Looking for a snub-nost .357 Mag, any ideas?


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shotgunner
February 21, 2006, 11:12 AM
Looking for a snub-nosed .357 magnum. This gun should be as small as a .38 SPL in size, but be 6 shot capacity. Any links would be appreciated!
Trying to keep affordability, and blued-steel or stainless in mind. No Titanium!

Thanks!

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Husker1911
February 21, 2006, 11:16 AM
The six shot capacity is a fly in your ointment. It causes the cylinder to become significantly larger in diameter. If you insist on this, I'd recommend the Ruger SP101. If you're willing to choose a five shot, S&W offers several good choices. Good luck.

TMM
February 21, 2006, 11:19 AM
the Ruger sp101 is a five shot capacity.
the GP-100 is a six shot, but it's a large frame. the fixed sight model, however, has a shorter grip. perhaps one of those with a 3" barrel...

failing that, Taurus probably makes one, or S&W.

~tmm

GUNKWAZY
February 21, 2006, 11:31 AM
If used is not a problem, try a S&W model 19 (Blue) or model 66 (SS) snubbie.
I own both and both are great shooters, 6 shot .357 Magnums.
Expect to pay in the $300-$400 range for minty examples.
I love both of mine.

Jeff (GUNKWAZY)

Jkwas
February 21, 2006, 11:35 AM
Taurus makes several 7 shot 357 snubs . Check out their website. Also rossi has 6 shot 357's.

birddog
February 21, 2006, 11:37 AM
I have the Taurus 651B. Excellent concealability, and extremely accurate.

5 shot.

James T Thomas
February 21, 2006, 11:39 AM
Investigate a three inch barrel Ruger GP100. One inch more from a "snub," and significantly improved.

MCgunner
February 21, 2006, 11:49 AM
Personally, I wouldn't get less than a 3" barrel on it for ballistic reasons. The .357 is not a good 2" caliber. Avoid the super light titanium/scandium stuff.

My personal favorite is a five shot and I don't own one, but would like to, the 3" SP101 Ruger. It's actually quite shootable and the longer barrel gets more from the load without sacrificing good IWB concealment and reasonably easy draw.

farscott
February 21, 2006, 11:51 AM
I cannot think of anything in current production that fits all of the requirements. The SP-101 is out because it is a five-shot, and the six-shot current revolvers are all around the K-frame in size. Colt used to make the answer, the Colt Magnum Carry. It was a Detective Special-sized revolver in .357 Magnum. Have not seen one in quite some time.

461
February 21, 2006, 01:02 PM
When's the last time you shot something five times with a .357 and it still needed shot again? :D Not trying to be rude, but the main reason snubbies are usually five shot is because they aren't meant to be a combat weapon but simply a just in case easy to carry weapon. When you go for that sixth shot you generally have to step up in frame size to accomodate it, you can't have your cake and eat it too in this case. If a medium frame works for you then there are a lot of choices out there, but six shots in a small frame generally makes it a .32 H&R Magnum. The old Colt Magnum Carry gave six shots but is quite a bit bigger than a J frame or even an SP-101.

Jkwas
February 21, 2006, 01:34 PM
Rossi 6 shot 357 snub http://www.rossiusa.com/products/product-details.cfm?model=R46202&category=REVOLVER

taurus 7 shot 357 snub http://www.taurususa.com/products/product-details.cfm?model=617SS&category=Revolver

:)

MCgunner
February 21, 2006, 01:44 PM
I had a little Rossi M971. While it was a full 6 rounds, it was a little lighter/smaller than full K frame. It wasn't J frame small, but it only weighed about 30 ounces unloaded with a full lug 4" barrel. It was a tough, fairly accurate little gun. This might be the ONLY gun that really fits your description currently available. I would reckon it'd be about the size of the old Colt Magnum carry.

hurrakane212
February 21, 2006, 06:42 PM
+1 on the Rossi snubbie. Mine holds six and I got it for about 200. The SA is very nice especially. It handles .38 specials no problem. 125 grain .357 Mags on the other hand... you may want to pick up some hogue or pachmyer grips. You have to be a brave man to shoot .357 mag out of ANY snubbie. It's rough on the hands... on the up side, it's much rougher on the BG. My reccomendation is to plink w/ .38's and carry .357. Make sure you clean your gun after using .38's because the .38 is shorter and so when it fires a residue builds up in the cylinder which makes it difficult to put .357's in.~Nathan

Ala Dan
February 21, 2006, 07:04 PM
+1 for a 2.5" barrel S&W model 66 .357 magnum~!:D

But, if you can't find one a Ruger SP-101 will do nicely.:cool:

ozarkhillbilly
February 21, 2006, 10:39 PM
+1 on the Rossi R461 blued or R462 stainless six shot sub-nosed. I have the blued R461 and it has been a great little gun lifetime warenty but I've had no trouble with mine and shooting 357mags out of it is no problem. Mine was around $250 got it 3 or 4 years ago but to be honest I have only put around 500 rnds through it.

perpster
February 21, 2006, 10:44 PM
Personally, I wouldn't get less than a 3" barrel on it for ballistic reasons. The .357 is not a good 2" caliber. Avoid the super light titanium/scandium stuff.

Does this hold true with the recent introduction of Speer Gold Dot Short Barrel ammo specifically designed for 2" snubbies?

An earlier post mentioned the Rossi R46202. Wow! 6 shots in a small .357 package that doesn't have the bullet slip weight issue that Sc/Ti S&W's do?? I admit to being a S&W snobby but this revolver, at $362 MSRP, is challenging that. I know nothing about Rossi's. Are they quality? They have a lifetime warranty.

One odd thing, though: The manual says:

"Rossi revolvers are designed to use cartridges loaded to the limits shown
below. Other cartridges of various types or bullet weights may or may not
function acceptably; such ammunition should be thoroughly tested by the
user before relying on it. Because of the widely differing specifications of
such other ammunition, Rossi and/or Braztech cannot be responsible for
malfunctions resulting from its use.
BULLET MUZZLE
CALIBER WEIGHT VELOCITY
.38 Special ..............................................158 GR 755 FPS
.357 Magnum ..........................................158 GR 1450 FPS
GR = grains
FPS = Feet per second
“Plus-P’, “PIus-P-Plus” or other ultra or high velocity ammunition
generates pressures significantly in excess of the pressures associated with
standard ammunition. Such pressures may affect the useful life of the
firearm or exceed the margin of safety built into many pistols and could
therefore be DANGEROUS."

So you can fire .357 Magnum but not .38 +P ???:confused: I'm talking steady diet, not ocassional use of .38 +P and/or .357 Magnum.

Also, when you click on the link for cylinder photos it shows a 7 shot cyliner. Ooops.

ozarkhillbilly
February 21, 2006, 11:42 PM
I have fired almost all 357mags out of mine with maybe one box of .38spl have not had a bit of trouble. I am no expert but I do not see any reason why you could not fire +P+ or +P .38spl out of any 357mag

perpster
February 21, 2006, 11:45 PM
I have fired almost all 357mags out of mine with maybe one box of .38spl have not had a bit of trouble. I am no expert but I do not see any reason why you could not fire +P+ or +P .38spl out of any 357mag

Only thing I can think of is frame stretching, but this is a .357 and seems to be a steel frame, so not bloody likely. Just odd the way it's worded in the manual.

Any downsides to a Rossi compared to a S&W?

crashm1
February 22, 2006, 01:56 AM
I second the S&W model 19. I have one and it has a good smooth DA trigger and in SA it breaks perfectly. It is also pretty damn accurate at any reasonable range as long as I do my part. Having a bit of wieght to it helps as well.

birddog
February 22, 2006, 07:12 AM
You have to be a brave man to shoot .357 mag out of ANY snubbie. It's rough on the hands...

Like any caliber discussion, this is a matter of personal perspective. I shoot my Taurus snubby (651) with full-load .357's all the time. Sure the gun jumps, but it doesn't hurt and I don't think it's hard on my hands. I enjoy shooting it, believe it or not. On the other hand, my father shoots 38+P's out of his and thinks it is MURDER on the hands.

I'd give several guns and loads a try -- if possible -- before you take anyone's secondhand advice.

Trebor
February 22, 2006, 07:37 AM
I carry a S&W Model 65 with a 3" barrel. It's a K-frame, so it's larger than a J-frame snub, but it holds six shots. It's also easier to shoot than any J frame.

J&G Sales has 3" Model 10 .38 Special K-frames on sale for $179. If your willing to carry in a holster, instead of in a pocket, that would be a good choice.

eagle45
February 22, 2006, 07:44 AM
All of my snubbies are 5 shot with the exception of a Taurus 617, and it is a 357 mag seven shot. I've put many 357 rounds through it. Yes there is some recoil to deal with but it is manageable if that is what you want. It is also getting easier to find holsters for this model if you are looking for a ccw revolver. Taurus' web site has it listed at $391 for the blued model, but $300 is realistic for a new one.

http://www.taurususa.com/products/product-details.cfm?model=617B&category=Revolver

MCgunner
February 22, 2006, 10:06 AM
Does this hold true with the recent introduction of Speer Gold Dot Short Barrel ammo specifically designed for 2" snubbies?

An earlier post mentioned the Rossi R46202. Wow! 6 shots in a small .357 package that doesn't have the bullet slip weight issue that Sc/Ti S&W's do?? I admit to being a S&W snobby but this revolver, at $362 MSRP, is challenging that. I know nothing about Rossi's. Are they quality? They have a lifetime warranty.



Rossi's are well built guns. I've owned 5 of 'em and every one was a quality weapon. I'd buy more. I own 2 now, a little .22 revolver that is super accurate, little kit gun with adjustable sights and 4" barrel on a J frame size chassis, and a M68 blued 3" J frame size .38 that is also very accurate. They seem well built and reliable. I had issues with one of 'em snapping the firing pin, but it was put right by fitting a new one and I fired a couple thousand rounds out of it after that before trading it for a nice Ruger .45 Blackhawk with some change thrown in the deal. Kinda wish I still had it, but that .45 is awesome.

I can't honestly say what the new Speer load shoots like. I get the impression it's more about flash suppression than optimized magnum performance, but I've not tested it. Maybe someone with a 2" gun that's shot it over a chronograph could speak intelligently about the load. I handload most of my stuff. I don't know if I've ever fired a factory .357 load that I can remember in a gun I owned. I once experimented with Unique trying to load a faster powder in the .357 for acceptable velocity with less flash in a 4" gun, but it wasn't a productive exercise. I've always handloaded for the round and have never actually carried one for self defense. It's always been an outdoorsman's caliber/gun to me. The ballistics I've seen on 2" vs 3" vs 4" were in a gun magazine article some time back before the Speer load was available. Actually, I've seen a couple of articles on the subject and it pretty much made me figure the gains in velocity from a 2" gun ain't worth the price to be paid. I have fired a 2" steel gun and that pretty much put the period on the opinion.:D It's .38+P for me!

Marshall
February 22, 2006, 11:29 AM
Drop 1 shot and get a Model 60 J-Frame 357.


http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c274/bunnfuzz/dcp_0555.jpg

http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c274/bunnfuzz/dcp_0559.jpg

perpster
February 22, 2006, 12:20 PM
Marshall, nice lighting!

Not to hijack the thread, but I see the Bianchi Speed Strips in the photo. I've always used speedloaders, but just picked up a pair of Speed Strips. They're a lot stiffer than I imagined. Is there a link to a site that discusses how best to use them tactically?

Marshall
February 22, 2006, 12:30 PM
Thank you.

Actually I prefer speedloaders to the strips. The strips worked well for the picture though. :D You just have to bend them and put in 3 at a time or so, or however many you can get in when bending them.

ozarkhillbilly
February 22, 2006, 09:29 PM
Any downsides to a Rossi compared to a S&W?

As much as I like my little Rossi it does come in second compared to a Smith but it also alot cheaper and is still a great little gun. Rossi is made by Taurus now and I think they have come along way in workmanship. I do not know of anyone else making one in that size and caliber for near the price.

MCgunner
February 23, 2006, 07:42 AM
Marshall, nice lighting!

Not to hijack the thread, but I see the Bianchi Speed Strips in the photo. I've always used speedloaders, but just picked up a pair of Speed Strips. They're a lot stiffer than I imagined. Is there a link to a site that discusses how best to use them tactically?

Best to use 'em for tactical reloads. IOW, you're in a shoot out, duck behind cover, you've fired four rounds, you wanna top off. You open the cylinder, you push up the cartridges and pluck the spent rounds, you use the speed strip to load two at a time into the cylinder and you're topped off.

Two adjacent chambers at a time is how you load. It isn't as fast as a speed loader on an empty gun, but it's pretty quick and they're a lot easier to carry than a speedloader. I do carry a five round speed loader, recently got a quite excellent and compact Safariland speedloader, but I also carry a speed strip. Gives me the option to top off if I need to.

perpster
February 23, 2006, 10:20 AM
Best to use 'em for tactical reloads. IOW, you're in a shoot out, duck behind cover, you've fired four rounds, you wanna top off. You open the cylinder, you push up the cartridges and pluck the spent rounds, you use the speed strip to load two at a time into the cylinder and you're topped off.

Thank, MCgunner. Although I wonder in the heat of a gunfight how easy/hard it would be to identify and remove the spent shells without accidentally popping unspent shells out too.

I know, I know: practice, practice, practice. Just an observation. Before we were allowed to carry speedloaders on my job we used to practice loading 1 or 2 rounds by hand and closing up the cylinder to fire at a charging bad guy with just those 1 or 2 rounds without pulling the trigger on any empty chambers first. I can still do that in my sleep, so I guess the speed strip drill can be learned by this old dog, too.

Thanks again.

shotgunner
February 23, 2006, 10:37 AM
Wow.
Thanks for all of the replies. I've got some research to do now. I appreciate the quick feedback.
Thanks everyone.

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