I'm confused. Private sale in another state - is it kosher?


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White Horseradish
February 14, 2006, 12:56 PM
Once again, the legalities befuddle me.

I live in Minnesota. Suppose I went over to Michigan and met a guy with a rifle to sell. Can I give him the cash and take the guns and go home or does this need to be handled through an FFL? Is this a Fed issue? Is it a state issue? :confused:

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neoncowboy
February 14, 2006, 12:58 PM
Fed law says sales to residents of other states have to be conducted through an FFL.

Snake Eyes
February 14, 2006, 12:58 PM
Rifle: Yes.
Handgun: NO NO NO!!

neoncowboy
February 14, 2006, 01:00 PM
You can check the NRA's guide to federal gun laws here:
http://nraila.org/GunLaws/FederalGunLaws.aspx?ID=60

cuchulainn
February 14, 2006, 01:12 PM
I'd also check the laws of the states involved. Some states have their own laws about "importing" firearms, even your own. A buddy of a buddy moved from Florida to Maryland a few years ago, and he had trouble registering his handguns because he didn't properly "import" his own guns.

That's one more reason I'm glad my folks moved me out of Maryland 30 years ago.

progunner1957
February 14, 2006, 01:20 PM
What about a handgun as a gift between people residing in two different states? Is that kosher, or is it only kosher if both people live in the same state??:confused:

Rockrivr1
February 14, 2006, 01:25 PM
I think for the rifle to be OK, it has to be a bolt action. I know that if I go to the Kittery Trading Post in Maine, I can buy any bolt action rifle I want. They wouldn't sell me a semi auto rifle though. Not sure if that is a hard set rule, but it was one they followed.

Handguns though are a definite no go. You need to ship through an FFL for that. You have to make sure that the handgun is legal in your state as well. Some states have a list of firearms they don't allow to be shipped into the state.

WT
February 14, 2006, 01:25 PM
A handgun 'gift' across state lines requires an FFL be involved.

Totally within a state depends on state law.

Of course, we know that felons are not allowed to accept handguns as 'gifts.'

MechAg94
February 14, 2006, 01:29 PM
For rifles, I think you are okay buying from FFL, but not a normal civilian.

HankB
February 14, 2006, 01:44 PM
I think that under Federal law the only way an individual can obtain a handgun across state lines from another individual without FFL involvement is by inheriting it . . .

geekWithA.45
February 14, 2006, 02:14 PM
The whole RATIONALE for an FFL is that it is license to deal firearms across state lines.

So, no...federal law does not allow private sales across state lines.

answerguy
February 14, 2006, 02:21 PM
You can check the NRA's guide to federal gun laws here:
http://nraila.org/GunLaws/FederalGunLaws.aspx?ID=60

From the site that you were so kind to link to:


Sales Between Individuals

An individual who does not possess a federal firearms license may not sell a firearm to a resident of another state without first transferring the firearm to a dealer in the purchaser`s state. Firearms received by bequest or intestate succession are exempt from those sections of the law which forbid the transfer, sale, delivery or transportation of firearms into a state other than the transferor`s state of residence.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Myself though; since I am not required, as a resident of Michigan, to do a back ground check on you would probably not even ask to see your DL. And if you weren't required to register it in your home state it would seem like, no harm no foul.

1911user
February 14, 2006, 02:33 PM
Myself though; since I am not required, as a resident of Michigan, to do a back ground check on you would probably not even ask to see your DL. And if you weren't required to register it in your home state it would seem like, no harm no foul.

Just hope the out of state buyer doesn't use the gun in a crime or defense shooting. They'll probably run a trace on it and very well might find out about your sale. I'm not sure what would happen then, but you'd be in a weak legal position. Why take the risk?

MGshaggy
February 14, 2006, 06:33 PM
Just hope the out of state buyer doesn't use the gun in a crime or defense shooting. They'll probably run a trace on it and very well might find out about your sale. I'm not sure what would happen then, but you'd be in a weak legal position. Why take the risk?

An especially poignant question considering it would be a felony under federal law (which would permanently strip you of the right to vote and the right to ever own, possess, or buy a firearm again).

Hkmp5sd
February 14, 2006, 06:42 PM
NO firearms may be transferred across state lines by non-licensees (with the exception of firearms left someone in a will). That is ALL firearms. The minimum federal requirement is the firearms must be shipped to a FFL in the buyers state of residence and then transferred to the buyer.

Tory
February 14, 2006, 08:22 PM
"I think for the rifle to be OK, it has to be a bolt action."

You are misinformed. There is no such restriction in Mass. OR Federal law.

"I know that if I go to the Kittery Trading Post in Maine, I can buy any bolt action rifle I want. They wouldn't sell me a semi auto rifle though."

What really happened is that KTP would not sell you any semi-auto that might constitute an "assault weapon" under Mass. law. Had you wanted anything w/a fixed magazine, I'll bet KTP would have taken your money in a flash.

Hawkmoon
February 14, 2006, 08:29 PM
What about the BATFE exception for those states having "contiguous states" provisions in their laws?

I don't know which states that applies to, but I believe if your state has such a provision in its laws, private sale of long guns across state lines is legal.

Graystar
February 14, 2006, 08:33 PM
What about the BATFE exception for those states having "contiguous states" provisions in their laws?

I don't know which states that applies to, but I believe if your state has such a provision in its laws, private sale of long guns across state lines is legal.
Only if a person is purchasing from an FFL, not a private individual.

MGshaggy
February 14, 2006, 08:59 PM
What about the BATFE exception for those states having "contiguous states" provisions in their laws?

I don't know which states that applies to, but I believe if your state has such a provision in its laws, private sale of long guns across state lines is legal.


There is NO "contiguous states" exception in federal law. None. Nada. Nyet. It is a felony under federal law for an individual (non-FFL) from one state to sell or transfer a gun directly to an individual (non-FFL) from another. It doesn't matter if its a contiguous state, if the gun is a bolt action, or if you only do it on the third Sunday of a month after a full moon; private sales between residents of different states is illegal unless at least one party is an FFL. The only exception is for a transfer to an heir as Hkmp5sd mentioned.

pete f
February 15, 2006, 02:45 AM
Just one more thing we need to work on our members of congress to recind. this is a unjustified restraint of free trade.

Crosshair
February 15, 2006, 03:41 AM
I am not sure if this part of the question has been answered. If a person lives on the border of another state and someone on the other side of the river wants to sell a rifle, they meet in person, exchange money and gun, have any laws been broken? I know you can't do it with a handgun, but what about a rifle?

Graystar
February 15, 2006, 06:04 AM
I am not sure if this part of the question has been answered. If a person lives on the border of another state and someone on the other side of the river wants to sell a rifle, they meet in person, exchange money and gun, have any laws been broken? I know you can't do it with a handgun, but what about a rifle?
It's illegal. Federal law prohibits such a transaction.

Shootcraps
February 15, 2006, 08:16 AM
Handguns can only be purchased by a resident of the state they live in. Period. Out of state transactions must go through an FFL.

Many states have agreements with bordering states so residents may purchase rifles and shotguns. But only with the bordering state, and only long guns.

I live in Virginia and can buy a long gun from someone in North Carolina and vice versa.

In most states, private transactions don't require a background check. But if you don't at least ask for a DL to make sure the buyer is a resident of your state, you're stupid. And you're probably setting yourself up for prosecution.

Master Blaster
February 15, 2006, 08:34 AM
MIlk or meat, you cant mix both.

does it have a split hoof and chew its cud?

Kosher is as Kosher does.;)

Do your sales through an FFL, Or SHUDUPABOUDIT.:)

answerguy
February 15, 2006, 09:00 AM
Just hope the out of state buyer doesn't use the gun in a crime or defense shooting. They'll probably run a trace on it and very well might find out about your sale. I'm not sure what would happen then, but you'd be in a weak legal position. Why take the risk?

What weak position are you referring to? Am I required to ask for ID if I sell my own personal gun in FTF sale? Do you ask for a DL when you sell a gun?

MGshaggy
February 15, 2006, 10:23 AM
Many states have agreements with bordering states so residents may purchase rifles and shotguns. But only with the bordering state, and only long guns.

I live in Virginia and can buy a long gun from someone in North Carolina and vice versa.


You can only legally buy a long gun from someone in another state IF the seller is an FFL. Only an FFL can sell to a resident of another state IF the sale complies with the law of both states; an unlicensed individual can't sell a gun to a resident of another state regardless of whether its a long gun or a handgun, or if thier state thinks it OK - that is federal law. Agreements between states don't override federal law.

In most states, private transactions don't require a background check. But if you don't at least ask for a DL to make sure the buyer is a resident of your state, you're stupid. And you're probably setting yourself up for prosecution.

That I'll agree with 100%. Willful ignorance is not a good defense.

EOD Guy
February 15, 2006, 10:33 AM
Handguns can only be purchased by a resident of the state they live in. Period. Out of state transactions must go through an FFL.

Many states have agreements with bordering states so residents may purchase rifles and shotguns. But only with the bordering state, and only long guns.

I live in Virginia and can buy a long gun from someone in North Carolina and vice versa.

In most states, private transactions don't require a background check. But if you don't at least ask for a DL to make sure the buyer is a resident of your state, you're stupid. And you're probably setting yourself up for prosecution.

Such a sale is still illegal. It doesn't matter what state law says. Federal law prohibits the transaction.

1911user
February 15, 2006, 11:28 AM
What weak position are you referring to? Am I required to ask for ID if I sell my own personal gun in FTF sale? Do you ask for a DL when you sell a gun?
I'd think it a weak position if they have a strong case against you for interstate firearm sales without an FFL. It's a federal felony. The question is would they prosecute it, allow you to plead to reduced charges, drop it, or let you go undercover to catch someone else violating firearm laws?

I'm not sure if you are required to see an ID, but I do unless I know them. For a non-hunting firearm, I'll record some DL details and put that info in a safe place.

No interstate firearm sales without an FFL; it's not that hard to understand. I know a few people that will only sell through an FFL even if they live in the same state.

answerguy
February 15, 2006, 11:46 AM
I'd think it a weak position if they have a strong case against you for interstate firearm sales without an FFL.
.
That's kind of like a truism isn't it? Yes if they have a strong case against you. you are in trouble. But, AFAIK, I'm not required to ask for a DL when I sell a gun. So how would they have a case against me?

I'm not allowed to sell to a known felon either, but the catch is how do I know that he's a felon?

Derby FALs
February 15, 2006, 11:57 AM
Once again, the legalities befuddle me.

I live in Minnesota. Suppose I went over to Michigan and met a guy with a rifle to sell. Can I give him the cash and take the guns and go home or does this need to be handled through an FFL? Is this a Fed issue? Is it a state issue? :confused:

Quite illegal unless through a FFL.


(B2) From whom may an unlicensed person acquire a firearm under the GCA? [Back]


A person may only buy a firearm within the person's own state, except that he or she may buy a rifle or shotgun, in person, at a licensee's premises in any state, provided the sale complies with state laws applicable in the state of sale and the state where the purchaser resides. [18 U. S. C 922( a)( 3) and (5), 922( b)( 3), 27 CFR 178.29] (http://www.atf.treas.gov/firearms/faq/faq2.htm#b2)

1911user
February 15, 2006, 01:43 PM
That's kind of like a truism isn't it? Yes if they have a strong case against you. you are in trouble. But, AFAIK, I'm not required to ask for a DL when I sell a gun. So how would they have a case against me?

I'm not allowed to sell to a known felon either, but the catch is how do I know that he's a felon?
At a minimum, you could ask the person if they live in this state and is there any legal reason they cannot possess a firearm?

Let's see, they have a gun that you owned now in the possession of a person in another state who will testify he bought it directly from you. Your defense would be that you "reasonably" believed it was a legal sale. Give your expensive defense lawyer all the ammo he can use to argue "reasonable" in the courtroom. Not liking the GCA68 is probably not going to pass as reasonable.

Just_a_dude_with_a_gun
February 15, 2006, 01:49 PM
The sale may be kosher and Halal, but what it is you're buying, and bringing it back into your state is often the sticking point. Check federal and state laws on the part of your state of purchase and state of residence.

For instance, In CT where I used to live, I could have bought any rifle (that was legal in both states) for cash through another private party. It's bringing it back into NJ that was the issue, as I did not have a FOID card prior to this year...

White Horseradish
February 15, 2006, 01:51 PM
Ok. To sum it up, buying a gun in another state must go through a dealer.

So, suppose I meet this hypothetical guy in Michigan, and we both go down to the friendly neighborhood FFL. Can the FFL do the paperwork and hand me the gun to take home or does it absolutely have to be shipped?

Another question popped into my mind here. Suppose the owner and the gun visited me. There's been lots of talk about BUYING a gun in a different state. What about SELLING a gun in a different state?

I picked Michigan because it is a state over, definitely non-contigious.

Sleeping Dog
February 15, 2006, 02:00 PM
WH,
If you sell a long gun to a resident of another state, going thru a FFL, it's fine, and it doesn't matter which state the transaction takes place (MI vs MN). In fact, the transaction can happen at a FFL in OH. Maybe not IL, due to state laws.

If you sell a handgun in MI to a MI resident at a MI FFL, that's fine. The MI FFL will ensure the MI buyer has a MI "inspection" (we don't call it registration) form.

The only way a MI resident can buy an out-of-state handgun is to go thru a MI FFL. He can buy FTF from another MI resident, but still needs to get both parties to fill out the "inspection" form (available at local law-enforcement establishment).

MGshaggy
February 15, 2006, 02:01 PM
Ok. To sum it up, buying a gun in another state must go through a dealer.

So, suppose I meet this hypothetical guy in Michigan, and we both go down to the friendly neighborhood FFL. Can the FFL do the paperwork and hand me the gun to take home or does it absolutely have to be shipped?

Another question popped into my mind here. Suppose the owner and the gun visited me. There's been lots of talk about BUYING a gun in a different state. What about SELLING a gun in a different state?

I picked Michigan because it is a state over, definitely non-contigious.

You can buy a long gun from an FFL in another state if the sale complies with the state law of both states. Thus, if you live in Minnesota and you drive to meet the seller in Michigan, the two of you can then go to either a Michigan or or Minnesota FFL to transfer the gun to you. If the gun is a long gun, you can go to an FFL in either state. If its a handgun, you'd have to go to an FFL in your (the buyer's) state.

Where the transaction actually takes place is of little consequence (at least in this hypothetical); what matters most is the state of each party's citizenship. A citizen of one state (who is not an FFL) cannot legally buy or sell directly to a citizen (who is not an FFL) of another state. Note that I emphasize the word "directly". You can sell a gun to a citizen of another state but the sale & actual physical transfer must proceed through an FFL.

answerguy
February 15, 2006, 02:09 PM
How is the ordinary person supposed to know that they aren't allowed to buy a gun in another state? Not everyone visits websites like this.
Sure if you go to a gun shop to buy a pistol, the store will tell you you can't do that, but in a private transaction there is no poster on the wall.

erik the bold
February 15, 2006, 02:21 PM
But, AFAIK, I'm not required to ask for a DL when I sell a gun.

If it's a handgun in Michigan, you sure better be looking at that DL.... You also better make sure you fill out the pistol sales record found here (http://www.michigan.gov/documents/ri-060_6454_7.pdf)


.

MGshaggy
February 15, 2006, 02:47 PM
How is the ordinary person supposed to know that they aren't allowed to buy a gun in another state? Not everyone visits websites like this.
Sure if you go to a gun shop to buy a pistol, the store will tell you you can't do that, but in a private transaction there is no poster on the wall.

The ordinary person is supposed to ask and figure out the law. I know its a cliche, but ignorance of the law is no defense.

Brad Johnson
February 15, 2006, 03:11 PM
Summary of fed regs. State regs may differ.


An unlicensed person may buy or sell any legal-to-own firearm to an unlicensed person within his/her state of residency, provided neither party has any other qualifying restrictions on firearms ownership.

See Item B1 - http://www.atf.gov/firearms/faq/faq2.htm#a33



Any transfer of ownership between unlincened persons that involves crossing a state line must be processed through an FFL. It is legal for the seller to ship a firearm directly to an FFL in any state.

See Item B3 - http://www.atf.gov/firearms/faq/faq2.htm#b2
See Item B9 - http://www.atf.gov/firearms/faq/faq2.htm#b8



An FFL can sell handguns only to unlicensed persons who state of residency is the same as the FFL. The only exemption to this is the situation of dual residency.

See item B13 - http://www.atf.gov/firearms/faq/faq2.htm#b12



An FFL may sell long guns to a person from any state, provided that the state laws for both the FFL and the buyer allow the transaction.

See Item B2 - http://www.atf.gov/firearms/faq/faq2.htm#b1



Fed regs do not require any records be kept by individuals who lawfully buy or sell a firearm within their own state of residence. Knowingly transferring a firearm to someone who cannot legally own it is specifically prohibited.

See Item B17 - http://www.atf.gov/firearms/faq/faq2.htm#b16


Brad

answerguy
February 15, 2006, 03:27 PM
The ordinary person is supposed to ask and figure out the law. I know its a cliche, but ignorance of the law is no defense.

Well actually; ignorance is a defense it's just not a perfect defense. For example if there are no speed limit signs up and you get pulled over and get a ticket because the officer says the speed limit is 5 MPH you have a defense. If you drive through an area with no speed limit signs at 95 MPH you have no defense.

JNewell
February 15, 2006, 03:53 PM
Fed regs do not require any records be kept by individuals who lawfully buy or sell a firearm within their own state of residence. Knowingly transferring a firearm to someone who cannot legally own it is specifically prohibited.

True, but I will add that doing so is d@mned good practice. I sold a pistol years ago. Several years later the ATF was all over me, wanting to know about the pistol, which had been found at a crime scene. Having the transferee, transfer date and related info was a big and immediate help.

MGshaggy
February 15, 2006, 04:11 PM
Well actually; ignorance is a defense it's just not a perfect defense. For example if there are no speed limit signs up and you get pulled over and get a ticket because the officer says the speed limit is 5 MPH you have a defense. If you drive through an area with no speed limit signs at 95 MPH you have no defense.

Apples and oranges. Your example is not a case of ignorance of the law being a defense; its a lack of notice. Drivers are presumed to know speed limits and have notice of them by posted signs on the road. The driver would not have had notice of the speed limit if there were no signs on the road so he could not know the law and conform his actions to it. In contrast, all the federal laws we have referenced are published for all to view where we all know them to be - in the US Code. Thus you have notice of the law.

Your example would be more apt if speed limit signs were posted, and a driver could get off because he didn't see (or chose to ignore) the sign.

engineer151515
February 15, 2006, 04:12 PM
..........Agreements between states don't override federal law......



One of the reasons this is so confusing. For example: CCW and school zones. This website attempts to explain Arizona's laws

http://www.dps.state.az.us/ccw/schoolzone.asp

Federal Law: Federal law does not preempt Arizona law. It does however, provide for federal jurisdiction if there is no state or local law in place addressing a specific situation or incident.

Who would have thought? Federal law does not pre-empt State law?


Anyway, I would not want to be the test case for any firearms law. For the transfer fee money, I'd use an FFL across state lines.

MGshaggy
February 15, 2006, 04:28 PM
One of the reasons this is so confusing. For example: CCW and school zones. This website attempts to explain Arizona's laws

http://www.dps.state.az.us/ccw/schoolzone.asp

Federal Law: Federal law does not preempt Arizona law. It does however, provide for federal jurisdiction if there is no state or local law in place addressing a specific situation or incident.

Who would have thought? Federal law does not pre-empt State law?

Actually it does - where the two conflict, federal law trumps state or local law. Where the is no conflict, both can apply. In the case of the school zones you reference above, federal law provides a specific exception for state law to allow gun within the school zone. See 18 USC 922(q)(2)(B)(ii)Subparagraph (A) does not apply to the possession of a firearm— if the individual possessing the firearm is licensed to do so by the State in which the school zone is located or a political subdivision of the State, and the law of the State or political subdivision requires that, before an individual obtains such a license, the law enforcement authorities of the State or political subdivision verify that the individual is qualified under law to receive the license;

answerguy
February 15, 2006, 04:38 PM
Apples and oranges. Your example is not a case of ignorance of the law being a defense; its a lack of notice. Drivers are presumed to know speed limits and have notice of them by posted signs on the road. The driver would not have had notice of the speed limit if there were no signs on the road so he could not know the law and conform his actions to it. In contrast, all the federal laws we have referenced are published for all to view where we all know them to be - in the US Code. Thus you have notice of the law.

Your example would be more apt if speed limit signs were posted, and a driver could get off because he didn't see (or chose to ignore) the sign.

So before I get out of bed in the morning I should check the US Code to see if there are any changes in the law?

MGshaggy
February 15, 2006, 04:51 PM
So before I get out of bed in the morning I should check the US Code to see if there are any changes in the law?

If you're really paranoid, sure. Otherwise I'd just be sure to make a reasonable inquiry into the law when engaging in activities that are highly likely to be regulated under federal or state law...like the interstate sale of firearms.

answerguy
February 15, 2006, 05:01 PM
If you're really paranoid, sure. Otherwise I'd just be sure to make a reasonable inquiry into the law when engaging in activities that are highly likely to be regulated under federal or state law...like the interstate sale of firearms.


If I have a shotgun for sale at my garage sale, is it your opinion that I have to ask him for ID? A yes or no answer would be appreciated.

Brad Johnson
February 15, 2006, 05:06 PM
If I have a shotgun for sale at my garage sale, is it your opinion that I have to ask him for ID? A yes or no answer would be appreciated.

Do you have to? No. Would it be a very, VERY good idea? Yes.

Brad

Shootcraps
February 15, 2006, 05:15 PM
Well actually; ignorance is a defense it's just not a perfect defense. For example if there are no speed limit signs up and you get pulled over and get a ticket because the officer says the speed limit is 5 MPH you have a defense. If you drive through an area with no speed limit signs at 95 MPH you have no defense.


Virginia law says that if there is no sign posted, the speed limit is 25mph. ;)

Ignorance isn't even close to being a fair defense. It's the seller's responsibility to know and abide by the laws as they pertain to the seller. Same for the buyer.

MGshaggy
February 15, 2006, 05:25 PM
If I have a shotgun for sale at my garage sale, is it your opinion that I have to ask him for ID? A yes or no answer would be appreciated.

I don't know Michigan law so I can't comment on the state law implications. Under federal law, however, there is no affirmative duty to check his ID, BUT if it turns out he's a felon or from another state, you can be charged and quite possibly convicted of a felony for an illegal sale.

So to give you a simple yes or no answer - No. But I hope you get a good price for that shotgun, because if you're wrong and he's a prohibited purchaser you can be convicted of a felony, go to jail, forever lose the right to vote, the right to ever legally own, possess, or purchase a firearm again, and thousands of dollars in legals fees. Ignorance is not a defense, and willful ignorance much less so.

Shootcraps
February 15, 2006, 06:09 PM
I checked with several FFLs at the gun show, and all of them said private citizen long gun transfers between Virginia and NC were legal. I'll check again this weekend.

Derby FALs
February 15, 2006, 06:25 PM
I checked with several FFLs at the gun show, and all of them said private citizen long gun transfers between Virginia and NC were legal. I'll check again this weekend.


Why don't you check with the BATFE? It's their jurisdiction :scrutiny:

(B2) From whom may an unlicensed person acquire a firearm under the GCA? [Back]


A person may only buy a firearm within the person's own state, except that he or she may buy a rifle or shotgun, in person, at a licensee's premises in any state, provided the sale complies with state laws applicable in the state of sale and the state where the purchaser resides. [18 U. S. C 922( a)( 3) and (5), 922( b)( 3), 27 CFR 178.29] (http://www.atf.treas.gov/firearms/faq/faq2.htm#b2)

MGshaggy
February 15, 2006, 06:37 PM
I checked with several FFLs at the gun show, and all of them said private citizen long gun transfers between Virginia and NC were legal. I'll check again this weekend.

Its legal for the FFL to sell to an individual in another state. If they say its legal for an individual of one state to sell a firearm directly to an individual of another state they are wrong. Here's the law:

18 USC 922(a)(3)It shall be unlawful— for any person, other than a licensed importer, licensed manufacturer, licensed dealer, or licensed collector to transport into or receive in the State where he resides (or if the person is a corporation or other business entity, the State where it maintains a place of business) any firearm purchased or otherwise obtained by such person outside that State, except that this paragraph (A) shall not preclude any person who lawfully acquires a firearm by bequest or intestate succession in a State other than his State of residence from transporting the firearm into or receiving it in that State, if it is lawful for such person to purchase or possess such firearm in that State, (B) shall not apply to the transportation or receipt of a firearm obtained in conformity with subsection (b)(3) of this section, and (C) shall not apply to the transportation of any firearm acquired in any State prior to the effective date of this chapter;

Brad Johnson
February 15, 2006, 06:44 PM
Hmmmm, seems like I summarized all of this - including links to the relevant sections of the BATF(E) FAQ page - about 15 posts up.

Or maybe I'm just insane.

Brad

halvey
February 17, 2006, 10:07 AM
Rifles, handguns, it doesn't matter.
Read below. Private sales between residents of different states can be a felony. Notice it says gun, not handgun. This would include rifles.

halvey
February 17, 2006, 10:09 AM
.

Tory
February 17, 2006, 10:48 AM
"Hmmmm, seems like I summarized all of this - including links to the relevant sections of the BATF(E) FAQ page - about 15 posts up.

Or maybe I'm just insane."

No; you're trying to teach the unteachable - those who don't listen to the answer when THEY asked the question; don't bother to make ANY effort to find anything out for themselves, even after you provide a link they need only click on; and don't really want to know because they intend to do it wrong anyway.

Remember the dictum about singing lessons for pigs? :uhoh:

SIOP
February 17, 2006, 11:11 AM
I checked with several FFLs at the gun show, and all of them said private citizen long gun transfers between Virginia and NC were legal. I'll check again this weekend.


No I.Q. test required to obtain an FFL. No shortage of FFL's who have absolutely no idea what the rules and regs actually say. No shortage of non-FFL's who will tell you exactly what the rules and regs are even though they, too, have absolutely no idea.

fletcher
February 22, 2006, 02:57 PM
When selling across state lines, can one ship directly to a FFL in the buyer's state for the sale, or do interstate shipments need to be FFL-to-FFL?

SIOP
February 22, 2006, 03:08 PM
When selling across state lines, can one ship directly to a FFL in the buyer's state for the sale, or do interstate shipments need to be FFL-to-FFL?

You can ship directly to an FFL in the buyer's state providing he'll accept a firearm from a non-FFL. Some FFL's won't because they are ignorant of the law or their state has a restriction against it. No federal requirement that interstate shipments be FFL to FFL.

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