Hk 91 Flashhider groove trivia question


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Eisande
February 10, 2006, 10:27 PM
Someone said to me recently, as I was shooting an HK 91, "Do you know what those notches are for on the outside edge of the flash-hider?" I replied that, indeed, I did not. He said, "They are there to allow the gun to be put up against a strand of barb wire, so that the bullet would be perfectly lined up, and this would allow one to cut the wire by firing."
At first I thought, hmm, well, the geometry of it all seems reasonable. Then I saw in an AR 15 forum (I think) that similiar grooves in flash hiders are there merely to provide an easier way to remove the hider, i.e. putting a small tool across the grooves to twist off the hider.

What do you all think?

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itgoesboom
February 10, 2006, 10:42 PM
Always heard it was for cutting wire as well.

I.G.B.

Raygun
February 11, 2006, 12:57 AM
I seriously doubt that. There are far less potentially disasterous ways to cut wire. I'll go with either the removal tool theory, or maybe it's there to mount a rifle grenade on the hider. Or both.

goldshlagerxx
February 11, 2006, 02:13 AM
I doubt it also... Some FH's were made to cut wire, the STG 58 comes to mind. It has an exposed slot that is intended to be wrapped around the wire and then fired.
Adam

Mikke
February 13, 2006, 04:51 AM
I'm pretty sure it's just BS.

They can be used to screw the flashhider on and off to replace it with a blank adapter or possibly somy kind of rifle grenade adapter.

The combination tool I have for my Ak-4 (Swedish G3) can be used by either using the nothes on the front or by using another part of the tool on the ribs of the flashhider, both ways works good, but I usually do it the second way.

Raygun
February 27, 2006, 08:26 PM
A bit late, but I found something relevant to this thread. Here (http://www.sturmgewehr.com/bhinton/Heckler_Koch/HK_FlashHider_Removal_A.jpg).

444
February 27, 2006, 09:27 PM
So what is going on in that picture ?

I don't know the answer to your question, but the idea of using a flash suppressor to cut wire is not far fetched at all (as was already mentioned). The STG58 (Austrian FN FAL) has a flash suppressor on it for just that purpose. The FAL was the German's issue rifle before the HK.
So, I am not saying that is the reason, but it isn't out of the question.

Raygun
February 28, 2006, 03:48 AM
Apparently it's a page from a Scandinavian (not sure which flavor, but I think Norwegian) G3 manual showing that the back edge of the sling hook is used to remove the flash hider by inserting it into the notches in question and turning it. If anyone can translate, be my guest.

Father Knows Best
February 28, 2006, 10:00 AM
It is indeed Norwegian. I can make out some of the words (I speak German and a little Swedish) but not enough to effectively translate.

Raygun
February 28, 2006, 10:47 PM
Thanks for the confirm. I don't think translating would help us much anyway. The only instance I see of "flammeskjuleren", which I take to mean "flashhider", is in the caption for the picture. The rest of the page looks like instructions for "diassembling and assembling the magazine" (Adskillelse og samling af magasinet).

Bobarino
March 1, 2006, 01:22 PM
i don't know about the one on the HK91, but on AR15.com is a video of a flashhider that has half circle cut outs the size of rebar. the video shows a piece of rebar in the FH and a round fired with severed the rebar quite easily. the idea was that after the demo team blows an entrance in a concrete wall, you can use your weapon to cut through remaining rebar and enter.


here's a pic
http://jtacsupply.com/catalog/images/LMT-Rebar-Cutter-WEB.jpg

and a link to the thread with the video.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=3&f=118&t=267578

Bobby

444
March 1, 2006, 10:12 PM
:what:

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