How do I take care of my new rifle?


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kosmo
February 8, 2006, 05:17 PM
I have purchased a new CZ-452 training model. This is the first rifle I have owned, so I have a few questions.

1) How do I clean it? I understand, that it is very important not to mess with the exit end of the barell (or whatever the right term is). However, while cleaning my .357 revolver I cannot keep the cleaning rod from toughing the barell. What do I do to prevent this? Put the rifle in a vice or something?

2) Is there a certain "break-in" procedure that I should follow? Should I clean it before firing for the first time?

3) How often should I clean it? How many rounds between cleanings?

Sorry, these may be dumb questions, but I am a newbie.

Thank you.

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ocabj
February 8, 2006, 05:28 PM
This is a .22LR? As far as barrel cleaning on a rimfire, less is more. Most people rarely clean a rimfire bore. If they ever do, they never use brushes.

No breaking in period for a rimfire. Just buy lots of ammo and shoot it.

TheEgg
February 8, 2006, 05:34 PM
I don't know if it is the right thing to do, but I have had good luck for years with just a pull through on .22's. Long time ago, we used home made ones (a knotted string!) to pull a patch through, now you can get Bore Snakes or other brands. I don't use cleaning rods of any kind on my .22s.

This has always worked well for me.

Chawbaccer
February 8, 2006, 06:00 PM
The answer to one of your questions is to use a bore guide, kinda like a funnel for the muzzle that keeps the rod away from the bore. Or you can use a pull thru like a bore snake.

Thefabulousfink
February 8, 2006, 06:25 PM
+1 on boresnake

As far as cleaning, some people clean .22s after every trip to the range, some clean once a year, it's really up to you how clean your rifle is. Most .22s will work just fine if they are a little dirty, but having a dirty rifle doesn't sit right with some people. As said above, boresnakes work great, and will clean out the barrel as good as anything. If you want to use a cleaning rod, patches and powder solvent is all you need (unless you only clean once a year, then use a brush:what: ). You can buy fancy rifle cleaning stand, or just set in on the table, your knees, the ground, etc.

You can clean a rifle from either end, but most people clean from the back in order to keep from having the barrel pointed right at you. On bolt action rifles, remove the bolt and you should have a clear shot with the cleaning rod all the way through the barrel (this also keeps the rod from damaging the muzzle).

Clean all metal parts of your rifle as you would a handgun and lubricate with oil or grease. Be carful not to leave excess oil or solvent on the wood as it can cause it to swell or discolor. Your stock should hold up for a long time so don't worry about cleaning it other than wipping it clean (use mineral spirits on sticky stuff).

I hope you have fun with your new rifle; again, clean it as often as you see fit and what I described is a thurough cleaning.

Tylden
February 8, 2006, 09:11 PM
Congrats on the new CZ 452 ! Great guns...I have two CZ rimfires (Ultra Lux SE and Scout), and also a 527FS chambered in .223......oh yeah, and a CZ PO1 9mm. On cleaning your new CZ....either use a patchworm or a .17 or .20 rod with a bore guide. I know it sounds crazy, but a .22 cleaning rod will NOT fit the bore in the CZ rimfires, the tolerances are just too tight. I've found the initial cleaning of the CZ's to be rather tough, but well worth the effort.
If you want to break it in right, check with the folks on the rimfire central forum (in the CZ section)...there is a recommended method to breaking in the barrel properly. I can't remember off hand what the sequence is (it's been awhile since I broke in a new one).

The Real Hawkeye
February 8, 2006, 09:24 PM
This is a .22LR? As far as barrel cleaning on a rimfire, less is more. Most people rarely clean a rimfire bore. If they ever do, they never use brushes.

No breaking in period for a rimfire. Just buy lots of ammo and shoot it.That is what I would have said. I.e., never clean a .22 LR bore. Not needed.

I will add, though, that it really warms my heart to hear that someone who bought his first rifle wants to know how to take good care of it. A man after my own heart. Just wipe it down with an oiy rag after handling it. Wipe as much crud as you can out of the action (solvent, Q-Tips, tooth brush), and apply a little oil from time to time to the moving contacting parts.

Lupinus
February 8, 2006, 09:37 PM
I guess I am a minority in that everytime I come home from the range my rifle gets a good cleaning. I run a few patchs down the barrel till it comes out clean, and I also clean the bore and other things, basicly I clean most all of it.

I have been thinking though of just shooting and other then a few barrel patchs leaving it alone and seeing what happens.

Its really more personal to you and your rifle. Just note that most people will fire a few fouling rounds before getting down to buisness. This removes any excess oil from the barrel and probably a few other things that aren't coming to mind right now.

Also rimfires are dirty, if you stay in the clean it once in a blue moon park stay extra careful not to overlube. In fact those dry type lubes are very good for rimfires because they aren't wet so the dirtyness of the rounds doesn't build up so much.

Live Free Or Die
February 8, 2006, 09:59 PM
I like to run a patchworm/bore snake through the bore of my .22's (pistol or rifle) at the end of my shooting session. I can't prove it, but it seems like the snake is more effective when the gun is freshly fired and bore still warm.

MTMilitiaman
February 8, 2006, 10:25 PM
Just a couple things to add:

The term you are looking for is crown. If you stratch or ding the crown at the muzzle end of the barrel it adversly affects how gas exits around the base of the bullet, leading to poor accuracy or even destabalized projectiles.

And as with cleaning other firearms, some things are better left clean and dry. It it okay to keep a light coat of oil on the rails or inside of the receiver and the outside of the bolt, and the lugs of a bolt action should be lightly lubricated, but the bolt/breech face, chamber, and bore should always be left clean and dry.

Car Knocker
February 8, 2006, 10:33 PM
How do I clean it? I understand, that it is very important not to mess with the exit end of the barell (or whatever the right term is). However, while cleaning my .357 revolver I cannot keep the cleaning rod from toughing the barell. What do I do to prevent this? Put the rifle in a vice or something?

Kosmo, the bolt can be removed from the CZ-452 to allow cleaning from the breech end of the barrel. Instructions should be in your owner's manual.

lycanthrope
February 8, 2006, 11:15 PM
I lube the bolt of my 452 with CLP (FP-10) and occasionally run a bore snake through the barrel.

Have you checked out the trigger kits on www.cz452.com ?

You should.

lycanthrope
February 8, 2006, 11:16 PM
You hold the trigger in to pull the bolt out for cleaning.

rangerruck
February 9, 2006, 04:04 AM
wipe clean the wood, you can do the birchwood casey three step process to it, or just use a little Pledge on it. wipe down and slightly oil all the outer metal, with just an oily rag is fine. for cleaning the action/bolt /bore: rags and toothbrushes and bore solvent are fine, i do clean the bbl from time to time with a rod and brushes, from time to time, but only when i feel totally ate up with guilt. then when you are done cleaning the bore(inside of bbl) take a oil soaked patch , run it through a couple of times, and leave it be.

MTMilitiaman
February 9, 2006, 04:10 AM
then when you are done cleaning the bore(inside of bbl) take a oil soaked patch , run it through a couple of times, and leave it be.

Only if you plan to store it for long periods of time. Then you can use oil as a rust inhibator. But most bore solvents recommend against leaving them applied to your bore for long periods of time. And the barrel should always be clean and dry when it is used.

gonzo_beyondo
February 9, 2006, 09:32 AM
I guess cleaning is a personal thing. There are so many opinions on the right way, the wrong way, which chemicals, which lubes, patches or snakes, etc.. etc... you will be so confused as to what is right and what is wrong, that you'll ultimately do what you want anyhow.

One nice thing about the debates on cleaning/oiling, is that you'll read about products you never knew existed.

For me, a dirty rifle is not a good thing, I tend to preserve everything I own. Figure, I spend alot of money and time (time = money) on my hobbies, and seeing things dirty or worn is akin to abused or neglected.

Take tools for example, some mechanics toss their dirty tools on a messy tool tray and call it a day... while others, consider their tools as investments, wipe them, oil them, and put them into holders/organizers within chest drawers. I'm the latter type of person.

I like things to remain as new as possible, so I clean and oil.
Take heed of the advice to not overclean because thats detrimental. Just be careful, take your time, and enjoy it... maintenance is a big part of the hobby. I like to take an afternoon with some brushes and remove all the crud, polish up the rifle and put it back looking like it was never fired. :cool:

1911 guy
February 9, 2006, 09:43 AM
Step one, clean the bore. With a .22, a cursory wipe with a boresnake should suffice. Since it's a bolt action, do this from the breach (rear) when possible. Going the other way pulls junk into the receiver.
Two, wipe down the exterior metal with a rag with a little gun oil, CLP, etc. on it. Semi-autos will need a wipe down and LIGHT coat of oil on moving parts.

Three and four are once a year.
Three, remove action from stock and clean the underside of the barrel. Wipe any crud out of the barrel channel with a dry rag or brush.
Four, degrease and re-lube the trigger assembly and any other working parts.

kosmo
February 9, 2006, 04:58 PM
Everyone, thank you very much. Your responses are appreciated.

Sungun09
February 10, 2006, 05:05 PM
Hugging it and kissing it and fondling it.. and saying sweet nothings to it...............oppss.... no honey, I'm not replac.. yes dear... no dear ........sorry ... yes you can have some new shoes...

Doctor Suarez
February 11, 2006, 03:17 AM
I got exactly the same rifle you did. However, due to colds, collecting RKBA signatures at gun shows, and work, I haven't even fired it yet!

Still, I got an Otis all-in-one cleaning kit, and it seems very promising for being gentle to the bore.

It's a pull-through, and the rod is flexible and covered in rubbery plastic. As long as you don't pull the patch out at an angle against the crown, you should be fine.

This is my first .22, and first rifle, so this thread was an education for me as well.

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