Iraq report on Militec gun lube products


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Preacherman
March 7, 2006, 05:57 PM
The following was received via the API List, and is reproduced here with permission from the original poster there. I thought our members might find it interesting.

The author of the report is a Sergeant in the USMC.

Regarding Militech and its use in Iraq March 2005-Feb 2006

I would like to voice a few comments I have about the firearms product "Militech-1" by Militech, Inc. Waldorf MD. (http://www.militec-1.com/). I used the product during all the climates and conditions in Iraq on almost the complete suite of weapons available to USMC infantry and foreign weapons. It was on all my weapons in urban, desert, farmland, river environments. I used it in the rain, sleet, cold weather, hot weather, dry dusty conditions, you name it. I never had a malfunction on a weapon with Militech on the range or in gunfights. I use Militech on the following weapons:

U.S.:

M2 .50cal
M4A3
M240B, G
M249
M16A4
M9
M14

Foreign:
AK-47
RPK
RPD lmg
PKC mmg
Dragonov SVD

The Militech performed flawlessly in all applications. Not only did it increase the reliability of the weapon systems I was using, it greatly decreased the cleaning and maintenance time required. I will continue to use it on all of my personal weapons, and recommend this product for anyone with a firearm.

Application:

I was very particular about the way I applied the Militech on my weapons. First I would thoroughly clean the weapon and degrease any old lube on the parts. Important areas to focus on are heavy carbon build up areas like inside the gas pistons on a machine gun. You must get the residue off the parts before you apply the Militech as the product needs to be in contact with the base metal. Next I would take the weapon to the range and totally soak any moving part with Militech before firing. I would then "cook" the Militech onto the parts by getting the metal as hot as possible. This normally means about 400rds on a belt fed gun, a full combat load (189rds) through a rifle, or 100rds or so through a pistol. I would shoot this ammunition at the cyclic rate, one magazine after another until it is gone. Then I let the weapon cool to the air temperature on its own. Last I cleaned the weapon by wiping it down. I don't use any solvent or lube after a militech application.

Use:

After you apply the product correctly, the metal will have a silky feel to it. Any residue from shooting will wipe off quite easily. This makes daily cleaning of weapons in a combat zone just a matter of wiping the bolt down with a dry rage and running a dry patch through the bore. Of course after a lot of rounds, I will always clean the bore in the normal way (Hoppes #9 and a patch). I only reapplied the Militech 3 times over the course of a year and I am comfortable with it on this schedule. For a personal weapon, one a year is probably sufficient if you cook it on well. This product is particularly helpful in dusty conditions like the desert in summertime. The windborne dust doesnâ??t stick to the weapons with Militech to the same, annoying degree as a gun cleaned with CLP or LSA. I believe you could dump an entire sandbag into a well Militeched M2 .50BMG receiver and it would still sing to you. (Not that you would want to!)

The one problem I have with Militech is that their product information doesn't emphasize proper use very well. (The problem is not Militech, Inc's it is the user, I know) I saw lots of guys in Iraq using Militech as a wet lube in place of CLP. Militech seemed to thicken up as it cooled and I would not trust it as a wet lube, especially in a combat zone. The product packaging should scream "READ THE INSTRUCTIONS TWICE BEFORE USE!!!" It might cause some problems for those who can't read or who know everything, but otherwise it is a wonderful product. I appreciated having this stuff with me in Iraq and the Militech company made sure that there is a large supply of Militech floating around over there so thanks to them for that and a thanks for a great firearm product. This stuff will be in my cleaning kit from now on.

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MartinS
March 7, 2006, 08:53 PM
Very interesting, thanks. Just mixed up a quart of Ed's Red with Mobil ATF but I do not argue with Devil Dogs.

Ryder
March 7, 2006, 11:15 PM
I used it a couple times without complaint. Then my sample evaporated out of the bottle somehow. Beats me where it went? I asked the kid... He knows nothing. Thinking of renaming him Schultz.

'Card
March 7, 2006, 11:49 PM
Sounds like Slick 50 for guns.

proud2deviate
March 8, 2006, 01:14 AM
Militech comes very highly recomended for lubing the pivots in balisongs (butterfly knives.) Most people bake it on with a hair dryer or heat gun. Heat is apparently essential to the application process.

Soybomb
March 8, 2006, 01:15 AM
Sounds like Slick 50 for guns.
Thats what I think too. Although I'm sure snake oil is an excellent lubricant :D

gudel
March 8, 2006, 01:17 AM
Sounds like Slick 50 for guns.

I agree. Baking is for bread, not guns.

mons meg
March 8, 2006, 07:51 AM
Interesting, but maybe not practical for *most* people in a combat zone to worry about baking on a lube with a few hundred rounds at the range. Maybe unit armorers and supply pogies... ;)

I've said it before, in dusty dry conditions CLP works fine as a dry lube if you apply a light coat to the appropriate parts per your M16A2 operator's manual. Is Militech a superior dry lube? Probably, if you follow the manufacturer's instructions. But look at your user base. It's much easier for squad/platoon leaders to make sure individual soldiers or Marines aren't glopping the CLP on than to rotate all their weapons through "bake-on" procedures. Unless, of course, your bake-on is built into your daily patrol in a hot zone.

chopinbloc
March 8, 2006, 08:30 AM
we have been unable to get militech issued where i'm at in afghanistan but a user on this forum told me the company will send a free "sample" to troops deployed OCUNUS. well, they do but it's not exactly a sample, they sent me about an eight ounce bottle of the stuff. i concur with the fact that it can often be difficult to get range time to cook in the stuff but what we did was just glop it on and leave the weapon in the sun. the stuff works well but my bottle walked after the first time i used it.:scrutiny: anyway, congrats to militech and i'll definitely support them by purchasing their products in the future.

joebogey
March 8, 2006, 08:50 AM
I use it on and in my guns as well as in my 01 Silverado truck and my wife's car.
My truck had a habit of jerking when shifting, but after one dose of Miltec it straightened right up.

I use the wife's hair dryer to heat it after it's applied to my guns.

cracked butt
March 8, 2006, 09:14 AM
I like militec stuff, especially the grease for my Garand. I'll have to give the oil a second look, I never really used it because it smells so bad.

usp9
March 8, 2006, 10:43 AM
I use it, like it, and recommend it. Definitely makes clean up easier.

ball3006
March 8, 2006, 11:46 AM
for several years now. The grease is the best I have ever used. The lube is first rate too. However, I cannot shoot enough to "bake" it in as the article says..........Militec and LPS.....my favorites.....chris3

444
March 8, 2006, 01:49 PM
-I have used their oil and found it worked fine. My uses are not demanding enough to know if it is better than anything else or not.

What is the source of this article ? I know it says the guy is an sergent in the USMC, but is this guy known to you personally or is this just something making the rounds on the internet ? Or is it taken from a sales website ?
Just curious, since so many of these articles make the rounds that are reported to be from some soldier in Iraq.
As a side note, I have never read one of these articles reported to be from a soldier in Afganistan or anywhere other than Iraq.

'Card
March 8, 2006, 02:10 PM
The sergeant says "You must get the residue off the parts before you apply the Militech as the product needs to be in contact with the base metal."

I wonder if having a rifle that had been parkerized would interfere with that bonding process? I would assume it doesn't, simply because I think the military still parkerizes (or a similar treatment) most of its weapons, but the line did sort of jump out at me.

Preacherman
March 8, 2006, 02:14 PM
444, the API List is not the place where one finds junk information being circulated. In this case, the author, a USMC sergeant, was personally known to a member of the List, and did an after-action report at his request for List members. I reckon it's as good as gold.

444
March 8, 2006, 02:56 PM
Ok, you got it off the API list. That is all I was asking.
I quit subscribing to it some time back, so I missed it.

Don't Tread On Me
March 8, 2006, 03:14 PM
Militec is fine as a lubricant, but that's about it.

I've done my own salt-spray corrosion test, and using Militec is just a tiny bit better than using nothing.

Of all the oils and other things I tested, only CLP defeated the rusting process. And did so with amazing results. Stuff really does work. The big dissapointments were TW-25b and Militec. Even RemOil, Mobil 1 synthetic, Outers oil (that clear stuff) and WD-40 did better....

Guys in Iraq don't have to worry too much about humidity and corrorsion I bet. Seems like Militec is nothing more than the heat-activated additives found in quality synthetic motor oils. Penetrates metal and makes the surfaces slicker.

444
March 8, 2006, 05:18 PM
I have no sophisticated testing process, but I do have a couple personal observations.

I have been using TW-25 based upon the recomendation of Gunsite. In fact, I bought the two tubes I have of it at the Gunsite Pro-Shop. During the two carbine classes I took at Gunsite, they passed out sample tubes of TW-25. They said that in their experience (which is considerable) in the hot/super hot desert climate of Arizona, it proved to be the best lubricant they had tried. I have taken two carbine classes at Gunsite as well as three carbine classes at Frontsight (far hotter than Gunsite). I am starting to question the use of TW-25 grease in colder weather. It seemed to work fine for me during these real hot classes, but over the past several months I have had some problems. About half way through the training day, I started getting malfunctions. When I looked at my bolt, it was covered in real heavy sludge. I never had that happen before. So, I am looking for something new to try. I do have a small bottle of Miltech and have used it, and don't have anything to report on it.
FWIW, in formal classes (500 or more rounds/day) I have used all manner of lubes from regular petroleum based oils to highly touted stuff. Never had a problem in hot weather with any of them.
I have been thinking about just going back to Breakfree. It has always worked for me.

444
March 8, 2006, 05:53 PM
I went to the miltec website. They had a copy of this Iraq equipment report that I am sure everyone here read a dozen times over the last couple years. http://www.militec-1.com/OperationIraqiFreedom.pdf
Here is what it said about lube:
Lubricant: Soldiers provided consistent comments that CLP was not a good choice for weapon's maintenance in this environment. The sand is a fine as talcum powder here. The CLP attracted the sand to the weapon. Soldiers considered a product called Militec to be a much better solution for lubricating individual and crew-served weapons.


A totally unrelated comment in this same report that caught my eye:
M4: Soldier's were very satisfied with this weapon. It performed well in a demanding environment......................................The M4 with PEQ and PAC provided overmatch over our threat equipped with AK47s and RPGs.

Instead of interviewing soldiers deployed in a combat area about weapons, they should have interviewed the internet commandos and got the real story.

Don't Tread On Me
March 8, 2006, 06:56 PM
I have been using TW-25 based upon the recomendation of Gunsite. In fact, I bought the two tubes I have of it at the Gunsite Pro-Shop. During the two carbine classes I took at Gunsite, they passed out sample tubes of TW-25. They said that in their experience (which is considerable) in the hot/super hot desert climate of Arizona, it proved to be the best lubricant they had tried. I have taken two carbine classes at Gunsite as well as three carbine classes at Frontsight (far hotter than Gunsite). I am starting to question the use of TW-25 grease in colder weather. It seemed to work fine for me during these real hot classes, but over the past several months I have had some problems. About half way through the training day, I started getting malfunctions. When I looked at my bolt, it was covered in real heavy sludge. I never had that happen before. So, I am looking for something new to try.


TW-25b is pure GARBAGE. I don't care what Gunsite thinks about it. For them to push a product like that makes me suspect their expertise.

I used to use TW-25b on my pistol. I never had a problem really, it lubricated well, and it did minimize wear. Whenever I'd shoot, I'd clean my firearms immediately after. I would reapply it, and my pistol would usually stay inside my house for a month before I would go to the range again.

A family member of mine used this on his pistol. I gave him a tube to use. He doesn't shoot as often as I do. He cleaned his firearm (a 1911) and applied the TW-25b. He keeps this particular pistol in his trunk. Note, this is Florida, trunks can get up to 140 degrees easily, and it is very humid. After 1 month, not a day more, he took out his 1911, tried to cycle it, and it was gummed up beyond belief.


The TW-25b turned into muck. It hardened and dried up. It was like a thin layer of caulking...kind of rubbery. If you've ever taken off an old CPU from a computer's motherboard, and saw the old, sticky, hard heatsink paste...that's exactly what it was like. It took a wirebrush and a couple of hours to get it all out. I was shocked when I heard this, and when I saw it, I was quite disappointed.


He didn't apply too much, or too little. If anything, I apply much more to my pistol (HK USP) and never had this happen. The key difference, is that my firearm was kept indoors where it is cool and there is low humidity. His was not fired once, but was kept in a quality lined gun case, in his trunk.


For me, TW-25b has failed the ultimate test. It has failed to even remain a lubricant. It actually is worse than other lubes that dry up, at least those vanish, this became a caulk-like deposit on the internals. When I saw his firearm, I took mine out, blasted it with brake-cleaner, got it spotless, then applied CLP and have never looked back.

I still have a tube and a half left. Been keeping it around incase I need to ever lube something not-important. What a waste of $.

444
March 8, 2006, 07:35 PM
Please don't take this the wrong way. I am not trying to draw any conclusions about you or your friend. This is just a harmless discussion of gun lubricants.
But..................
I have used TW-25 on guns in hot weather. I have used it on AR15s, shooting from dawn until dusk with temperature highs of over 110 degrees not including the heat generated by firing the weapon. I never had a problem with TW-25 in hot weather. The instructors at Gunsite see hundreds, if not thousands of carbines come through their classes annually, all of which fire about 2000 rounds/week. In addition, the Gunsite instructors I am talking about have mucho experience elsewhere. Just to name a few of the instructors I had in these two classes were Pat Rogers, Louis Awerbuck, and Jeff Gonzales. Forget Gunsite, these guys are in daily contact with elite military units, all have been in combat in various wars etc. You will never hear me saying that I don't care what they say.
Even you yourself have never had a problem with this lube.
But, a friend of yours had a problem which he told you was related to TW-25 and now you announce on a worldwide forum that it is junk ?


One thing that I should add to my previous post is that I am now using a suppressor which fouls the weapon many times worse than firing the weapon without it. I am sure it plays a significant role in the malfunctions.

Don't Tread On Me
March 8, 2006, 07:55 PM
I never had a problem with it when applied fresh and when in use. He wasn't a friend, he was family, and I personally handled and helped clean this gummed up firearm. This stuff is bad-news if you intend on storing a firearm in a hot environment for a month. If you clean your firearm, apply this stuff, shoot it (like I did, for 300+ rounds pistol) and then clean, no problem. However, I wouldn't store a firearm with it anymore.


YMMV.

Wags
March 8, 2006, 08:26 PM
I use it on all my auto's including my Auto-5. It works great but not the greatest for a rust inhibitor.

mrmeval
March 8, 2006, 09:05 PM
Looks like buzz to me.

Poor rust prevention
http://www.thegunzone.com/rust.html

Read past the howling pro-miltech propaganda to what follows.;
http://www.defensereview.com/article377.html

"Dust tests with exposure times of one hour, three hours, six hours, seven hours and eight hours were conducted with military and commercially available lubricants applied to M16A1 rifles. CLP provided the best overall performance with one stoppage in five dust tests. VV-L-800 finished second with three stoppages in five dust tests. Other top finishers were Brand D with three stoppages in four dusts tests, Brand C with seven stoppages in five dust tests and Brand E (Militec) with eight stoppages in five dust tests. The three top finishers were liquid lubricants. Although it appeared that more dust accumulated on the exposed exterior surfaces of bolt carriers with liquid lubricants than on bolt carriers with dry film lubricants, the liquid lubricants had more success overcoming friction caused by dust intrusion.

XLMiguel
March 8, 2006, 09:20 PM
My former neighbor, who was in the Secret Service, turned me on to this stuff a while back.

Whenever I buy a new (or new to me) gun, the first thing I do is clean it thoroughly and give it a good once-over with MilTec-1 - that is, all lube points and swab the bore and chamber well. IME, it seems to simplify break-in, and it absolutely helps cleaning. It seems to soothe all steel, alloy/steel, stainless, polymer, whatever - they just motor well. Slick-50 for guns (at least in concept), is a good analogy.

I'm a hobbyist /duffer who just likes handguns- I carry when it suits me and I have no real 'hard use' handguns, but I do have several with a couple of thousand rounds thru that look barely worn, FWIW.

I've also used it on a couple of knives, seems to compare to Sentry Solutions lube for day-to-day maintenence.

YMMV

'Card
March 8, 2006, 10:16 PM
OK, maybe I'm misunderstanding all of this... could someone clear it up for me?

It sounds to me like the intended purpose of this stuff (when properly applied - pour on and EZ-Bake oven and everything) is to treat the metal of the gun, make it (for lack of a better term) 'slicker', more rust resistant, and easier to clean, right?

So once you apply this stuff, are you not supposed to use any lubricant (CLP, for example) at all? Or can it be used in conjunction with a normal cleaning/lubricating oil? Seems to me like this stuff would work best when used to make your standard cleaning procedures easier and more effective, but everyone seems to be referring to it as an alternative to regular cleaning and lubricating with CLP.

Brian Dale
March 8, 2006, 10:42 PM
'Card, it is a lubricant. When used according to directions, it seems to make the next cleanup easier than the Remington, Outers or what-have-you gun oils I've used previously. Others will know more about this than I.

I've been very pleased with the performance of Militec-1 on my M1s over the past few months. I don't have the extensive data set that others of you have collected. I coated all of the metal parts and fired the rifle a lot, as many have described. Works great, and the carbon seems to come off from the gas piston quite nicely when I clean it.

I have noticed something I didn't expect in cold weather with Militec GREASE in an M1, as follows.

Late last fall, I applied Militec GREASE in the same way I'd been taught to use Lubriplate or Plastilube: I glopped it on around several spots on the bolt and at the other places on the rifle that are indicated in various tech and field manuals. I used lots of grease. This is normal. However, note that the manuals clearly specify running the weapon in "dry" condition (no grease) during "very cold weather."

This is Wisconsin, and the M1's a WWII and Korean veteran. Around here, "very cold weather" begins somewhere below zero Fahrenheit. I figured that the same would be true for this rifle.

I had several failures to feed while firing in air temperatures right at freezing. The failures were consistent with what I expect to see if the bolt's travel is slowed during its cycle. The Militec Grease was noticeably more viscous -- it felt thicker -- than when I'd fired at air temps in the 50s and 60s Fahrenheit.

I cleaned most of the Militec-1 grease from the rifle, used a very small amount of Lubriplate and it functioned flawlessly again.

My point is simply to suggest that, with Militec GREASE on an M1 rifle, "very cold temperatures" begin at around freezing.

Not a complaint, just a data point.

'Card
March 8, 2006, 11:00 PM
Cold weather performace is a big deal for me, though.

I mean, range time is nice and everything, but for a lubricant to be effective for me it has to work when it counts, and when it counts most for me is in late November or early December, high up in the Appalachian mountains, when the snow is a foot deep and a nice buck just blasted his way out of a laurel thicket cruising along at about Mach 4.

So you feel like treating a rifle with Militec-1, and then using a more common product like CLP as the daily lubricating/cleaning agent would be a better solution?

Brian Dale
March 8, 2006, 11:10 PM
Sorry, 'Card, I probably didn't make the distinction clear in my post. Militec-1 lubricant is not the same thing as the Militec Grease that I over-lubed my M1 with (for the cold conditions). In that rifle, with a known bolt-travel issue -- known for six decades or more -- I needed to lighten up on the Grease.

I think that it's an M1 issue, not a Militec issue, and the Militec-1 oil that people are writing about through most of this discussion is a different product than the grease from the same company. They sent me a tube of each last fall when I requested them. Good stuff.

The Militec-1 oil that I use all over the rifle to protect it seems to be doing a marvelous job. Works great on all of the other weapons, too.

'Card
March 8, 2006, 11:24 PM
I understood. I just had the impression that you were using the grease as a 'routine lubricant' after having treated the rifle with the other, non-grease stuff. :)

Thanks for the info, though. This is a pretty interesting topic to me.

mons meg
March 9, 2006, 07:44 AM
Instead of interviewing soldiers deployed in a combat area about weapons, they should have interviewed the internet commandos and got the real story.

My comments about CLP were based on my experiences in Kuwait '91. Sand wasn't that big of a problem since we took common sense measures: light coats of CLP allowed to dry, dust cover closed, muzzle cap, black pantyhose on occasion to cover other parts. Plus, the pantyhose feels so nice against your skin... :neener:


Again, I'm sure that Militech is wonderful when properly employed. I'm just saying *my* M16 and M60 didn't become a dust magnet from *my* use of CLP. Tht being said, no matter what you do, you gotta do a quick swab of that chamber with a Q-tip to make sure no big grains of sand snuck in there. Doesn't matter what lube you use. Kilo-two-echo out...

(444, don't take my quote as offense against your comment. I feel what you're saying. :) )

Master Blaster
March 9, 2006, 09:23 AM
Every grease out there that I have seen is primarily composed of lithium soap then there are additives like molydisulfide, graphite, and lots of other exotic and secret stuff.

Grease is designed to function in a sealed environment, its designed to lubricate areas that acheive a high temperature without boiling or running out, think sealed applications like grease fittings bearings etc.

When you use grease outside of a sealed environment, it picks up moisture because lithium soap is hydroscopic. It picks up dirt and grit and and holds it.
Grease also thickens when it gets cold.

Those properties make any grease much less than ideal for use on a firearm IMHO.

Brian Dale
March 9, 2006, 03:42 PM
Less than ideal? I agree absolutely.

The best available option for some applications (such as the specified lubrication points on M1 rifles in moderate temperates; 1911 rails; some others)...I think so.

That's why engineers have designed a lot of current weapons not to need grease.

Arc-Lite
March 9, 2006, 04:59 PM
I have used MiliTec for a few years plus....BUT read the directions.... remove all plastic etc. parts, place the metal parts in a black plastic bag, and place in the sun, for a few hours..... then apply the MiliTec...or use a hair drier to heat the metal....and then apply. Log onto their web site, and they will send you some FREE...for the asking...try it out....then decide for yourself. ( Thanks SunDance)

Rockstar
March 9, 2006, 07:02 PM
Unless you're operating in environments colder than -58*F or so, you'll find that Mobil 1 will flow and lube any weapon you own as well or better than any other product on the market. One caveat about Mobil 1, though: If you're operating in a temperature greater than 450*F or so it might begin to bubble and thin out a little.

georgeduz
March 9, 2006, 07:27 PM
no one carries that many weapons he is full of bull,just a spammers and his add.

GruntII
March 9, 2006, 07:33 PM
TW-25b is pure GARBAGE. I don't care what Gunsite thinks about it. For them to push a product like that makes me suspect their expertise.

I used to use TW-25b on my pistol. I never had a problem really, it lubricated well, and it did minimize wear. Whenever I'd shoot, I'd clean my firearms immediately after. I would reapply it, and my pistol would usually stay inside my house for a month before I would go to the range again.

A family member of mine used this on his pistol. I gave him a tube to use. He doesn't shoot as often as I do. He cleaned his firearm (a 1911) and applied the TW-25b. He keeps this particular pistol in his trunk. Note, this is Florida, trunks can get up to 140 degrees easily, and it is very humid. After 1 month, not a day more, he took out his 1911, tried to cycle it, and it was gummed up beyond belief.


The TW-25b turned into muck. It hardened and dried up. It was like a thin layer of caulking...kind of rubbery. If you've ever taken off an old CPU from a computer's motherboard, and saw the old, sticky, hard heatsink paste...that's exactly what it was like. It took a wirebrush and a couple of hours to get it all out. I was shocked when I heard this, and when I saw it, I was quite disappointed.


He didn't apply too much, or too little. If anything, I apply much more to my pistol (HK USP) and never had this happen. The key difference, is that my firearm was kept indoors where it is cool and there is low humidity. His was not fired once, but was kept in a quality lined gun case, in his trunk.


For me, TW-25b has failed the ultimate test. It has failed to even remain a lubricant. It actually is worse than other lubes that dry up, at least those vanish, this became a caulk-like deposit on the internals. When I saw his firearm, I took mine out, blasted it with brake-cleaner, got it spotless, then applied CLP and have never looked back.

I still have a tube and a half left. Been keeping it around incase I need to ever lube something not-important. What a waste of $.




I use TW-25B cleaner/degreaser, oil, and grease as my primary gun care products. I live in central alabama wher ei get high humidity,and high temps for my trunk gun. Not to mention the problem the heat causes for my sweating on the gun. If used properly this is the best stuff going in my experience. During the winter I use the oil not the grease. I have had zero problems with this stuff. I am very exacting in how I take care of my weapons and wouldn't use garbage. In the field I use an otis kit with the otis clp, everywhere else i use the TW-25B. As to the "salt" test conducted by the member above I am aware of several such informal tests that had the exact opposite results with TW-25B working well for surface protection. To each his own I can find cases of every oil/grease/cleaner failing.
I also use the TW-25B products on my duty weapon year round , I go in and out of high heat, high humidity arears to cool, low humidity areas several times a day as well as often having to go out in the rain and my duty weapon has yet to show any signs of corrosion or lube failure.

mrmeval
March 10, 2006, 08:13 AM
From http://www.1927A1.com

http://home.ptd.net/~wolfen/thompson/oillube.htm

This makes sense and is how I've used CLP.

Pity pure ptfe can't be easily bonded in one simple step.
http://pslc.ws/mactest/ptfeidea.htm

dleong
March 10, 2006, 09:13 AM
Unless you're operating in environments colder than -58*F or so, you'll find that Mobil 1 will flow and lube any weapon you own as well or better than any other product on the market. One caveat about Mobil 1, though: If you're operating in a temperature greater than 450*F or so it might begin to bubble and thin out a little.
I wholeheartedly agree. I've been using a 50/50 mixture of Mobil 1 15W-50 and synthetic ATF to lubricate all of my firearms since Day 1, and have yet to experience any kind of lubrication-related failure.

(And since I don't foresee myself using any of my firearms on the surface of Mercury, I don't think I have to worry about the lubrication bubbling and thinning out. ;) )

Thin Black Line
March 10, 2006, 09:16 AM
+1 on militec in Iraq. A complimentary case was given to us as we
deployed and our supply sgt had no problem getting more in theater.

Now that I'm home, I treat it like liquid platinum....

roo_ster
March 10, 2006, 10:37 AM
Interesting info in the original post, though I doubt I'll switch from CLP on my "social" firearms.

All my milsurps get Ed's Red to clean and Mobil 1 to lube & protect. If I tried to use pricey products on them, I'd go broke.

444
March 10, 2006, 12:07 PM
"I don't think I have to worry about the lubrication bubbling and thinning out."

That is something that I feel that I have to contend with. I frequently train in an area that is within a easy hour's drive from Death Valley. It isn't unusual for summer temperatures here to be in excess of 110 degrees. So, before the first shot is fired, my black rifle is at 100 degrees. Add the heat of firing, or possibly the increased heat of firing with a suppressor and IMO you need a grease to keep the lube where you need it.
My problem (I think) was using that same grease in the winter. Even though it doesn't get "that" cold here, it still seemed to gum up in the colder (40s) temperature.
As was already mentioned, there are a number of firearms which require grease such as the M1 rifle and the M1A/M14 rifle. The military specifies grease as well as the civilian manufacturers of the semi-auto copies.
Point being, there is definitely a place for grease in firearms lubrication.

"My comments about CLP were based on my experiences in Kuwait '91. Sand wasn't that big of a problem since we took common sense measures:"
I wasn't really talking about the CLP. I was making a smart comment about the M4 carbine which the internet commandos love to bash.

mons meg
March 10, 2006, 07:47 PM
I wasn't really talking about the CLP. I was making a smart comment about the M4 carbine which the internet commandos love to bash.

Cool! I love bashing Internet commandos with an M4! er...wait. ;)

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