What's the general opinion about the Marlin Golden 39A?


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V4Vendetta
February 21, 2006, 06:50 PM
See my title. How much does one cost on average? Is it a good .22 ?

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dfariswheel
February 21, 2006, 07:12 PM
The Marlin 39 is certainly the finest lever action .22 of all time, and is just as certainly in the top 5 .22's of any type ever made.
Many people will argue about what other .22 lever guns are possibly as good as the Marlin, few will even try to argue another one is BETTER.

It's made of solid forged and milled steel, and American walnut, just like it's been since 1891.

The heavy barrel with Marlin's "Micro groove" rifling usually produces near target rifle accuracy.

The action gets smoother over time and use, to the point where it seems to operate itself.

My sole complaints are: The newer versions have a cross-bolt safety added that I don't care for, and like a total idiot, I sold mine some years ago.

You don't see too many used Marlin 39's around, and that's because most people are smart enough to KEEP them.

Prices are higher than the stamped metal and aluminum others use, but then a Mercedes costs more than a Ford for good reasons.


If this doesn't convince you to buy one, you're a bigger idiot than I am.:) :)

BAD_KARMA
February 21, 2006, 07:53 PM
+1 for what dfariswheel said. Except I never sold mine and still get it out and shoot it once in a while. And don't forget it is a takedown rifle.

mp510
February 21, 2006, 07:58 PM
The Marlin 39 is a great rifle. I don't own one, but I shot one in the past. The one that I shot was a TDS, and it was finicky with the ammo, and the accuracy could have been better, but it was a carbine so I give it a little leeway. The other problem is the price. The most recenmt new 39A I saw was $425. I saw 39 M (20") on line for 300,+ship and transfer but that was used.

Gordon
February 21, 2006, 08:40 PM
+ 2 for DFARRISWHEEL
I keep a early 60's golden 39A as my primary garden patch gun. It is accurate as my 513T Remington and a lot faster into action. It's a lot more accurate than my Browning .22 which is like the run of the mill auto loaders. These are great investments!:)

bearmgc
February 21, 2006, 08:50 PM
I own a Marlin 39 Golden, bought it for $329 LNIB 1 1/2 yrs ago. It is running smoother as I fire it more, but it was pretty smooth out of the box. I put a 2.5x scope on it and use it on squirrels. Its the only 22 rifle I own. Don't see a need for anything else. It is very well made, and a take- down to boot.

StrikeEagle
February 21, 2006, 08:51 PM
Annie Oakley did her trick shooting with one. You won't find better! :)

IV Troop
February 21, 2006, 09:07 PM
The Marlin 39 is certainly the finest lever action .22 of all time, and is just as certainly in the top 5 .22's of any type ever made.
Many people will argue about what other .22 lever guns are possibly as good as the Marlin, few will even try to argue another one is BETTER.

It's made of solid forged and milled steel, and American walnut, just like it's been since 1891.

The heavy barrel with Marlin's "Micro groove" rifling usually produces near target rifle accuracy.

The action gets smoother over time and use, to the point where it seems to operate itself.

My sole complaints are: The newer versions have a cross-bolt safety added that I don't care for, and like a total idiot, I sold mine some years ago.

You don't see too many used Marlin 39's around, and that's because most people are smart enough to KEEP them.

Prices are higher than the stamped metal and aluminum others use, but then a Mercedes costs more than a Ford for good reasons.


If this doesn't convince you to buy one, you're a bigger idiot than I am.:) :)

Big +1 !!

I have owned a number of fancy and basic 22 rifles. Most have been sold. My Marlin 39A Mountie (20"bbl) will never be sold. The day before yesterday I took it out hunting rabbits and had a wonderful time with it. Mine has a compact Burris 2x7 on it.They are truly fine field pieces. Magpies curse the 39A!!

I could get rid of all my 22 rifles and just shoot the Marlin Mountie and be perfectly satisfied.

Northwet
February 21, 2006, 09:23 PM
I have owned the short-barreled Model 39 for 13 years now while other 22s have come and gone. It's a keeper. I put a Williams Foolproof receiver sight on it to match my centerfire lever actions.
North"wet"

mirage
February 21, 2006, 09:47 PM
I just picked up a 39a a few weeks ago. They are amazing, I was looking at the henrys or a 10/22. The 39a is in a different class. The one I found is a '57, the action is smooth as silk. This is one of the few guns I would highly reccomend.

SwampWolf
February 21, 2006, 10:42 PM
Like Northwet, I installed a Williams receiver sight on my 39, like I have on three of my centerfire levers. I've got more than a couple of .22s in my battery but it would be a toss-up between the 39 and a little Steyr Zepher bolt-action as to which would be last to go, if ever that dreaded decision would be necessary.

You'll have to look long and far before you ever find an owner of a 39 with any serious criticism. My only complaint involves the lawyer -inspired trigger pull. I don't have a real issue with another lawyer- sired gimmick found on later 39s-the crossbolt safety.

MechAg94
February 22, 2006, 12:02 AM
I like my Golden quite a bit. I bought it several years ago and have no complaints. I have used it for plinking almost exclusively, but it is accurate and easy to handle. When I bought it, I had no idea what the differences were. I looked at a Marlin and a Browning at Carter's Country. The Browning was a rattle box. The Marlin was tight and smooth so I bought it. I haven't regreted it.

YodaVader
February 22, 2006, 11:02 AM
I have owned one for 9 years now. Like some others have mentioned the accuracy can be surprising. In this day and age of plastic, hardwood and aluminum the 39 gives a general feeling of owning something that is totally traditional - solid walnut and steel. I have the 24" barrel which is more muzzle heavy than I like , I wish I had bought one of the shorter barrel versions when they were still available. Although many say the 24" balances perfectly for them.

I did buy a shorter barrel Winchester 9422 , it has a MUCH smoother action but is not nearly as accurate.

The main drawback of my 39 was the out of the box trigger - at gritty 7.5lbs it was the worst trigger of any firearm I had ever owned. Was incredibly difficult to hit anything smaller than a Cape Buffalo. Working on the hammer produced a trigger that is now one of my best!

I will always keep mine - to me , the all-time classic Marlin 22.

pete f
February 22, 2006, 12:32 PM
If you can find a used one from the 50's or 60's. new ones have come back s great deal but old ones are like butter on hot glass. so smooth.

Only real thingto look for is to make sure who ever owned it did not take it down a whole lot. I have seen two that were a bit sloppy in the middle and I will say both seemed to have been taken apart an awful lot.

Other wise, add the receiver sight, find a old lyman if you can they look better sigght there. Some add a scope but a receiver sight will makle you a better shot all around so use it.

Balog
February 22, 2006, 06:33 PM
Does anyone have a reference for what year a serial number was manufactured in? Or am I gonna have to try and get that history of Marlin book I've seen ads for?

Kurt
February 22, 2006, 06:59 PM
Everytime I've ever hefted a Marlin 39 I couldn't shake the feeling that it's too long and barrel-heavy for a multi-purpose rimfire. Then Winchester brought out the 16" Trapper version of their 9422, and the rest is history (for me and lever .22's).

Considering Winchester's recent decisions, I will consider it a win/win situation for a long time to come.

Shane333
February 22, 2006, 07:02 PM
I inherited a 1952 Marlin Model 39 from my dad. It's one of the most incredible rifles I've ever handled. A truly amazing offhand shooter.

It's a tactile (not tactical) pleasure to work the action. I love this rifle.

ArmedBear
February 22, 2006, 07:05 PM
I missed out on a 20" with a nice peep sight, in perfect condition, about a year ago. Still slapping myself. $229 I think they wanted for it.

Henry455
February 22, 2006, 07:45 PM
My 1958 Model 39A Golden Mountie I inherited from my Dad. One of my prized possessions:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v691/Henry455/Marlin%2039A/Marlin39A015A.jpg

Henry455
February 22, 2006, 07:52 PM
Does anyone have a reference for what year a serial number was manufactured in? Or am I gonna have to try and get that history of Marlin book I've seen ads for?

You can go here and get the year:

http://armscollectors.com/sn/marlinlookup.php

Gordon
February 22, 2006, 07:53 PM
Simply beautiful, your father had taste!:)

Dr.Rob
February 22, 2006, 07:57 PM
I will say only this:

it is perhaps the finest .22 I've ever handled... and that's even compared to an honest to goodness FN Browning take-down. Super accurate, not too pricey, made to last.

IV Troop
February 22, 2006, 08:02 PM
My 1958 Model 39A Golden Mountie I inherited from my Dad. One of my prized possessions:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v691/Henry455/Marlin%2039A/Marlin39A015A.jpg

Beautiful

P. Plainsman
February 22, 2006, 08:24 PM
I can only speak to the recent production 39As with the crossbolt safety.

They are good guns. Above all they are very nicely made guns in this era of MIM and plastic. Forged blue steel, good wood, comfortable butt pad. I also liked the smooth and tight feel of the lever action. The box trigger was rather heavy -- I think this is a problem with current 39As compared to the older guns. I don't know whether there is a good aftermarket trigger kit for the 39A like the superb Wild West Guns trigger kit for the Marlin 1894.

The only real trouble with my 39A was that it jammed a little too much, even when clean. The jams weren't constant, but they were severe -- cartridge got caught in the lever action and the gun had to be disassembled to clear. If not for that, it would have been a keepsake .22.

As it happened, I sold my 39A and spent part of the proceeds on a cheap Marlin 60DL autoloader. Nowhere near the creature comforts or pride of ownership that came with the 39A -- but the little self-loading 60 has been perfectly reliable through its first c. 1000 rounds, and it is even more accurate than the lever gun was.

Sulaco
February 23, 2006, 09:22 AM
What's the general opinion about the Marlin Golden 39A ???

It is the best 22 rifle ever made PERIOD

V4Vendetta
February 23, 2006, 09:48 AM
Simply beautiful, your father had taste!:)



+9999999.

OldWolf
February 23, 2006, 11:06 AM
My 1981 Golden 39A is fun to shoot, accurate and built to last more than my lifetime.

kevin387
February 23, 2006, 12:36 PM
Like most I love mine. I've had it less than a year and it has only been out a few times but it shoots great. A couple of points that sold me on it that I still like is it readily takes down and will fire shorts or longs or long rifles without a hitch even in the same tube. The cb caps are quiet enough to shoot in the garage. Not that I would know anything about that;) .

Brian Williams
February 23, 2006, 12:45 PM
I have wanted one since I first saw one in a Tire store in mid state Ohio in the 70's. It was a Mountie and I finally got mine this year, Promptly put a Lyamn 66mc on it and it is great. Now I want a Lyman 17a globe front sight for it. I paid $299 for mine. I have an old Sears bolt action that I got because it was less expensive in Sears instead of that nice Mountie across the street at the Tire store. I have kicked my self for a long time for not getting that Mountie. I would throw out that old Sears but it has some great memories. I also have a Ruger 10/22 for just blastin' but nowhere near as accurate as the Marlin 39m.

danurve
February 23, 2006, 01:15 PM
Beautiful

What he said.

brickboy240
February 23, 2006, 03:37 PM
It is surprisingly accurate for a lever action.

I have an early one, without the crossbolt safety. Love it. Very fun to shoot and a very well made rifle, overall.

They have never been inexpensive guns. New ones go for ab out 375 and used ones can be had for anywhere from 250-350.

If you like it, go for it...Marlin has been making the thing for over 100 years and has changed it very little, because it flat-out works and works very well.

- brickboy240

Backfired
February 23, 2006, 03:41 PM
I've got the carbine model with the straight rather than pistol grip stock. It's well balanced and the most accurate and reliable .22 I've ever shot. I wouldn't sell it even if I could get 3 times what I paid for it.

Tylden
February 24, 2006, 06:29 AM
I agree with the general concensus here. My 39A is a 1967 model and simply an outstanding rifle all the way around. I also have a CZ 452 Ultra Lux that is an absolute tack driver, but what do I take to the range with me ? The 39A .....this gun is a blast to shoot and very accurate. Other .22s may come and go, but the Marlin 39A is an heirloom rifle that is one of my prized possessions and will be passed down to my son one day.

Tom C.
February 24, 2006, 08:26 AM
I only have two Model 39As, a 1962 vintage 39A that I bought new, and a 1969 vintage 39A Mountie that I bought last year in almost new, hardly fired condition. The old 39A I had as a teenager and it has seen untold thousands of rounds. It has a Redfield receiver sight. The Mountie is the gun I currently use. It also has a receiver sight, a Williams, but I like the straight grip. It matches my Marlin 94 that I use for CAS.

JustsayMo
March 7, 2006, 02:48 PM
I'll join the chorus of 39A fans. I love mine! All THREE of them.

http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/view?p=999&gid=8725444&uid=4173592
http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/view?p=999&gid=8725444&uid=4173592
I have other nice rimfires including a tackdriving CZ 452 American with a Leupold scope but my most used are the 39's. They are just more fun. My only regret is I didn't aquire one sooner. For a walking around in the field gun, I can think of no better.

KaceCoyote
March 7, 2006, 03:23 PM
Holy crap the 39A is take down! I never knew! Anyone have pics of a taken down 39A?

chuckles
March 7, 2006, 08:43 PM
Another echo here. My favorite firearm, and I own a few. Mine is a newer,
(2001), and I can't imagine any rifle being more satisfying to own, handle or shoot. I put a Marbles Tang Peep siight on mine and I love it. Get one and be forever happy!:cool:

JNewell
March 7, 2006, 08:49 PM
the 39A is take down

Ditto the 9422. Both great guns. The 39 is, IIRC, the longest produced gun in the US, edging out the 1911 by about a decade.

Mal H
March 8, 2006, 12:52 AM
" What's the general opinion about the Marlin Golden 39A ???"


Heard enough yet?

Ok, one more - I love my 39A, and that's all there is to say.

JohnBT
March 8, 2006, 07:51 AM
I don't shoot my Mountie much anymore. Maybe I'm getting bored with it after 43 years. :o

John

JustsayMo
March 8, 2006, 09:46 AM
JohnBT, If you are getting bored with it and want to find yourself a new fling... I'd be happy to make room at my place for your Mountie. ;)

The one thing I don't like about the Marlin 39 in any variation is I can't seem to walk away from one without buying it...

Mal H
March 8, 2006, 10:32 AM
I noticed that!

You have a fine looking collection there, Just, if I may call you by your adverb. ;)

That picture is a good representation of the quality of wood Marlin uses on their 39A's.

KaceCoyote
March 8, 2006, 11:36 AM
Anyone have pictures of a broken down 39A?

Rodgerp
March 8, 2006, 11:55 AM
About six or seven years ago I went to my local shop to buy a Henry. I happened to look over and a customer was at the used rifle rack looking over a lever gun. He put it back in the rack and left. I had to check it out: A 1966 Mountie. Price tag was $225.00 (Henry's were $189.00 I think)
I offered the shop an even $200.
I wouldn't sell it for anything.
It is my wife's favorite.

JustsayMo
March 8, 2006, 12:03 PM
Kace I sent a picture to the email you have listed in your profile. PM me if you didn't get it.

davek
March 8, 2006, 05:46 PM
My 39M is the first rifle I ever owned. I still have it and cherish it.

First rifle I ever shot was my mom's old Mountie. :)

tmeyerabc
February 3, 2007, 07:16 PM
The Marlin Golden 39A. I didn't even know what I had when my dad bought the rifle for me for my high school graduation in 1969. I used it extensively, put on a scope and love it dearly. Only recently I have heard from others what I had already known, it was sweet. Guess I didn't know how much others would pay for one though.

As far a breakdown questions, that is the way to clean it effieciently. The main bolt backs out and it comes apart at the breech, at the lever location. The ejector hook/whatever you call it, is pushed down and held in place with a turn screw for cleaning. pretty easy and efficient.

Tom

Skofnung
February 3, 2007, 07:25 PM
I have one, and it is my favorite rimfire, possibly even my favorite gun. I certainly shoot it more than any other gun.

You will not regret getting one.

Sistema1927
February 3, 2007, 08:38 PM
My best .22 rifles are all take down, listed in order of preference

1. Winchester 1906 (only #1 due to sentimental reasons, this one was the first firearm I ever shot, at age 8, and still gets some use 43 years later)
2. Marlin 39A (My absolute best .22 rifle)
3. Browning Auto .22 (I lusted after one of these as a teenager, but could only afford one as an adult)
4. Taurus 63 (very nice copy of the original Winchester, like the Marlin it is a solid "adult" rifle)

Jubjub
February 3, 2007, 10:44 PM
I've never owned one, but my uncle's 39A was the first rifle I ever fired, when I was ten years old. He set me up with it on his bench rest and sat on my right single loading it for me. As I recall, the little holes appeared right where the crosshairs were.

A bunch of 10/22s and a few miscellaneous Remingtons take care of my rimfire rifle needs at the moment, but I certainly would jump on any reasonably priced 39 that came my way.

robctwo
February 4, 2007, 12:33 AM
I traded a couple center fire rifles I never shoot any more for one this past year. Put a red dot on it, kind of old tech and new tech. Very nice rifle.

http://i39.photobucket.com/albums/e186/robctwo/IMG_2643.jpg

This has the new cross bolt safety.

CajunBass
February 4, 2007, 02:02 AM
I bought this one in 1982. I forget what I paid for it.

It's dropped a few squirrels in it's day. I think I'll keep it.

http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b292/CajunBass/Cajunshoots054.jpg

(Pay no attention to that Ruger box. I had just gotten a 10/22, and the box was just there.)

cslinger
February 4, 2007, 02:05 AM
There are .22s and there are real rifles that just happen to be chambered in .22. The Marlin 39 is the latter by far. The 39A is one of the finest .22s made and has an immense amount of history behind it to boot. Basically Marlin 39s are a damned fine rifle that will make a fine heirloom to your grandkids kids.

Steel and Walnut the materials and makings of real guns.

Chris

ArfinGreebly
February 4, 2007, 03:53 AM
Heard enough yet?

No. I need to squrim a little more, so keep those cards and letters coming.

Tax Refund.
Tax Refund.
Tax Refund.

I wonder what I'll spend my Tax Refund on this year?

Ridler12
April 23, 2007, 12:13 AM
Hi,

My father passed away in Feburary and I now have his 39a Mountie. We have 11 boys and 2 girls in the family and I'm number 12. I don't remember much about this rifle but one of the older brothers said Dad had it for over 55 years.
I checked out the one link to find a date using the serial numbers.
The numbers came back as being made "before 1883".? Does that mean Dad's gun is 124 years old???? That doesn't seem right, the gun works perfectly and I can't imagine it's that old.
Could that date be accurate?

dfariswheel
April 23, 2007, 12:52 AM
No, the Model 39-A Mountie was made from 1953 to 1972.

Most post-war Marlins have a letter prefix in the serial number. You have to input that ONLY in the site here:

http://armscollectors.com/sn/marlinlookup.php

Go down to the SECOND input box listed under "Marlins made 1948 and after".
Put in the letter ONLY, no numbers.

Ridler12
April 23, 2007, 10:53 AM
Thanks, That makes more sense....

I'm going to take it out today and check the scope he had put on it, I don't do much recreational shooting but I'm willing to give it a "shot":)

I'm more of a Glock 22, mossberg 500 kinda guy...

skeeter1
April 23, 2007, 08:29 PM
I've had my Marlin 39D (carbine-length barreled version of the 39A) since 1971. From a discussion on a previous thread, I got out the original sales receipt from the safe, and I paid $68.50 for it, brand new. Don't you wish.

It's an OK target shooter, but certainly no heavy-barreled bolt action rifle. As a plinker, they don't get much better. For small game hunting, it doesn't take a back seat to anything. Many a squirrel, rabbit, crow, etc., out to 100yds.

It was my first .22 rifle, and I've never been tempted to buy another. I have a feeling that anything else would just be a disappointment. :)

skeeter1
April 23, 2007, 09:17 PM
I don't have any pics of my marlin taken down, but I think this .pdf file of the Marlin manual describes it better than I could anyway.

Appsy
April 28, 2007, 02:08 AM
i dont own one but i will they are the finest lever action .22 made

Nematocyst
April 28, 2007, 03:55 AM
Everytime I've ever hefted a Marlin 39 I couldn't shake the feeling that it's too long and barrel-heavy for a multi-purpose rimfire.Kurt, even though I'm a proud owner of a new Marlin 39A (sold a fine CZ 452 to buy it; another thread by Robctwo had a lot to do with that), I agree with you on that. But I'm pretty sure I'm going to have my barrel cut down to 18-20" as soon as I'm able financially. (Not at the top of my list right now, says the $-stressed business owner...)

V4V, when you get your 39A, or even if you just want to discuss the rifle more while deciding,
please come join us here (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=261635). Several who have posted in this thread are over there as well ...

Sulaco: Thanks for your PM. (Good to hear from you.)
Not ignoring you, just overwhelmed at work. Will respond soon ...

Capstick1
April 28, 2007, 01:07 PM
This is probably my favorite .22. It doesn't jam or malfunction like the 10/22's do when they get dirty. I found mine at a pawn shop and haven't ever regretted it.

Seven High
April 28, 2007, 01:10 PM
Is anyone aware of a gunsmith that would smooth up the action and lighten the trigger pull on Marlin 39s?

SwampWolf
April 28, 2007, 01:38 PM
Wish I could help you there "Sabotage Alert". My 39, like most others I've seen recently, has a truly crappy trigger. Still, from an embarrissingly large inventory of firearms, it would be among the last to go if I had to make some ugly choices.

TCB in TN
April 28, 2007, 03:08 PM
JohnBT, If you are getting bored with it and want to find yourself a new fling... I'd be happy to make room at my place for your Mountie.

The one thing I don't like about the Marlin 39 in any variation is I can't seem to walk away from one without buying it...

I will second that sentiment, the only problem is that here locally you cannot find the older style ones. I grew up shooting my mom's late 60's 39A Mountie, and after I started getting other .22's I realized how great a gun the 39 is. I have owned most all the different major brand .22s including many more expensive rifles. NOTHING else is close. Buy it, you WILL love it, and keep it.................... Of course if you buy it and don't like it, I might be persuaded to take it off your hands at a discount price.:evil:

xx78
April 28, 2007, 04:15 PM
I have a Marlin 39 Mountie. It is one of the best 22s I own. I will pass it down to my Son and I'm sure he will pass it down to his.

koja48
April 28, 2007, 04:33 PM
Mine is old (1950), so I should upgrade, right? NOT! And it still works & shoots exceptionally well, even after all the combine rides, the countless rounds it has digested, and the trips it made in a rifle scabbard. If I ever find another old one, I'll buy that, too, just because . . .

Gaucho Gringo
April 28, 2007, 05:28 PM
Sistema1927 - I too own a Winchester 06-Expert in 1\2 Nickel that I first shot at age 7 and have had since I was 12 (had mine foe 44 yrs and has been in the family for over 76 yrs). I have been looking for another 22 rifle the 39A is looking pretty good to me. I would like to find one with a 24" barrel and straight stock. Second choice would be a Taurus 62.

Sistema1927
April 28, 2007, 09:17 PM
i just went back and re-read my post, and noticed that I mentioned having the Taurus 63. Nope, don't have one of those, it was a typo and instead I have the Taurus 62. It is a nice solid rifle, but the marlin 39 is still king.

Ridler12
April 30, 2007, 12:47 PM
Hi,
Question for everyone.
My 1963 39a (thanks for the website to look up the dates) was my fathers and I am thinking about selling it. Could I do so at this forum? It's a very nice rifle, but I just don't see myself being able to use it. Everyone here seems to be almost a family because of this rifle and I trust your input. This was Dad's rifle not mine (does that make sense?) and I'm reminded each time I shoot it. Any thoughts?

StrikeEagle
April 30, 2007, 01:31 PM
This was Dad's rifle not mine (does that make sense?) and I'm reminded each time I shoot it. Any thoughts?

Yes! I think you should keep your father's rifle. For sure. Why would you sell it?

I wish I had my old man's gun. :(

Gustav
April 30, 2007, 01:46 PM
One of the best lever actions ever produced its still in production while most competitiors have come and gone.
Forged steel with walnut stock and Marlins micro groove barrel an American classic made in the U.S.A. for generations.;)
Only real complaint heard is its cost buy it once and never look back.
I vote two thumbs up!:D

jkingrph
May 1, 2007, 05:05 PM
My hands down favorite, probably because Dad got it for me when I was in the second grade back in '52. Even though I do not shoot it much, if I had to give up everything else, it would be the one to keep!

Appsy
May 13, 2007, 05:01 AM
" April 28th, 2007 04:08 PM" i dont own one but i will they are the finest lever action .22 made

well as i said now i do own one my father in law decided he didnt use his anymore so now i own one :D :D

JohnBT
May 13, 2007, 09:52 AM
"JohnBT, If you are getting bored with it and want to find yourself a new fling... I'd be happy to make room at my place for your Mountie."

Thanks for the offer, but I think I'll keep it.

I didn't sell it when I wanted to buy my first car, and I didn't sell it when I was flat broke during college and after grad school, and I didn't sell it when I bought my first house and was spending half my takehome on the mortgage for a 65-year-old post-Victorian townhouse that hadn't been heated for 2 years and needed a few other major things done to it.

And times have changed for the better. I certainly don't need the money these days. :D

John

hoggunner
February 21, 2008, 08:55 PM
anyone have a Mountie that needs a new home or know of one??

harley0711@yahoo.com

QUINO
May 12, 2008, 11:55 AM
He esperado durante un año y medio para recibir mi Marlin golden 39a.
En cuanto la tube fui al campo de tiro para probarla,la cargue con RWS R 50,fue perfecta, me encantó y se cumplieron mi espectativas,suave comoda y extrordinariamente precisa, pero cuando la cargué con CCI todo se me vino abajo,tenia que disparar dos y hasta tres veces para que saliera el tiro,cambie a R25(.22 corto),sin problema.Cuando cargué RWS SHORT tenia que extraer el cartucho disparado con la navaja porque no se podia sacar con el procedimiento de descarga.
Hoy está de camino al vendedor a ver si me la ponen bien.

OldWolf
May 12, 2008, 12:10 PM
I have hoped during a year and means to receive my Marlin golden 39a. As soon as tube I went to the field of fire to prove it, the loading with RWS R 50, she was perfect, it enchanted to me and my espectativas were fulfilled, smooth cofashion and extrordinariamente it needs, but when I loaded it with CCI everything came to me down, tapeworm that to shoot two and up to three times so that it left the shot, changes to R25(.22 corto), without problema.Cuando I loaded RWS SHORT tapeworm that to extract the cartridge shot with the knife because podia not to remove with the unloading procedure. Today it is of way to the salesman to see if me they put it well.

OldWolf
May 12, 2008, 12:11 PM
Sometimes online translators are not perfect. :rolleyes:

TexasRifleman
May 12, 2008, 12:14 PM
Mi primer problema con la marlin 39a

I don't like CCI shorts either. They jam up pretty much everything I try to use them with.
Try some other ammo if you can get it, don't just sell the thing off.

OldWolf, you used an online translator? It's pretty far off :)

I can read the post but I can't type a reply back that's for sure!

OldWolf
May 12, 2008, 12:43 PM
I used Babel Fish. I liked the part about the RWS short tapeworm!

My M39 shoots tapeworms, I mean CCI shorts without a hiccup. :uhoh:

QUINO
May 12, 2008, 12:56 PM
Siento mucho no poder expresarme en ingles ya que no es muy bueno.
Gracias por la traducción.
La munición CCI a la que me refiero es .22 lr CCI STANDAR

glockman19
May 12, 2008, 12:59 PM
TRANSLATED:
Mi primer problema con la marlin 39a

Siento mucho no poder expresarme en ingles ya que no es muy bueno.
Gracias por la traducción.
La munición CCI a la que me refiero es .22 lr CCI STANDAR

My first problem with marlin 39a I feel much not to be able to express to me in English since it is not very good. Thanks for the translation. The ammunition CCI to which I talk about is 22 lr CCI STANDAR

jkingrph
May 12, 2008, 01:45 PM
It is the best 22 rifle ever made PERIOD

I'll second that!

Hokkmike
May 12, 2008, 02:33 PM
I should imagine that it will get great reviews!!!

QUINO
June 8, 2008, 03:06 AM
:mad:Buenos dias Señores.
Hace una semana que he recibido la carabina del armero.Según la factura dice que le ha cambiado el muelle "mainspring".
Al dia siguiente la probé y continuaba fallando,aunque, menos con la CCI 22 l.r.
Decidí repararla yo mismo.Encontré mala terminación en las piezas,que tuve que limar y pulir,rebabas de mecanización,en el breech bolt.No llegaba a cerrar completamente cuando se cargaba.
Ahora,por fin,la estoy disfrutando,pero tengo que darle algun retoque donde entra la uña estrcatora en el cañón para que estraiga todas las vainas vacias.
Tengo la sensación de que este arma como venía para el extrangero,España,NO ha pasado un buen control de calidad.

JimmyN
June 8, 2008, 08:36 AM
I have a Golden 39A that I bought new over 40 years ago, and I have to say they improve with age and use.

I couldn't even guess how many rounds I've put through it over the years, but the action on mine is very, very smooth now that it's been "broken in" :)

mtngunr
June 8, 2008, 03:41 PM
Senor Quino, if the problem is ignition rather that feeding/cycling, my review from yesterday might help....the problem is rather common...
http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=369126

Art Eatman
June 8, 2008, 04:49 PM
Per a buddy of mine, Quino said it does not function properly with CCI shorts, it does not extract the brass as it should and sometimes has to be extracted with a pocket knife.

mtngunr
June 8, 2008, 05:26 PM
If the case is partially loose and can be rotated with a knife/pick/awl/etc., and then falls out easily, the burred brass from the firing pin hit/strike might be hanging on something at the 12-o'clock, as mine did this exactly one time in over 500rds....since it hasn't happened again, I haven't worried about it....if it does, I'll look harder to see what's happening.....could just be the brass burr catching on the inside of the scope mount hole or cartridge guide spring....fix could be as easy as scraping a burr off the inside/top of the receiver or beveling the top edge of the firing pin....

mtngunr
June 10, 2008, 12:00 PM
Senor Quino, I was able to duplicate the extraction problem in my gun two times out of about 300 shots fired while slowly cycling the lever....what is happening in my gun is that the burr/ridge on the cartidge rim from the firing pin strike can hang on the the small flat spring inside the top of the gun, this spring called the "cartridge guide".

Using the firing pin indentation on the case rim, the case can be rotated to clear the spring, where it should come out easily instead of prying it out.

The repair should be simple on such a simple gun....that spring/cartridge guide is retained by a single screw through the top of the gun. First, make sure the screw is tight. Second, if not loose, remove the screw/spring and inspect for anything stuck behind it, pushing it down further than it should go. Third, simply filing/polishing a beveled edge on the bottom forward end of the spring should allow the case rim to slide past the spring/cartridge guide. If that doesn't easily fix the problem, order a new guide.

Caution....this is a flat spring, and any scratches left on the metal might cause the spring to crack during use...polish all work, and don't scratch up the spring.

aka108
June 10, 2008, 12:33 PM
With or without the Spanish lesson, the Marlin 39A is a very fine 22RF rifle and one that should last 10 lifetimes. Bought mine in 1955 for 65 bucks brand new. Sounds cheap today but putting 65 bucks together back then was big time savings and heavly expensive. Glad I got mine before some idiot decided to gold plate the trigger.

ralpho1
October 17, 2008, 07:13 AM
Just to add my voice to the throng, it's a great gun and I've had it since the late 50's . It's an L series (1954) and it's in great shape. I just put a new Bushnell 4x rim fire scope on it and it still puts em downrange right next to each other. The other gun in my collection that shares an equal place, is a Ruger single six (3 screw) 4 5/8 in barrel, also bought in the late 50's. I sent that back to Ruger for the "fix" (trigger bar safety, and although they sent all the original parts back, I kinda wish I hadn't done it.

aka108
October 17, 2008, 11:57 AM
Great rifle and one I won't get rid of while thinning out the herd. Bought it new in 1955 along with a new Chevrolet. The Marlin was a expensive rifle back then when 2.00 per hr was a living wage (sort of). The price today is not really any different than it was then. Just a dollar of diminished value due to inflation. The Chev was 1,500 bucks.

Omaha-BeenGlockin
October 17, 2008, 12:04 PM
Mine was nice gun in the short time I had it--but traded it yesterday for a new Browning T-bolt.

Nice gun but I couldn't get past the tube loading process---what a pain in the rear.

QUINO
October 31, 2008, 06:32 AM
Señor MTNGUNER muchas gracias por hacer suyo mi pequeño problema de extracción en mi 39 con cartuchos SHORT de RWS.
Siguiendo su consejo revisé el fleje que guía la munición a la recamara del cañón.Lo desmonté y vi que tenía un canto muy vivo al final donde toca con la parte percutida del cartucho,haciendo que algunas veces no extrajera la vaina.
La acción que he tomado ha sido pulir dicho canto o final del fleje, y así el borde sobredimencionado por la acción de la aguja percutora no tope con el fleje.
THANK YOU VERY MUCH:):):):)

moooose102
October 31, 2008, 06:43 AM
imo, it is a great gun. top quality. buy one, and you wont be sorry. but again imo, there are a little pricey. if money is an issue, the henry is a nice little gun as well. it just is not the same quality as the marlin. you will find painted instead of blued parts, and plastic where there should be metal. but it does shoot pretty good. just depends on what you can live with.

shooter448
December 3, 2008, 10:37 PM
whats a better rifle for plinking and hunting, the browning bl22 or the marlin 39a?

cland
December 4, 2008, 11:15 PM
Have owned two, very good, accurate and made of good US steel and wood. I did have a problem with one feeding cartridges, cured by replacement of an inexpensive part aft of the magazine tube on left hand rcvr when broken down. Simple fix, no further problem. Love the rifle.

Art Eatman
December 5, 2008, 09:57 AM
shooter448, better that you start a separate thread for that question, please?

Art

Harve Curry
December 5, 2008, 10:07 AM
I thought I was going to the next gun show in Albuquerque to get a bolt action 22, now I'm all confused. I'll be looking at Marlin 39s.

bubbiesdad
January 19, 2009, 04:04 PM
Got my golden 39A 30 years ago. Around $90 for it and 500 rounds of ammo. Checked the price for a new one this past weekend. :eek:

f4t9r
January 19, 2009, 06:49 PM
Top of the line !!!

Divaythsarmour
May 11, 2009, 11:42 AM
I just bought an old Marlin 39 A. I paid $379 here in the People's Republic of Massachusetts. What a great gun! I shot a half dozen rounds of long sub sonic (plinking at around 30 yards). It sounded like an air gun. The loudest sound was the lead hitting the can and ground.

The lever action feels really nice. I'm debating whether or not to refinish the wood. It looks like someone filled a 1/32nd " natural crack in the wood grain and there's plenty of surface wear and scratches. I would rather see the natural beauty of the wood (with the crack and all). :)

OldWolf
May 12, 2009, 09:34 AM
I love mine. I call it 'Ol Faithful!

mainmech48
May 12, 2009, 11:48 AM
I've owned my 39M for a bit over 30 yrs. The only reason I haven't had one longer is that I couldn't fully appreciate its sterling qualities (or afford to buy a new one) until I was a relatively mature adult.

I put a Williams Foolproof receiver sight on it the same day I got it. I replaced the original brass bead front with a FO a few years back in a grudging concession to my aging eyes. Other than that, it's only needed ammo.

IMO, the main reason those older M39s folks purchase work so much slicker than the newer ones they've handled is that they've been shot more. Mine worked an entire order of magnitude more smoothly after the first dozen or so bricks of ammo had been through it.

charliehd
June 17, 2009, 11:42 AM
just ordered my 3rd one I always use molybdenum disulfide to slick the workings of any new gun it works especialy well on the 39a it works its way into the metal many times more lubricating than graphite charliehd

OldWolf
June 17, 2009, 01:04 PM
Charliehd, what brand of molybdenum disulfide grease did you use?

mainmech48
June 17, 2009, 02:03 PM
OldWolf: Don't know what Charlie uses but Beeman's Airguns has a great moly grease product called "Metal-2-Metal" that's wonderful. Stays put and a tiny bit goes a long way. Makes stuff work slicker'n snot on a glass door knob.

Wayne02
June 17, 2009, 03:20 PM
I would prefer to have the 20" barrel instead of the 24" that comes on the new models. Has anyone had a 24" cut down to 20"? If so, how did it turn out? And about how much did it cost?

mainmech48
June 18, 2009, 11:46 AM
The model 39M carbines were produced with a straight-grip butt stock and 20" barrel. I bought mine over 20 years ago, and it does make the 39 into a much handier woods-loafing package, IMO.

They might not be currently in production, but they're fairly common finds at gun shows, in "used" racks at shops and on the various auction sites.

IMO, you oughtta be able to pick up a real nice one for significantly less than it'd cost you for an equally nice 39A and paying a good 'smith for the work.

krs
June 18, 2009, 12:43 PM
I would prefer to have the 20" barrel instead of the 24" that comes on the new models. Has anyone had a 24" cut down to 20"? If so, how did it turn out? And about how much did it cost?


You have that wrong. The 39 traditionally uses a 24" barrel and the shorter barreled models are late coming abortions.

My first Model 39 was a 1922 Star marked first year of the designation that had a 24" full octagon barrel. I sometimes regret having sold that rifle as it was a very early serial number 39, which first appeared in the Marlin catalog in 1922, but someone had drilled and tapped the side of the receiver for four holes - in fact the frontmost hole was in the barrel. Anyway the rifle was spoiled but still drew just over $1000. when it sold. I saw it for sale in GunBroker a couple of years ago, still for a grand and it was the guy I sold it to selling.

The company had been sold and reorganized with new model designations in 1922 otherwise we'd know our rifles today as model 1897.

I now have a 1950 and a 1954 versions both with the superior Ballard rifling that preceded the Marlin "Micro" button rifling of later to current models.

Before 1922 the rifle was the model 1897 - essentially the same but the wood gave the feel of a smaller rifle. Prior to the 1897 were the model 1891 which developed into the 1892, which when redesigned as a breakdown rifle became the 1897.

JohnBT
June 18, 2009, 02:30 PM
"the shorter barreled models are late coming abortions."

Abortions?

Jerk

I love the Mountie and so does anybody with good sense.

charliehd
June 22, 2009, 03:34 PM
Sorry I didn't get back sooner
I have on hand now Moly Paste from Loctite, Gear Moly from Pacific Lubricants, Engine Guard from Kal Guard, Dri-Slide Bike Aid from Valspar
G L 2 Grease w/ Moly from John Deere. Most lubricant companies have some sort of Moly Lube. Its all available, just costs a lil more. My all time favorite
is a fine Moly Powder from Dow Corning. Don't have any right now.

Wouldn't you know it Wally World just called My new 39a is in
Only 500 $$ last one was 229 OK I better go pick it up

Bring it home and M O L Y it

Charliehd

AirForceShooter
June 22, 2009, 03:51 PM
I've had one since 1985
Broke it and Marlin fixed it.
Yes, they can break.
Frankly I don't like it. In general I don't like levers.

AFS

rcmodel
June 22, 2009, 03:55 PM
"the shorter barreled models are late coming abortions."Maybe so. But everybody wants one.
And they kill abortion doctors in Kansas!

They wouldn't be selling for twice what a long barrel 39A is bringing if there were a down-side.

Marlin is foolish for not bringing back the Mountie!

rc

zinzan
July 31, 2009, 11:25 AM
I'm not the best shot in the world, so when I lug several different firearms out shooting I usually get frustrated and want to go home soon after I begin. Since I bought my 39a I feel less like skippy the punk. When I miss with all my other guns, I load up the Marlin and its bullseye city. Marlin gives me warm fuzzies. No scope on mine, want to install a peep sight.

BTDT
August 7, 2009, 10:33 PM
Bought my 39A in 1954 and still have it. My son made me promise to give it to him when I'm through with it. It still looks good with only some very small scratches on it. I don't think I could part with it if someone offered me $1000. I bought it at a Coast to Coast store and paid $49.95 for it. Most of my hunting was done from the tractor seat or on horseback.

quick69
December 28, 2009, 09:34 PM
I can't seem to get the link that is posted earlier to work with my serial #. I would like to find out how old my Marlin Golden 39-A Mountie is. The serial # is as follows: S 18599
This rifle was my grandfathers.
Any help is greatly apprieciated ..:D

chuck williams
January 19, 2010, 10:26 PM
Hey guys i have a model 39a 22 long rifle. My dad is 60 and he got it when he was 14 and it was used then. Never missfired jammed or give a minuits trouble. Its in really good shape. Any ideas what it might be worth?

MP-44
January 24, 2010, 07:04 AM
I am getting ready to purchase a new Marlin 39. I see a lot of posts about extraction problems with the new Marlins. Is this just a very small % or is this a serious problem with newly manufactured Marlin 39s?

JustsayMo
January 24, 2010, 08:49 AM
I haven't heard of many extraction problems.. The most frequent issue with the newer rebounding hammer version is light firing pin strikes. It is correctable with minimal grief. I don't know what the percentage is but I would bet there are far more 39 owners are pleased with the 39 than not. They hold their value well and are easy to sell should you decide it isn't for you.

flusher
March 6, 2010, 01:52 PM
Just picked up,a mint used 1978 39A. About the only wear is to the left side of the hammer.Otherwise, perfect.
The issue I have is that the rear folding sight is tilted a little to the rear. Is this normal? If not can it be fixed?

flusher
March 6, 2010, 01:54 PM
I just cancelled my order for a new 39A because of all the discussions on FTF and FTF on other boards
I bought a used 1978 39A instead

MP-44
March 6, 2010, 05:44 PM
I just cancelled my order for a new 39A because of all the discussions on FTF and FTF on other boards
I bought a used 1978 39A instead

I know the feeling. I wanted a new 39A bad but couldn't bring myself to lay down the cash because of all the bad reviews. I ended up buying a nice 1979 39A off GB.

dfariswheel
March 6, 2010, 08:53 PM
Just picked up,a mint used 39A. About the only wear is to the left side of the hammer.Otherwise, perfect.
The issue I have is that the rear folding sight is tilted a little to the rear. Is this normal? If not can it be fixed?

That's normal. The sight blade tilted to the rear eliminates glare on the sight.

sebtool
April 26, 2010, 12:12 PM
I can't seem to get the link that is posted earlier to work with my serial #. I would like to find out how old my Marlin Golden 39-A Mountie is. The serial # is as follows: S 18599
This rifle was my grandfathers.
Any help is greatly apprieciated ..:D
I've got the same problem - entered just the letter, the letter and 1st #, then 1st and
2nd #s, still no response. SN D24434.

It's a fairly old 1, has a finger groove forearm that's supposedly collectible. I dunno about that, but it's a durn good shooter!

Mine's been drilled and tapped on the side of the round barrel as mentioned above. I've been looking for a scope mount for it, as my eyes ain't quite what they used to be. Any ideas on where to find 1? I have a couple of old Weaver scopes I'd like to try on it that would look sharp, but have to fine the mount -help!

mayer813
May 16, 2010, 01:15 AM
I found this site helpful. If it was made before 1906 you use the #s not any letters. From 1948 on you use the letter only.

Marlin Manufacture Dates http://oldguns.net/sn_php/marlinlookup.php s=1958-59-sn d24434 is 1889

Nematocyst
May 16, 2010, 03:31 AM
I just re-found this thread.

Glad to see it's still alive.

Scanned it to find this post (http://thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=3343462&postcount=61) by me a long while ago.

Found several posts along the way that I'll return to shortly,
especially this one by Mo (http://thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=6217318&postcount=122) about light strikes on newer models
with a rebounding hammer that probably relate to my ftf(ire) issue.

Added by edit: Then, there's this statement in this post by RCModel (http://thehighroad.org/showpost.php?p=5701210&postcount=116) that I agree with.

Marlin is foolish for not bringing back the Mountie!Which is why I still plan to get my 39A cut down to somewhere between 16" and 18".

skynyrd1911
October 27, 2010, 09:14 PM
I bought a brand new one in April of 09 and have had nothing but problems and Marlin could not fix it after 3 trips back to the factory. They are refunding my money this time. Wish it were not true, because I dearly love everything about the rifle, but for the amount of $$$ I gave for it it should work almost flawlessly. Mine was either junk or a lemon. As soon as I get my refund I will be on the search for another, but I'm a little hesitant now.

Nematocyst
October 28, 2010, 10:44 PM
Condolences, Skynyrd. :(

Wow, with your attitude, Marlin should just send you a new one, free of charge.

If I was president of Marlin, I sure would.

skynyrd1911
October 29, 2010, 07:55 AM
They told me that they didn't have any new ones to replace mine with...

JustsayMo
October 29, 2010, 11:36 AM
It is my understanding that any NEW Marlins will now be made in Remington's Ilian, New York plant.

I wonder how that will play out and which models/calibers will survive the move. It'll be difficult for me when I spot the first Marlin on the shelf that isn't stamped New Haven.

skynyrd1911
October 29, 2010, 01:11 PM
Whether it be CT, NY or NC, they still couldn't service their own product. :banghead: It sure made me feel bad to ship it off in a Marlin box and it came back in a Remington box. First time it had paperwork with a Marlin letterhead, second time was Remington letterhead, third time was H&R letterhead. ***

gunzee
October 29, 2010, 01:16 PM
I suggest that you call Brownell's Inc, and have them recommend a smith for you. Get it fixed, and if you still don't like it, sell it.

Nar
October 29, 2010, 01:24 PM
It is a very well made rifle, it is the best .22 in my collection and the irons are dead on. probibly one of the best plinkers that one could find (IMO)

skynyrd1911
October 29, 2010, 04:01 PM
I love the rifle if it worked. Too late, I've sent it back and they are going to cut me a check. I'm looking for another as we speak.

JustsayMo
October 29, 2010, 04:04 PM
Skynyrd wrote Whether it be CT, NY or NC, they still couldn't service their own product

Indeed. Conversely I sent a 1965 vintage Marlin 336 back earlier this year and they sent me back a BEAUTIFULLY converted 336 Cowboy in Cal. 38-55. It was the second one I had converted and I have nothing but praise for their workmanship and service. My understanding is that those craftsman no longer work for Marlin/Remington/Freedom Group. :banghead:

http://www.myhostedpics.com/images/Pathfinder/owboys3855and3030.jpg
Marlin 336 Cowboy (conversions) 38-55 and 30-30

A friend of mine sent his 70's vintage 1894CL in 32-20 :eek: last spring, a rifle and caliber LONG out of production with a chamber issue and Marlin replaced the barrel and had it back to him in under a week. He used that to win the next Silhouette match with his seasons best pistol caliber score.

Needless to say, he raved about the excellent service Marlin gave him. :D

I'd be tempted to just get the $ back and find a good used one. I've owned 5 and every one was a good shooter, even the 39TDS with the rebounding hammer. I'd love to find a newer 39 Cowboy but never seem to have the $ when they come up for sale... :o

http://www.myhostedpics.com/images/Pathfinder/three39s.jpg

http://www.myhostedpics.com/images/Pathfinder/39clubbirthdaycard.jpg

teetertotter
October 29, 2010, 06:35 PM
That is sad they are returning your money as have nothing at this time in stock to replace. Mine is 4 years old and at the time had FTE off and on, depending on ammo. For $50.00, our local gunsmith fixed plus the FTF that would happen to frequently. I haven't had an issue since, averaging 500 rds a month, 5 months out of the year, for the past 2 years. Maybe Remmington employees will build with quality in mind?

CoastieShep
October 29, 2010, 09:03 PM
I've got one that my dad bought for me back in 85 when I was just a little kid. After countless thousands of rounds put through it, I've only had one problem, and that was a broken firing pin. The action is slicker than snot, and is more accurate than I am. It is the only gun I own that I will never sell.

HOWARD J
October 29, 2010, 10:26 PM
I got mine from my brother in the early 50's--he got drunk & lost my savage 22/410 in the woods & I demanded he give me his 39---he did.
I love that gun---at the state range we stood cigarettes on end at the 100 yd. range were able to hit them ( 12 power scope)
We don't do that anymore--cigarettes are $6.50/7.00 per pack.
It is my favorite .22 by far........................

fiddleharp
October 30, 2010, 08:43 AM
Love this rifle!
However, unless you're some sort of Old West purist, you've probably got a scope mounted on your 39A. Personally, I wouldn't hunt without one.
Problem is, that aluminum scope mount base is a flimsy afterthought which allows the scope to lose its zero with annoying frequency. The rifle was designed long before scopes came into common use and this was the solution Marlin came up with.
I'd like to see the receiver top changed on future 39A's to create a more solid platform for a scope.

Reaper1974
November 23, 2010, 04:07 PM
I purchased my Golden 39A in 1977. Mine (with 24" barrel) shot unbelievable (hole for hole) with CCI Stinger ammunition. The rifle fit me so well and I knew in so well that shooting a squirrels eye out or drilling spent .22 casings at 100 yards was no challenge what so ever. Unfortunately my home was robbed in 1985 and my "BABY" along with other nice weapons was lost. To this day I would LOVE to have the thieves in my scope!!!!

Reaper1974
November 23, 2010, 04:16 PM
I purchased my Golden 39A in 1977...the 24" barrel was perfect for me and it shot so Unbelievable (hole for hole) with CCI Stinger ammunition. The rifle fit me so well and I knew it so well that shooting a squirrels eye out or drilling spent .22 casings at 100 yards was no challenge what so ever. Unfortunately in 1985 my home was robbed and my "BABY" (along with other fine weapons) were gone forever. To this day I would LOVE to have the thief or thieves in my scope.

With the right shooter behind this rifle, no other rifle can equal it's accuracy!!!!

Reaper1974
November 23, 2010, 04:17 PM
I purchased my Golden 39A in 1977. Mine (with 24" barrel) shot unbelievable (hole for hole) with CCI Stinger ammunition. The rifle fit me so well and I knew in so well that shooting a squirrels eye out or drilling spent .22 casings at 100 yards was no challenge what so ever. Unfortunately my home was robbed in 1985 and my "BABY" along with other nice weapons was lost. To this day I would LOVE to have the thieves in my scope!!!!

skynyrd1911
November 23, 2010, 07:43 PM
A friend wants to sell me his for $460 which is what he paid for it at a gunshow back in Feb. I would rate it at 90% Overall it's pretty slick. It doesn't have the checkering I like so well, but this one works. Going to shoot it this weekend. Also going to a local gunshow this weekend to see what else is out there. If I don't find anything that I like at the gunshow I'll probably buy his. nIt needs the filler screws on top as whoever had it before him must have had a scope on it.

PX15
February 7, 2011, 11:31 AM
JMOfartO:

Well, since it seems this thread has a longer life expectancy than Dracula I'll add my old farts 2c worth.

I'm new to the Marlin 39A, but I have two now, (1996 39A/1970 CL) and I love 'em both...

Fantastic rifles..

the action on my full size 1996 39A is not as "slick" as that of the 1970 "gussied up" Mountie, but it IS a "tack driver".. :D

Jesse

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a73/Laserlips/100_2349.jpg

Hanshi
February 7, 2011, 01:29 PM
I've had my Marlin Golden 39A for nearly 49 years. It was and is the finest lever .22 on the market IMHO. The new ones are a little different but even a bit prettier than those from a half century ago. Mine still maintains it's match accuracy. I do believe in the claim "The cadillac of .22s". Their cost these days is very high. I think they are still a good buy.

Morrell
February 13, 2011, 12:28 PM
I'm looking to get a new 39a and am somewhat worried about reports of the new ones. Has the quality gone down hill? I don't want to buy a lemon. And yes, I'm glad to hear about all these old ones that work wonderfully, but please only tell me about new ones

skynyrd1911
February 13, 2011, 12:36 PM
I hate to say this, but in my opinion the new ones are pretty as heck and I had a BAD experience with mine and would not recommend a new one to anyone. I was at a GunShow in Little Rock yesterday and there was a used newer model like the new one I bought and they were asking $499 for it. Wouldn't mind taking the wood off a new one and putting it on my 1981 model. If you buy a new one I will pray for you!:D

Morrell
February 13, 2011, 12:41 PM
What was wrong with yours?

skynyrd1911
February 13, 2011, 12:49 PM
failure to extract mainly. sent to factory 3 times. 4th time they said they would either replace it or give me a refund. 3 days later they call and say they didn't have any to replace it with, so I got a refund check for the purchase price MINUS sales tax. Took that money and bought me a good used one.

PX15
February 13, 2011, 12:56 PM
Morrell:

I don't have a clue as to the quality of the new 39's, and I only have the experience of the two I recently bought.

I would suggest you go to the dedicated Marlin owners forum (www.marlinowners.com) and ask the question there.

I did that, and from what I read from those folks who should know..

The new 39A's have a different extractor than the old ones, and apparently it's not as good as the older ones. You CAN still buy the old extractors (Wisner) and retrofit them to a new 39A if you need to. In fact I bought one with that in mind, but my 1996 isn't having enough problems for me to go to the trouble, so I've just put the replacement up until I might need it.

The newer 39A's have the "rebounding hammer" and "crossblock safety" that did not come on the older ones, and it seems to be the general consensus on the Marlin owners forum that the earlier ones are "smoother" than the new ones.

I would say "dedicated" 39A's fans prefer the models manufactured prior to the changes in the extractor, hammer, and safety.

I will also say my 1970 Model 39 (pre-changes) is light years "smoother" than the action of my 1996 39A, but as I mentioned in another post I don't think my 39A has been shot much, and I expect the less than smooth action to smooth out with use.

I have read where that is often the case.

I have also read where the ACCURACY of the new 39A's has not been compromised and the new ones maintain the standard of outstanding accuracy that the Marlin 39A's have had the reputation for.

My 1996 is absolutely more accurate than any rimfire rifle I've ever owned or shot and even tho the action is not "glasslike smooth" I wouldn't get rid of it for anything.

If you start shopping around I think you'll find OLDER ones in good condition command almost as much as new ones..

But, I'm just repeating what I read on the various rimfire forums, and I could be mistaken.

I love my 1996 39A so well that I'm always on the hunt for another one. If another one pops up I would prefer one "pre-changes", but I'd buy a newer one in a heartbeat if the price were right.

Hope this helps,

Best Wishes,

Jesse

Morrell
February 13, 2011, 01:32 PM
Thanks for the link to the Maroon forum. Hadn't seen it before. Was looking at the Henry h001t but seems most folks like the 39a more.

Wayne02
February 13, 2011, 01:44 PM
I'm looking to get a new 39a and am somewhat worried about reports of the new ones. Has the quality gone down hill? I don't want to buy a lemon.

In my opinion, yes, the quality has gone Way downhill.

My wife was kind enough to buy me a new manufactured 39a as a gift a year or two ago. As you all know this is an expensive rifle at $550. She bought the rifle from one of the local gun shops.

While I obviously greatly appreciate such a gift, the fact is this rifle looked and functioned like it was manufactured by a 12 year old. I had to take it back to the gunsmith at the gun shop for work twice, and finally I had to perform work on it myself with the help of the Marlin forum to finally get it running. The second time I brought the rifle back the gunsmith admitted that many of the new Marlins had been problematic. To put it mildly, I'm disgusted with the quality and workmanship of this rifle. The thing has sat in the back of my safe for a year now until I can cool off and use it again, or somehow sell it (though being a gift from wife this is difficult).

I find it ironic that this is so called American quality. The marlin box says, 'proudly made by American craftsman'. If that's the case, it's no wonder American manufacturing has been dwindling over these years.

If you get a new one and it turns out not to work, sign-up on the Marlin forum and those kind folks will help you get it running correctly. Or you can play the 'send it back to the factory' game and hope it works when you finally get it back.

I've been around guns for 40 years now and I realize that an occasional lemon is made, and that right or wrong many guns need tweaking to run optimally. But this poor excuse for manufacturing has really set me off. It is absolutely unacceptable.

Joe in fla
February 13, 2011, 07:11 PM
I have a Marlin '97 (the predecessor of the model 39). Mine was made in about 1912 and the rifling is almost completely gone but it's still accurate and it's one of my favorite shooters. In fact, I like it better than my BLR 22 and 9422. I wouldn't hesitate to buy another if I could find one that didn't have a "collector" price!

Picher
December 23, 2013, 06:05 AM
I also have a newer rifle, about 6 yrs old. I've had several problems including: 1. Iron sights not on top dead center; 2. Failure to extract fired cases; 3. Rough bore; 4. Misaligned drilled/tapped receiver holes; 5. Misfires; 6. Poor accuracy. I noticed that the crown was very rough.

Item#s I corrected: #2. Honed the extractor angle and filed the barrel slot to better allow extraction; #3. Bore has gotten smoother with use; #4. Made a slot in the one-piece base, so the base could be aligned with the bore. Also, used High-Strength Locktite under the base to prevent shifting; #5. Re-shaped the firing pin nose, which was too blunt and hit high on the rim; #6. Used an 11 degree target crowning tool to improve the crown...just deep enough to make a clean, sharp edge. Accuracy is now excellent.

I didn't dare send the rifle to the factory for repairs due to other people's horror stories and Marlin's admitted lever-action woes in the last few years. Hopefully, they're getting better.

vpc
December 23, 2013, 07:13 AM
I bought my 39 Golden A over 40 years ago and have never found a harder hitting .22LR . Shooting several times with other guys back then at old cars for back stop,using same box of ammo,the 39A marlin would go through both doors,back then (1970's old cars 1950's & older) Why not the other guns ? I figured it had to be the micro grooves, didn't let as much gas escape and pushed all the way out the barrel.
The same for distance,sighted in at 35-40 yds it seemed to still be on good enough to stick it in a squirrel's ear.
Only problem it weights as much as a M14 :-) Unlike the 10/22 Chief AJ at the back door.I never dreamed .22 ammo would ever be scarce.
Never thought of ever selling the Marlin !!

DAdams
December 23, 2013, 11:22 PM
My first
http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/dadams111/Long%20Guns/image_zps456c6bff.jpg (http://s100.photobucket.com/user/dadams111/media/Long%20Guns/image_zps456c6bff.jpg.html)


My second.
http://i100.photobucket.com/albums/m22/dadams111/Long%20Guns/image_zpsa3b22fae.jpg (http://s100.photobucket.com/user/dadams111/media/Long%20Guns/image_zpsa3b22fae.jpg.html)

Art Eatman
December 24, 2013, 12:09 AM
The OP's question was answered years ago.

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