I'm in the game, almost


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TBert
February 19, 2006, 10:10 AM
I just bought my first rifle, and I need some help with the scope. I bought a Remington 700 bolt action 30-06. I will primarily hunt deer, hogs and targets at a max distance of 200 - 250 yards.

Any advice?

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stoky
February 19, 2006, 10:32 AM
Get the best scope you can afford. Skip the cheapest scopes. Leupold and Burris are good quality and not terribly expensive. IMHO the investment in good optics in a fixed 4x or 6x would preferable to variable power. If you can afford it there is nothing wrong with spending more on the scope than the rifle.

dakotasin
February 19, 2006, 01:00 PM
leupold vx-2 3-9x40.
leupold vx-3 3.5-10x40 if you can afford it.

ID_shooting
February 19, 2006, 01:12 PM
I packa Leupold VXIII 2.5-8 on my '06. Mostly carried on 2.5 power 8x used when a good rest is available. I have never felt under scopped at all, I paid $275.00 for mine off e-bay

jeremywills
February 19, 2006, 01:21 PM
I concur, good optics is always worth your investment. In fact I spent more money on a decent scope for my .22 than what I paid for it and now Im wanting to scope one of my Mosin Nagants and once again Ill be spending more on optics than the silly rifle :) Not like Nagants are expensive :) but don't scrimp on optics. Like already stated, Burris and Lepuold is good stuff, if you have to be mindful of your budget Simmons has some decent stuff too. Somthing 4x fixed should be plenty. Just remember, 30.06 is plenty of power, cheapo scopes won't hold up under that sort of recoil, buy one that will.

BOOM
February 19, 2006, 01:43 PM
What's your budget? As mentioned, get the best you can afford. I've had a Tasco scope on the deer rifle I've used for about the last 20 years. I think I have adjusted it maybe twice in all those years after sighting it in. I paid about $90 for it and it has not let me down. I've often thought about getting a better scope for it, but the darn thing works fine.

That said, I'm currently in the market for another deer rifle just because I want something different and I plan to get a Leopold or Nikon this time. However, if I couldn't afford one, I wouldn't hesitate to put a Tasco on it.

Limeyfellow
February 19, 2006, 02:11 PM
What's your budget? As mentioned, get the best you can afford. I've had a Tasco scope on the deer rifle I've used for about the last 20 years. I think I have adjusted it maybe twice in all those years after sighting it in. I paid about $90 for it and it has not let me down. I've often thought about getting a better scope for it, but the darn thing works fine.

That said, I'm currently in the market for another deer rifle just because I want something different and I plan to get a Leopold or Nikon this time. However, if I couldn't afford one, I wouldn't hesitate to put a Tasco on it.

The older Tasco lens were quite good from 70s, made in Japan. Its just the modern stuff that is tripe. You have the same problem with telescopes with Tasco. If you get the lenses and such from the 70s you are well sorted. Tasco just went really down hill when they switched the makers.

Zen21Tao
February 19, 2006, 02:55 PM
The first scope I bought was a cheap $60 BSA 3-12x50mm scope for Walmart. This scope was "ok" out to about 150 yards but it wouldn't hold it's zero that great. I would find myself having to rezero it every time I went to the range. I upgraded to a Leupold 4-12x40mm. The Leupold was a couple hundred $$$ more but was really worth it. It gives a much clearer picture than the BSA and less parallax.

rangerruck
February 19, 2006, 03:01 PM
get the most scope you can get as far as quality goes. you dont need over a 4x12 power. you also should get the largest objective lens you can get, as in a 50mm front lens.

hoghunting
February 19, 2006, 03:41 PM
Try the Burris Fullfield II 3-9 X 40. It has better light transmission than the Leupolds VXI & VXII for a brighter picture. I have used this scope in the field for two years and highly recommend it. They also have a lifetime warranty.

dakotasin
February 19, 2006, 11:16 PM
you also should get the largest objective lens you can get, as in a 50mm front lens.



i disagree w/ that. i think any objective greater than 40-44mm's is wasted money, weight, and light gathering for almost all legal hunting activity. however, not being a hog hunter, or familiar w/ those rules, i will allow that i could be off base on this one.

JohnKSa
February 20, 2006, 12:00 AM
WARNING! BEFORE reading farther, please read the disclaimer at the end of the post.

Don't go too high on the scope power. It will cost you extra and you're not going to need it. A good 3 to 9 power scope will give you more than enough magnification for good accuracy to 250 yards.

If you plan to hunt when the light may be low then go for a larger objective, but don't go crazy. Your eye can only use so much objective at a given power. Anything more than 45mm on a 3 to 9X scope is probably not giving you any significant benefit.

If you've not mounted scopes before, find a good gunsmith and have him mount and boresight the scope for you. I think that many (if not most) "rifle accuracy" problems are actually scope mounting problems.

Get a hard rifle case. It doesn't have to be expensive, Wal-Mart often has $12 specials on plastic cases. If you're going to travel on airlines, something sturdier (and more expensive) is warranted, but for going to and from the range, a cheap case is enough. It will keep your rifle from collecting dings and dirt during transport. If you plan to use an ATV or pack your rifle around in dusty conditions, get a thin soft cover that you can use to keep the dust out of the gun when you can't use a hard case.

Don't skimp on the ammo. After you've spent several hundred dollars on a scope & rifle combo, you don't want to judge its performance on the basis of bargain basement ammunition. Hornady and Federal are usually a pretty good bet for terminal performance and accuracy.

Get it sighted at the bench and then practice shooting from positions that are realistic for your hunting scenario. A bench is (obviously) almost never available, and most people probably shouldn't take 200yard offhand shots at game. See what you can do from a sitting or prone position and if you can, try some shots using improvised rests. Remember that if you're using a hard rest (no bag or pad), you should keep your hand between the rest and the gun for best accuracy.

hoghunting
February 20, 2006, 12:59 AM
Try the Burris Fullfield II 3-9 X 40. It has better light transmission than the Leupolds VXI & VXII for a brighter picture. I have used this scope in the field for two years and highly recommend it. They also have a lifetime warranty.

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