Question about Mil-Dot range estimating


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xjmox14x
February 20, 2006, 10:15 PM
I've got a question that's been bothering me about mil-dot range estimating. 1 mil is approx. 3.6" at 100 yards. So if you're sizing something up, saying it's 1.6 mils, you can calculate the distance to the target if you know the actual size of the object. My question is, when using the mil-dots, what power should the scope setting be on??? 1.6 mils at 3x is no where near the same as 1.6 mils at 24x. Can someone please explain this to me???

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444
February 20, 2006, 10:28 PM
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=154213&highlight=OPtics

On many scopes, you need to know at what magnification the mildots are accurate.
Or, you buy a scope where the scale is in the first focal plane of the scope.

Infidel
February 20, 2006, 10:36 PM
As 444 said, scopes with the mil-dot reticle in the rear focal plane will only read mils correctly at one power setting. Some use 10x, some use full power. Your Owner's Manual should tell you. Whether or not the manual specifies, it's a good idea to check it for yourself. Tape a yardstick to the target frome at 100 yards; it should read 10 mils total, subdivide as desired. There is a printable "Mil-Dot Confidence Target" at http://home.earthlink.net/~hwsportsman/CompTargets.html that works well; it's 2 mils wide and high at 100 yards. After I check it, I mark the exact setting on the power ring.

You can also use the mil-dots at other power settings by multiplying your result by the quotient of the "calibrated" power and the actual power setting. That is, if the scope reticle is calibrated for 10x and you have it set for 14x, then adjust your calculated range by 10/14 (=1/1.4).

xjmox14x
February 21, 2006, 12:46 PM
Good idea Infidel, thanks a lot.

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