 60 the scope mount's slide back and they are on good. so how could i fix this?
we aren't talking high recoil here. make sure it is the right mounts and that you have them set in the grooves properly

PITBULL
February 8, 2006, 05:18 PM
First, make sure you have the proper mounts.

If so, try snugging down your screws with just a dab of purple (gun) loctite on the threads.
Yeah the screw's on the mount's are not staying tight.

what does that purple gun loctite stuff do?
and where can i get it?
and can i get the mount's off if i use the purple stuff?

LHB1
February 8, 2006, 05:26 PM
Pitbull,
No offense but what kind of mounts are you using? Some of the $4.95 cheapie mounts are real junk and may not hold a scope that heavy without stripping threads. You may need a better quality mount. Again, IMO, toss the see thru's and go with std mounts. Good luck.

Good shooting and be safe.
LB

Lupinus
February 8, 2006, 05:28 PM
what does that purple gun loctite stuff do?
and where can i get it?
and can i get the mount's off if i use the purple stuff?
Lock tight you can get most anyhere. Bascly what it does is keep the screws from vibrating loose. And yes you can get them off just will be harder.

PITBULL
February 8, 2006, 05:41 PM
Pitbull,
No offense but what kind of mounts are you using? Some of the $4.95 cheapie mounts are real junk and may not hold a scope that heavy without stripping threads. You may need a better quality mount. Again, IMO, toss the see thru's and go with std mounts. Good luck.

Good shooting and be safe.
LB
the mount's are weaver 1 in see-thru scope mount's for 3/8" grooved receivers

LHB1
February 8, 2006, 06:01 PM
Weaver mounts are generally serviceable and I would have expected them to be sturdy enough to hold the scope. You might try degreasing the grooves in receiver and clamp areas on mounts to help eliminate slippage. Another thought: are you built like the Calif governor and perhaps over tightened/stripped the screws? Using Loctite or a replacement mount are options. Good luck.

Good shooting and be safe.
LB

PITBULL
February 8, 2006, 06:27 PM
thanks can i get loc tite 222 at walmart

Vern Humphrey
February 8, 2006, 06:49 PM
I like to sight a .22 in at 50 feet. This puts you a tad high at 25 and 50 yards, and dead on at 75 yards. Most squirrel hunting is right around 50 feet, give or take, so this is ideal, and with practice, you can take shots well out to 100 yards (when the leaves are off the trees.)

I'll second the recommendation for a 4X scope -- a good quality 4X designed for a .22 (with parallax set for a .22.) Mine is a Burris mini 4X.

I'd also recommend quality mounts. Degrease everything -- receiver grooves, mount, screws and rings and mount. If you get slippage then, go the loctite route.

bowfin
February 8, 2006, 07:09 PM
I too, am not a big fan of see thru scope rings, but I guess if a guy had a lace on cheek pad that raised the head high enough, that might let a guy use a scope mounted on see thru rings without stretching his neck like an ostrich.

I don't know if they make a quick detachable mount that rezeros for .22s, that would be better yet.

I am not a big iron sight fan, so don't expect me to take any of my own suggestions, I'll live and die with a low mounted scope for hunting.

mustanger98
February 8, 2006, 08:23 PM
PITBULL:across a table with a pillow under the gun. don't i need to hold my breath when i shoot? im new to rifle shooting.

R.O.F:
+100 on Mustangers post.
Breathing control is the most important part of shooting. I kinda threw that info at a couple deer hunters I know and they came back thanking me for it. Breath in...hold it...find your sight....shoot...release. It works wonders, just don't tell a forum or anything, everyone will be an expert then.

Sounds like good shooting, but for benchresting, I'd recommend getting yourself a good sandbag. If you fill that sandbag with either sand, corncob madia, or shot, it'll sit firmer than a pillow.

On breathing control, and this is just my take on it... I like to breath deep a few times, then let out half a breath and hold it. Then find your sight, relax and start your trigger squeeze. Just wait for the shot to break. Don't anticipate it. Just relax and don't rush the shot.

FWIW, on the see-through mounts, I have a set of Weaver type on my Savage M11GL in .243Winchester. They work real well for me because I don't have to fight my stiff neck to get my eyes down on the sight plane. Therefore, I'm able to relax with it.

I recommend sighting in for whatever distance you like... I recall you said a Coke can at 50yds and a 2liter at 100yds and that sounds pretty good... and then shoot it at 25yds, 75yds, and any other distance you can think of. Try it out to 200yds too for that matter. What do you have to lose? There's a club out in southern California I read about once... they shoot .22LR's out to 400yds just because they can.

Farnham
February 8, 2006, 09:57 PM
Breath in...hold it...find your sight....shoot...release.

Point of order, yer'onner.

There is a point between exhalation and inhalation, called the respiratory pause. At this point, your chest and shoulders and arms are supported by bone (see also: bone support, a VERY important part of marksmanship), not air. Your chest is not expanded, you're relaxed, and most importantly, you are not straining to hold your breath, line up the sights, and squeeze the trigger.

When you find your "natural point of aim" (the position in which you are required to lay, sit, kneel, or stand, to have the sights in the black), the natural alignment of fuzzy rear sight, crisp front sight, and fuzzy target into one lovely picture, and the respiratory pause will coincide with the break of the trigger.

You will then have achieved the Zen of the longarm, grasshoppa...;)

Get off the pillow, get on the ground.

S/F

Farnham

mustanger98
February 8, 2006, 11:05 PM
When you find your "natural point of aim" (the position in which you are required to lay, sit, kneel, or stand, to have the sights in the black), the natural alignment of fuzzy rear sight, crisp front sight, and fuzzy target into one lovely picture, and the respiratory pause will coincide with the break of the trigger.

Being a fan of apertures, I really agree with that. And that's my favorite sight picture. I shoot with a group of guys who shoot service rifles as well as buffalo rifles and scoped .22caliber sillouette rifles. What's crazy though is when you get a guy who shoots a rifle with an aperture on the front end too. I know a guy who does and he hits as good as the guys who shoot post fronts.

This comment though...
Get off the pillow, get on the ground.

In a lot of cases, I'd consider it good advise as far as a steady position goes. However, when we don't know the physical capabilities of the individuals we're talking with, it may not be the best advise. I know a lot of guys trained to shoot from those four positions in the military and I'm not saying those four positions are wrong by any means, but in my position, I have to say they're not the only way. Now, I don't know about PITBULL, but in my own case, I shoot across the bench and from standing or from sitting as I would sit in the deer blind without a rest. I do this because I'm disabled and physically unable to shoot from other positions. When you learn how to shoot from standing with a proper stance, it may not be as steady as from prone, but it can work amazingly well compared to "snap" shooting from standing.

Like I said, I shoot with some guys who shoot apertures and also shoot smallbore sillouette, although not necessarily in the same matches. So, something I learned is how to use the sillouette stance to my advantage which means you learn how to use skeletal support and breathing to a bigger advantage from standing. I hate to get confusing trying to explain the stance on here, so I seriously recommend getting with some sillouette shooters and learning that game. It'll also help you get to know your rifle better.

xmaster
February 8, 2006, 11:06 PM
I once killed a crow at 90 yards with a 22 short. I take a deep breath, blow out about half, sight, squeeze......dead.;)


X

Guyon
February 9, 2006, 07:01 AM
PITBULL, note that there are grades of loctite.

The red stuff, IIRC, is industrial strength and damned hard, if not impossible, to break loose without some heat from a torch.

The blue, I believe, is medium.

The purple stuff, sold for guns, is probably even less binding than the blue, but it does the trick on gun scopes. I've also heard of using clear fingernail polish on the screw threads.

Someone else back me up on these color distinctions???

xjmox14x
February 12, 2006, 06:30 PM
"+100 on Mustangers post.
Breathing control is the most important part of shooting. I kinda threw that info at a couple deer hunters I know and they came back thanking me for it. Breath in...hold it...find your sight....shoot...release. It works wonders, just don't tell a forum or anything, everyone will be an expert then. "

Actually, it is better to fire on the exhale. If you hold your breath you are contracting you muscles causing you to shake slightly. When exhaling, your muscles are completely relaxed and you'll notice the crosshairs don't move at all.

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