RFID Chips in Employees of a Cincinnati Corporation


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glockamolee
February 11, 2006, 11:24 AM
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/printer-friendly.asp?ARTICLE_ID=48760

CityWatcher is a video surveillence company in cincinatti (one of those "winners" that have city video cam contracts). They required some employees to get "chipped" for "security" reasons.:fire:

It's better that you copy and paste the link.

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Soybomb
February 11, 2006, 11:27 AM
Once people begin 'voluntarily' getting chipped to perform their job duties, it won't be long before pressure gets applied to those who refuse.I say that about drug testing but most people seem to think I'm crazy for minding.

Don't Tread On Me
February 11, 2006, 02:16 PM
This will be the technology used as the final nail in the coffin of firearm ownership.

glockamolee
February 11, 2006, 03:03 PM
It wouldn't be difficult at all to imbed RFID inside a polymer frame... all without the publics knowledge.

BigRobT
February 11, 2006, 03:06 PM
Some speculation of "the Mark of the Beast" is just this, an implanted microchip. I can see that things as we know them will change dramatically over the next decade. I always thought it was predicted by the ATM cards. I can see that, in the not too far off future, that we will be using RFID technology to track our every purchase, move and any other thing that we do. I'm not so sure I like it.

agricola
February 11, 2006, 03:17 PM
Could see it being used by LEO and Fire/Ambulance types as an aid to safety - when you would call for help they would then know exactly where you are and be able to dispatch units accordingly. The same might apply to security personnel, though it would be interesting to see what would happen if people turned around and said "no".

Doubt it would be worth it for everyone else though. That said, chipping convicted criminals might make people think twice about reoffending - determined cons can cut their electronic tags off, but only the most deranged would chew their leg off to get the RFID chip out :D

armoredman
February 11, 2006, 03:30 PM
The only humans I want to see chipped are illegal immigrants. and then kicked back across the border. If we catch them again, and find the chip, we execute them for spying, as they KNEW they were coming across illegally - we explained it the first time.
Put a chip in me? Better wait until I am out of ammo...

Old Dog
February 11, 2006, 03:35 PM
"Once people begin 'voluntarily' getting chipped to perform their job duties, it won't be long before pressure gets applied to those who refuse." That does not necessarily follow. Key word is "voluntarily." They don't have to work there. Frankly, I don't get too worried when private employers require anything, especially if it's a security firm saying it's doing something for security reasons.

Now, if this starts translating to clerks at every 7-11, Kelly office temps, Safeway checkers, construction laborers, hospital nurses, public school teachers, librarians, or the guy who picks up your garbage on Tuesday mornings and never puts the lids back on your trashcans ... then it's gonna be reason for concern.

This will be the technology used as the final nail in the coffin of firearm ownership.And you're just gonna have to elaborate on this one ...

CypherNinja
February 11, 2006, 03:38 PM
I think worrying about RFID chips in firearms might be a bit much, since they'd be easier to destroy than a serial number. Anybody politician who thinks they'd do any good is retarded. Oh s!!t, wait a min............ :eek:



LOL, but think about it. Detail strip, throw frame in microwave for 1 sec, done.

No more RFID. :D :D :D

progunner1957
February 11, 2006, 03:40 PM
The implanted microchip would give "The Government" total control of those implanted - it would be used to track movements as well as call in "eye in the sky" surveillence on a given person or persons.

Microchips could eventually (if they don't already) have the technology to deliver an electrical shock that would render the target person unconscious - say, a fleeing felon, or a gun owner who refused to give up his/her guns...:barf: :barf:

WYO
February 11, 2006, 04:50 PM
If my wife could get a chip implanted that acted as her driver's license, keyless vehicle entry device, ignition starter, garage door opener, residence door opener, credit card and ATM card, she would sign up in a heartbeat.

The trick is going to be separating the positive conveniences against the negative potential of the technology.

saddenedcitizen
February 11, 2006, 04:54 PM
'Could see it being used by LEO and Fire/Ambulance types as an aid to safety - when you would call for help they would then know exactly where you are and be able to dispatch units accordingly.'
If you are calling on a land line they already KNOW where you are !! ( or more correctly, where the phone is !)
Cell phones can be located fairly precisely ( much finer than just the cell the phone is in using signal strength )
and if you're calling for help on a cell, couldn't you TELL them where you are ??!!!
So unless you're lying in a ditch yelling for help this idea is a solution in search of a problem !
I'll pass !!

bg
February 11, 2006, 04:55 PM
The only humans I want to see chipped are illegal immigrants. and then kicked back across the border. If we catch them again, and find the chip, we execute them for spying, as they KNEW they were coming across illegally - we explained it the first time.
Put a chip in me? Better wait until I am out of ammo...
I'm with ya.

taliv
February 11, 2006, 05:53 PM
i think you guys should do a little research into the max range of RFID technology before you get your blood pressure too high

TexasRifleman
February 11, 2006, 05:56 PM
I think it's all a conspiracy by the tin foil companies to drive up demand for their product.....

Don't Tread On Me
February 11, 2006, 07:18 PM
I don't think a religious argument against needs to be made. If anything, that will just embolden the Christianity-hating mainstream in this nation to label those against this as radicals, fanatics, crazy tinfoil hat people etc...


INSTEAD,


This type of thing is so inherently wrong, so jam-packed with potential abuse, so destined to be the most destructive thing to our liberties ever...we don't need to mix in "mark of the beast" type stuff.


It is amazing how laws can be passed to ban this or that, why not get a movement going to make a law prohibiting the implantation of human beings for tracking/security reasons. Pre-emptive - JUST like our founding fathers who wrote a pre-emptive Bill of Rights that contained provisions to protect the very things they knew would be attacked from the get-go.


As a society, a culture and a nation, we should all begin the dialog that this sort of implantation, or marking or whatever identification is INHUMAN. We are men, not animals to be tagged.



From a liberty standpoint, if you get an RFID chip in you - you have submitted to slavery. We have forfeitted our right to keep and bear arms (at least the effective ones), we have given up search and seizure, we've given up speech and almost everything. Now they want to take your very freedom of movement away, essentially instituting slavery.


People don't understand that modern slavery is possible - and is partially in effect. This is because they think that to be a slave, you have to be in chains, beaten, or on a plantation. Modern slavery, like anything else - has a kinder gentler image. And that image has gone right over the heads of everyone.

Don't Tread On Me
February 11, 2006, 07:29 PM
Oh, forgot to add...


This is the slippery slope...first for "high security jobs" then later on even janitors will be forced to have these. Every soccer mom liberal will find a way to justify the use of this technology because Oprah did a show on how one kid was saved by it.


So, if they can do that - and they will - the guns will also go. One way or another.



This is where I draw the line folks. If they make this RFID stuff mandatory - that is when I go to church, do my final prayers, load up everything I have and give them lead.


I will not be implanted. You cannot enslave a freeman, the best you can do is kill him. If this does happen, you'll probably read about it as a story about some crazed gunman...that's how the gover-media works. Ask Carl Drega.

Old Dog
February 11, 2006, 07:33 PM
Uh ... well ... okay, then ... So -- now that you've stated your position, please advise us on just who (and why) would be making RFID implants mandatory for everyone?

BigRobT
February 11, 2006, 07:33 PM
That does not necessarily follow. Key word is "voluntarily." They don't have to work there. Frankly, I don't get too worried when private employers require anything, especially if it's a security firm saying it's doing something for security reasons.

Now, if this starts translating to clerks at every 7-11, Kelly office temps, Safeway checkers, construction laborers, hospital nurses, public school teachers, librarians, or the guy who picks up your garbage on Tuesday mornings and never puts the lids back on your trashcans ... then it's gonna be reason for concern.

And you're just gonna have to elaborate on this one ...

Mexico was proud to announce that they were first to use those chips in Humans. What I see here is that all too often mentioned "slippery slope". First, it's "volunteers", next, it will be mandantory for all employees at that company, then, more companies will follow suit. Finally, the Government will REQUIRE RFID chips for everybody. It happened almost the same exact way with the military and their urinalysis tests for drugs. First, it was the "testing phase", where nobody would be questioned or go to Captain's Mast, then, (very soon after), was people were getting Captain's Mast, then, a couple of years later, people were getting booted out. At THAT point is when I think the civilian world started doing them. (I'm not real sure of the timelines for civilian employment drug screening, as I was military well beyond the time the civilians started that). Religious or not, I don't care for the idea. Besides, I was being facetious with that remark, anyways.:what:

Don't Tread On Me
February 11, 2006, 07:36 PM
Uh ... well ... okay, then ... So -- now that you've stated your position, please advise us on just who (and why) would be making RFID implants mandatory for everyone?


The same people who consider you their favorite source of revenue. The same people who openly state that they own every single person because they can force them, against their will into national service, or into an unecessary war.


Your leaders do not consider you even human. They consider you property. That's called slavery. Do you know what groups of people do to other groups of people who they do not even consider human?

BigRobT
February 11, 2006, 07:38 PM
i think you guys should do a little research into the max range of RFID technology before you get your blood pressure too high
Taliv, you don't watch TV?? What about that commercial from Big Blue about the parts in the truck being "lost"?? They tracked them with Satellite, WHILE the parts were inside a semi's trailer (usually aluminum and would block quite a bit of RF). I could understand it more, had the truck had a GPS system and transponder to do it all.

Old Dog
February 11, 2006, 07:54 PM
The same people who openly state that they own every single person because they can force them, against their will into national service, or into an unecessary war.So by "they" I take it you mean the government. So who's getting forced against their will into national service these days? Did I miss something?

You still haven't really answered the "why" question. So I'll ask again: why do you think the government would mandate RFID implants for its citizens? Inquiring minds want to know ...

Finally, the Government will REQUIRE RFID chips for everybody. It happened almost the same exact way with the military and their urinalysis tests for drugs. Oh, please, give me a break. And -- having spent my adult life in the military, I don't really have a problem with urinalysis, for a couple reasons (1) Nobody is forced to join or stay in the military, it's strictly voluntary; (2) we don't do the type of work where we can afford the luxury of having personnel who routinely use drugs (alcohol abuse is a big enough problem as it is).


It is possible some folks are watching too many reruns of "The X-Files?"

Lucky
February 11, 2006, 07:58 PM
I saw a site where people made a scanner that read people's 'bluetooth' computer networks - from the roof of another building. (looked like a bazooka, for style)

These chips, they will be even easier for people to steal. Can you imagine how many chips a person could download by riding public transit?

And what information was on these chips? ...Everything? Hmm, house, car, bank, everything eh?

And, the low-tech crime, someone wants to get your money, or your car, or your house, or all 3 because that's a 'convenience' of this technology. This someone is an alcoholic thug, they don't know how to turn a computer on, or what RFID means. But they to have a newspaper clip that says what the chips do and that people get these chips put in their __________ (insert body part here), and he also has __________ (insert handware tool here). He removes your _____ with his _____ and then takes your car, goes to your ATM and takes your money, and drives your car with your money to your house, where he enters carrying your severed _______ in his pocket and begins to raid your liquor cabinet, and then everything else he perceives to be of value. He finds your firearm safe, and waves your severed _________ in front of it to open the vault of goodies, thinking how much stuff he can trade for them, and which one he can rob the best with. And as he is doing this the door opens and a woman announces, "Honey, you left the door open on your car but I closed it for you."

And that's just the abuse by one example of criminal. There are also the increased ease for crimes against humanity, and all that good stuff. As well as umpteen other criminal conspiracies that would be invented.

Yea, great f'in technology there. Anyone who tries to put one in you IS the enemy. I don't care if you were just a tailor, if you were sewing yellow stars on people's clothing you should get the same penalty as the fuhrer. Same principles apply here.

BigRobT
February 11, 2006, 08:01 PM
Oh, please, give me a break. And -- having spent my adult life in the military, I don't really have a problem with urinalysis, for a couple reasons (1) Nobody is forced to join or stay in the military, it's strictly voluntary; (2) we don't do the type of work where we can afford the luxury of having personnel who routinely use drugs (alcohol abuse is a big enough problem as it is).



As I, too, have. I watched the incorpoaration of the urinalysis program and how it transpired over the twenty years I was in. I reluctantly participated, as it was part of my duties. However, I feel my analogy was missed.

My best guess is that they (the Government) will start tagging pedophiles and then other criminals. After a successful run with them, it will slowly trickle down to become everyone. As someone stated before, what a better way to keep track of your kids ?? I don't like the concept, period.

LawDog
February 11, 2006, 08:04 PM
The same people who openly state that they own every single person because they can force them, against their will into national service, or into an unecessary war.

I'm sorry, I must have missed the press gangs and the draft. Last I checked every branch of the Armed Forces is all-volunteer, when did that change?

Just who, if I may ask, has been forced into National Service?

LawDog

silliman89
February 11, 2006, 08:06 PM
It must be nice to have nothing more important to worry about than the big evil government implanting chips in our body so they can track us from space and zap us with electric shocks. Maybe the 3rd or 4th generation models will beam an audio and visual feed to the satellite so "they" can monitor everything we see and hear on their central computers.

taliv
February 11, 2006, 08:44 PM
Taliv, you don't watch TV?? What about that commercial from Big Blue about the parts in the truck being "lost"?? They tracked them with Satellite, WHILE the parts were inside a semi's trailer (usually aluminum and would block quite a bit of RF). I could understand it more, had the truck had a GPS system and transponder to do it all.

heh

i work for ibm. most (at least, a large portion of, if not 51%) trucks have these days so that their location can be tracked continuously. reality would be the boxes were scanned as they were loaded onto the truck and then the truck was tracked by GPS.

There are 300 million people in the US alone. All the satellites in the sky combined couldn't track even the people on house arrest, assuming they could read an RFID chip from that distance, which they can't.

Otherguy Overby
February 11, 2006, 08:51 PM
Just who, if I may ask, has been forced into National Service?

LawDog


Well, since you ask, I have.

KriegHund
February 11, 2006, 08:56 PM
Um, NO! Not in me. Ill cut it out.

Non-implants like little credit cards afe fine.

Would not these be messed up by a CAT scan?

joab
February 11, 2006, 09:01 PM
That does not necessarily follow. Key word is "voluntarily." They don't have to work there. Frankly, I don't get too worried when private employers require anything, especially if it's a security firm saying it's doing something for security reasons.

Now, if this starts translating to clerks at every 7-11, Kelly office temps, Safeway checkers, construction laborers, hospital nurses, public school teachers, librarians, or the guy who picks up your garbage on Tuesday mornings and never puts the lids back on your trashcans ... then it's gonna be reason for concern.That was originally the concept behind mandatory drug testing. Then it trickled down to include just about everyone.

I can see within the next decade pest control operators and pool boys being required to get one if they want the job. Once it becomes accepted they will be issued at birth for safety reasons.

Anybody else remember when you only got a SS# when you entered the work force

Justin
February 11, 2006, 09:32 PM
There are already multiple ways to defeat RFID chips. In fact, one of the more ingenious techniques involves making a few modifications to a disposable camera.

BigRobT
February 11, 2006, 09:48 PM
heh

i work for ibm. most (at least, a large portion of, if not 51%) trucks have these days so that their location can be tracked continuously. reality would be the boxes were scanned as they were loaded onto the truck and then the truck was tracked by GPS.


Now THAT I can buy. Being in electronics for thirty some-odd years, that actually makes sense. I do see your point. As technology advances and miniaturization gets better, so will transmitters, etc. Heck, I recall the earliest cell phones that were almost the size of a briefcase. NOW, look at them!! :eek:

And, Joab, Yes, I DO recall getting my SSN shortly before I entered the workforce. The cards USED to say "Not to be used for Identification Purposes" or something like that. In today's world, one's entire life is tied to a SSN.

joab
February 11, 2006, 10:01 PM
There are already multiple ways to defeat RFID chips. In fact, one of the more ingenious techniques involves making a few modifications to a disposable camera.Police radar used to be easily defeatable

CletusFudd
February 11, 2006, 10:04 PM
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/printer-friendly.asp?ARTICLE_ID=48760

CityWatcher is a video surveillence company in cincinatti (one of those "winners" that have city video cam contracts). They required some employees to get "chipped" for "security" reasons.:fire:

It's better that you copy and paste the link.

I just read a paper last week by an electronics nerd in Europe that built a device to hack the chips. He's already tested it and it works. He can read the chip and download the info. There was another article on the same site explaining how to build a rfid zapper out of a disposable camera using the circuit board and replacing the flash with a small coil antenna. If they can build it someone will come up with a way to defeat it.

Soybomb
February 12, 2006, 12:13 AM
As I, too, have. I watched the incorpoaration of the urinalysis program and how it transpired over the twenty years I was in. I reluctantly participated, as it was part of my duties. However, I feel my analogy was missed.

My best guess is that they (the Government) will start tagging pedophiles and then other criminals. After a successful run with them, it will slowly trickle down to become everyone. As someone stated before, what a better way to keep track of your kids ?? I don't like the concept, period.
I think he's suggesting more of a trickledown effect to where it started with saying doing urinalysis of military people seemed to make sense because you're worried about a person under the unfluence driving a tank. Then it turned into police because they have guns. Then into anyone who might have access to sensitive data. Now if you want to push carts at lowe's they expect a cup of urine so they get a better insurance rate. I'm not suggesting thats actually the course that urinalysis for work actually took, but I imagine there would have been a time where most of the country would have been enraged at the idea of such a violation of privacy when it wasn't neccessary. By now we've gotten used to it and more and more places started doing it and its harder to find an employer that doesn't do it than one that does and people are pretty accepting of it because its worked its way into society over many years. Like gun control.

BigRobT
February 12, 2006, 12:43 AM
Soybomb, exactly !!!!

AF_INT1N0
February 12, 2006, 12:45 AM
I think he's suggesting more of a trickledown effect to where it started with saying doing urinalysis of military people seemed to make sense because you're worried about a person under the unfluence driving a tank. Then it turned into police because they have guns. Then into anyone who might have access to sensitive data. Now if you want to push carts at lowe's they expect a cup of urine so they get a better insurance rate. I'm not suggesting thats actually the course that urinalysis for work actually took, but I imagine there would have been a time where most of the country would have been enraged at the idea of such a violation of privacy when it wasn't neccessary. By now we've gotten used to it and more and more places started doing it and its harder to find an employer that doesn't do it than one that does and people are pretty accepting of it because its worked its way into society over many years. Like gun control.


Exactly... What was once an outrage is now a minor inconvenience, "that you shouldn't mind if you have nothing to hide".

Like the Terry Stop
And the War on Some Drugs
GWOT
The Brady Bill
AWB


The only power any government has is the power to crack down on criminals. Well, when there aren't enough criminals, one makes them. One declares so many things to be a crime that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws.
Ayn Rand

c_yeager
February 12, 2006, 03:17 AM
Some speculation of "the Mark of the Beast" is just this, an implanted microchip. I can see that things as we know them will change dramatically over the next decade. I always thought it was predicted by the ATM cards. I can see that, in the not too far off future, that we will be using RFID technology to track our every purchase, move and any other thing that we do. I'm not so sure I like it.


I get tired of this mark of the beast BS. If you want to talk about the mark then you need to actually read the bible or you sound like your repeating nonsense that you heard on the tinfoil isle. According to bible the mark is something that will be both VISIBLE and VOLUNTARY, and you will know what it means when you get it or not. It isnt a trick, thats the whole point.

Lucky
February 12, 2006, 05:32 AM
I doubt many people at all have read the bible to interpret correctly. I haven't read any version, to be honest.

Jules Vern wasn't far off on submarines, nor Galilleo on helicopters, from our modern perspective. From the perspective of their time the differences between what they predicted and reality might seem trivial.

Now, you speak of a book that's a compilation of many pieces, some old, some really really old, in ancient languages, that were compiled and 'streamlined' a few times, most noteably by King James.

We all know the expression, 'lose something in the translation'. We all played that game where you pass a sentence verbally down a line of people.

It's unreasonable to discount the striking similarities, imo, without more evidence. At least evidence using translations from the original writings.

joab
February 12, 2006, 08:01 AM
According to bible the mark is something that will be both VISIBLE and VOLUNTARY, and you will know what it means when you get it or not. It isnt a trick, thats the whole point.Except for the visibility, which is a minor fix, you just described the RFID program as it is today.
You volunteer to get it because you know the benefit is to get or keep the job.
I'm not a tinfoil hattist but this has the very real potential to follow the boiled frog syndrome

Lupinus
February 12, 2006, 08:48 AM
I implanted a dog once with onea them things. Ran away about five years ago and still aint seen him.....I'm not so sure I trust their reliability :neener:

I can see good in it but I also see the bad. No chip for me you can go to the neather world suana.

taliv
February 12, 2006, 09:34 AM
implants don't bother me. i'd love to have a cell phone implanted... some robotic arms, etc as long as they don't make that nah nah nah nah nah sound every time i whip somebody's butt.

i wear a key fob for my toyota prius that wirelessly detects your presense and locks/unlocks the car and lets you turn it on without ever getting the keys out of your pocket. it's fantastic. having an RFID implant that did that would be even better.

i have been known to favor a conspiracy theory or two, and i cringe at the way people throw their information around on the internet, and particularly with stuff like the kroger cards etc. but i just don't see an issue with RFID.

The Freeholder
February 12, 2006, 10:10 AM
Well, I'm showing up to this party late, but my opinion is that I don't need a job bad enough to get chipped. The downside, both current and potential, far overwhelms the upside.

roo_ster
February 12, 2006, 11:09 AM
i think you guys should do a little research into the max range of RFID technology before you get your blood pressure too high
What is the book max range of 802.11b/g? Well, some guys recently got 50+ miles with unamplified hardware. The most common 802.11b/g router can be software hacked to increase the signal past legal limits.

Once the technology becomes pervasive, folks will hack it to their own uses and gov't will do the same.

For some intersting hacks:
http://www.hackaday.com/

Peet
February 12, 2006, 12:01 PM
http://www.rfidanalysis.org/

http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1628696,00.asp?kc=EWNKT0209KTX1K0100440

Has link to RFID zapper: http://news.com.com/2060-10790_3-0.html

And the list goes on, and on, and on...

I gotta go out and buy some tinfoil.

P.

ball3006
February 13, 2006, 11:57 AM
to install on all the smokers in this company so when they start crying and moaning about not having enough time to get their work done, you can pull out the record of how much time they spent in the smoking room...........Women should have a chip installed on their credit cards so the cards can be disabled when they go to the mall................Illegals should be tagged when they are caught in this country. They could also lead to the employer of illegals so the employers can be busted.............chris3

Crosshair
February 13, 2006, 01:46 PM
Didn't the Germans try something like this once? Didn't work out so well.
http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/9705/30/israel.nazi.saga/arm.tattoo.jpg
That is reason enough for me not to go with this. I don't want to be numbered like cattle.

Chrontius
February 13, 2006, 09:01 PM
Taliv, you don't watch TV?? What about that commercial from Big Blue about the parts in the truck being "lost"?? They tracked them with Satellite, WHILE the parts were inside a semi's trailer (usually aluminum and would block quite a bit of RF). I could understand it more, had the truck had a GPS system and transponder to do it all.

First, the truck mostl likely *did* have a GPS system and a transponder. RFID chips are generally unpowered, and their range reflects this.

Implanted ID chips? Never mind that the idea gives me the screaming heebie-jeebies, never mind that if I was getting serious body modification done I'd prefer a forked tongue I could lick my ears with, (:what: ) these things aren't cryptographically secure. (http://cq.cx/prox.pl) Besides that, They're easily destroyed. (http://www.boingboing.net/2006/01/27/howto_turn_a_disposa.html)

Um, NO! Not in me. Ill cut it out.

Non-implants like little credit cards afe fine.

Would not these be messed up by a CAT scan?
No, but an MRI could kill you, worst-case. Best case, they'd have to perform minor surgery before they could look at your head injury, lest the rapidly shifting magnetic field induce a current in the wire antenna, and heat the tag to dangerous temperatures -- as happens with pacemakers. Worst case is if you're standing in the room with someone who has an implant when they switch on the MRI magnet. It rips the implant out of his arm, which flies through your eyesocket and forebrain before cooking the seat of your soul.

Cheery, huh? ^_^

What ever happened to Java Ring technology? Really did have contact read-range, and the tag was smart enough to have strong crypto.

implants don't bother me. i'd love to have a cell phone implanted... some robotic arms, etc as long as they don't make that nah nah nah nah nah sound every time i whip somebody's butt.

There's nothing wrong with some good cyberpunk tech -- I'd be hard pressed to turn down most of what I've read of (Skull gun, anyone?) but that's because of potential benefits for me. What the hell does an RFID implant offer me other than a small scar and a big fear of needles that I can't get now?

LAK
February 14, 2006, 07:09 AM
They required some employees to get "chipped" for "security" reasons

"There's no such thing as implantable biochips. You're just a kook"

How many people suffer from amnesia, and do not recall the not so many years ago when this was the stock reply to what was circulating outside the mainstream news channels?

Now that everyone has to not only acknowledge they exist, but are going to become a requirement for many animals, etc - and now some people - notice the switch to "what a good idea" it all is.

When they become required for everyone, the "what a good thing it is" will become the popular response. And in the meantime we will have plenty trying to tell us that "no one will be forced to have implantable chips in them".

You know; just like no one being forced to disclose their social security number to anyone but the Social Security Administration etc. "No one is forced to get a driver's license or state ID". Etc.

The global plantation masters intend that everyone will have implantable chips; to track them and control them. Even those diehard sceptics, those not suffering from amnesia, should see this coming by now.
-----------------------------------------

http://ussliberty.org
http://ssunitedstates.org

CAS700850
February 14, 2006, 10:17 AM
Maybe I'm a bit behind on my technology, but last I saw, the chips that could be implanted in animals were basically a very short range device that held an identification number. If the scanner was run over the chip, it would read the number, which would then be run through a database to get the additional information.

Okay, it's kind of like those little key-ring devices you can use at the gas station to make your purchase just by waiving it over the reader. Now, have I missed something that would allow one of these chips or whatever to be actually read from a satellite? I'm thinking that something microchip size is not exactly powerful enough to transmit a signal that could be read from orbit, much less on a continuous basis. And, what about a power source? Transmit a signal that strong, and you're going to need a significant powersource. People ain't gonna want a plug hanging off their hips so they can charge up at night.

I'm afraid that I'm more concerned about the corruption of many politicians and the garbage legislation that is offered on a continuous basis, rather than being required to get a chip implanted. Of course, maybe in the new job I'm one of them, and I'm ordering all of teh defendnat's appearing in my court to have the chip implanted... ;)

#shooter
February 14, 2006, 10:20 AM
When they start coming out with GPS locator chips, I will get one for my future son or daughter. I want to know if she is “studying” at the mall or in her boyfriends car in the park.:neener:

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