Why Isn't the M-1 Carbine the 1st Assault Weapon


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zastros
March 8, 2006, 08:44 PM
I know that the GW44(?) is known as the first assault rifle. But why? The M-1 was select fire (or at least the M-2 was) and used an intermediate caliber shell, with a smaller footprint so to speak. Was it the way the German weapon was constructed, or the firing mechanism? Or something else?

Forgive me if this has already been covered.

zastros

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KriegHund
March 8, 2006, 08:47 PM
The M-2 was select fire, anyways.

I guess the cartridge wasnt intermediate enough.

It was really more of a submachine-gun carbine than a rifle carbine.

Perhaps with a more powerful cartridge and larger magazines it could be considered an assualt rifle.

Jim Watson
March 8, 2006, 08:52 PM
Because we are not Krauts we don't get to make up kewl words like Sturmgewehr.
And because we are nice Americans, we don't assault anybody.

ABTOMAT
March 8, 2006, 09:04 PM
STG44, although I have to give the FG42 its props, even if it was a weird full-power machine rifle (?-never used that description before).

I think the .30 carbine round just wasn't rifley enough. Something else that gets overlooked these days is the layout of the weapon. The M-1/M-2 is very traditional, same with the M-14. The STG44 had a nearly straight stock and a pistol grip, to allow better control for FA/burts.

Don't Tread On Me
March 8, 2006, 09:07 PM
HA! +1 Jim Watson.



.30 carbine doesn't really cut it as an intermediate cartridge, it is a lot closer to a pistol round, than a rifle round.

Hkmp5sd
March 8, 2006, 09:20 PM
Because Hitler is the one that coined the term "assault rifle" and he did so in calling the STG44 a Sturmgewehr.

Jim K
March 8, 2006, 09:21 PM
FWIW, the German "sturmgewehr" was reportedly coined by old Adolf himself, he being big on assaulting people as long as he didn't personally get his hands dirty. Actually, "sturm" would probably be better translated in this case as "attack."

In the U.S., the term "assault rifle" was rarely used until arms dealers started to import Chinese made semi-auto AK-47's and wanted a catchy term for advertising. They didn't care about the American meaning of "assault" as a criminal act, the implications of the term, or how the term would be used against us, they only cared about making money. Of course they handed the anti-gun gang (who never thought of the term) the biggest club and propaganda tool in decades.

But they retired rich.

Jim

Burt Blade
March 8, 2006, 10:06 PM
The M-1 Carbine fires what is essentially a pistol round. If that gun counted as an "assault rifle", so would the 1928 Thompson and other submachineguns.

It tends to lack the effective range of a true "assault rifle".

robvious
March 8, 2006, 10:25 PM
IMO - If Ruger makes a single action revolver chambered in the cartridge,
it doesn't qualify as a 'assault rifle'. :D

Limeyfellow
March 8, 2006, 10:52 PM
Even though the StG44 has the name it can't even be considered as the first assault rifle. For instance the Cei-Rigotti has all the features of an assault rifle (select fire, intermediate cartridge and designed in 1890, and modified in 1900. In 1903 it even used a modern gas system.

The StG44 wasn't even the first assault rifle adopted by a military. That would be the Russian Federov Avtomat in 1916. They just didn't have enough of them in World War 1.

All the Germans did was coin a phrase decades later.

Ridge
March 8, 2006, 11:07 PM
Well let's not forget J.M.B.'s B.A.R. the first of which were select fire.

While the 30-06 isn't really an iterm. cartridge,it shouldn't be over looked.


But while the M-1 and M-2 carbine aren't known for being the most powerful carbine round,it should still get the nod for being our first AR.

pauli
March 9, 2006, 12:32 AM
to me, "assault rifle" means a non traditional layout. the visual cues that tell you "oh, that's an assault rifle." otherwise, it's just a funky battle rifle, or carbine, or machine gun, or machine pistol.

KriegHund
March 9, 2006, 12:36 AM
A modified cheau-cheau in ww1 couldve been the first "Assualt rifle".

Shorter barrel and intermediate cratridge. The gun wouldve sucked (magazine and bolt were horrid) but it wouldve been an AR.

Topgun
March 9, 2006, 09:34 AM
Well, if it ain't an assault rifle, it's sure one helluva "tweener."

:)

"Assault Tweener??"

TexasRifleman
March 9, 2006, 09:38 AM
Well let's not forget J.M.B.'s B.A.R. the first of which were select fire.

While the 30-06 isn't really an iterm. cartridge,it shouldn't be over looked.

I think 24 pounds pushes that puppy a bit outside the "assault rifle" category :evil:

http://homepage.mac.com/jayc67/BAR1.jpg

loadedround
March 9, 2006, 11:07 AM
Lest we forget...the M-1 Carbine was designed to replace the 19911A1 45ACP Pistol for the REMF troops.

USSR
March 9, 2006, 12:57 PM
Lest we forget...the M-1 Carbine was designed to replace the 19911A1 45ACP Pistol for the REMF troops.

Zactly.

Don

Jim Watson
March 9, 2006, 01:04 PM
Yup, but the applications went a bit beyond the intended use.
Some GIs liked the light weight, large magazine capacity, and M2 full auto. Some disliked the lower power.

trbon8r
March 9, 2006, 01:14 PM
I thought the M2, the full auto version of the M1 carbine didn't make it into service until after WW2 and saw action mostly in Korea?

Gordon Fink
March 9, 2006, 01:19 PM
For what itís worth, the BAR is an automatic rifle Ö obviously.

~G. Fink

AJ Dual
March 9, 2006, 01:32 PM
+1 on what ABTOMAT said.
"Assult Rifle" has ergonomic and layout differences, besides the simple criteria of "intermediate cartridge" and "select fire".

I would think that the term "Assult Rifle" would need ALL the following attributes:

- Intermediate rifle cartridge for both magazine capacity/weight, and balisticaly matched for close to moderate range infantry engagments.
- Detachable magazine w/capacity of 20 rounds or more.
- Select fire. Semi automatic or fully automatic. (And/or burst)
- Pistol Grip.
- In-line stock.
- Over all length no greater than 40".
- Weight less than 12 lbs/5 Kg fully loaded. (Not counting accessories)

Other rifles like the M1 Carbine, the SKS, the M14, the G3, the BAR, or the FAL all fail to meet one or more of the criteria. They are all "carbines" or "battle rifles". (Some Assult Rifles like the AR/M-16 family could also be construed as "carbines" as well, but not all "carbines", like the M1, can be considred Assult Rifles.)

Essex County
March 9, 2006, 02:40 PM
I carried the M2 in the sixties and I shure liked it a bunch. And yes, I knew the limitation of the round.........Essex

loadedround
March 9, 2006, 05:01 PM
I carried an M-2 Carbine myself in 62-63 and wish I could have kept it.

Jim K
March 9, 2006, 06:53 PM
"Lest we forget...the M-1 Carbine was designed to replace the 19911A1 45ACP Pistol for the REMF troops."

True to a point. In the pre-war era, pistols were carried by squad leaders and company grade officers (lieutenants and captains), BAR men, assistant BAR men, machinegunners and assistant machinegunners, mortar men, MP's, etc. Most of those were far from being REMF's (call a WWII BAR man that and you better hope he doesn't have his BAR any more).

And, it was a fact of life that most of those issued the pistol were not very proficient in its use. (That is a polite way of saying they couldn't hit the proverbial barn door with the .45.) Since the pistol was mostly for those whose primary duty was not fighting or as a secondary weapon, replacing it with the carbine was thought to provide more usefulness, at the expense of some convenience. Officers of field grade and up continued to carry pistols.

Jim

mordechaianiliewicz
March 9, 2006, 08:22 PM
In terms of the class in question, an assault rifle could not be used at an indoor pistol only range whereas a .30 Carbine can.

A rifle should have bullets going atleast 2000 fps out the bbl frm the barrel.

ETCss Phil McCrackin
March 9, 2006, 08:41 PM
As long as we're talking about what should be known as the "1st assault rifle", I feel I must point out that, according to the usual definition of "assault rifle", the first would be the Federov Avtomat of 1916. This was a select-fire, intermediate cartridge (6.5x50mm Arisaka is pretty intermediate when compared to 7.62x54R after all) weapon which came many years before the concept could be appreciated.

Hkmp5sd
March 9, 2006, 09:00 PM
Another "honorable mention" is the generally unknown (except to the Russians that invaded in 1939 who were quite surprised by it), the Saloranta Malli 26 from Finland. Like the BAR, it fired a full-sized cartridge, in this case the 7.62x54mm, yet was select fire. Entering service in 1925, it used either a 20 round box magazine or a 75-round drum magazine.

buttrap
March 9, 2006, 10:06 PM
I guess if they counted the M-1 they would have to include the 1903-MK1. Not my idea of a 'assault' gun but it was a select fire rifle with the round that the .30 carbine is based on.

geekWithA.45
March 10, 2006, 09:35 AM
Well let's not forget J.M.B.'s B.A.R. the first of which were select fire.

People who consider 30-06 to be "intermediate" scare me. :neener:

KriegHund
March 10, 2006, 10:04 AM
IIRC they still used the M2 up till the end of vietnam.

Good gun, that. Maybe we should re-issue em with new furniture to troops in iraq and afghanistan. I dont know enough about the weapon to say if its a good idea or not, but a hotly loaded .30 round might be preferable to some.

roo_ster
March 10, 2006, 01:05 PM
KH:

I'm sure it could fill a niche, but I think a M4 unencumbered with all the tacti-doo-dads or (even better) an old-school CAR15 with 10" bbl would be nearly as compact & light...with the advantage of a longer-range round.

I must admit, I'd love to own a M1/2 Carbine.

Rifleman 173
August 14, 2007, 11:26 AM
When I was a kid, I had a neighbor who had been in the German military in WW2. He had been a mechanic in the Luftwaffe and at the end of the war had been used in an infantry role in last ditch fighting. When Ted Kennedy, Sarah Brady and the other rabid anti-gunners came out with the phrase 'assault rifle" those Washington losers really made this old German guy mad. He explained that the German people often indulge in word play. For example, the old Katuyshka rockets were called "Stalin Organs" for two reasons. #1. Was because of the loud screeching noise that they made, like an out-of-tune church organ, when they were launched and, #2. Because of what they did to a person who was in the area when the rockets landed. This German man also told me that the real meaning of Sturmgewher had been wrongly translated. The anti-gunners had used a literal translation of sturm for storm/attack and gewher for rifle/device. What the German man told me was that the sturmgewher was a device/rifle to be used AGAINST attacking/storming troops. In other words, because of the cut down cartridge size and the actual intended use of the rifle, it was actually meant to be an ANTI-assault rifle. :banghead: He never could understand how our politicians in Washington could mess up something like the use of the Sturmgewher rifle like that. What was also interesting was to learn that the original claim that Hitler labelled the MP-44 to be an assault rifle has NEVER really been documented according to one article I read many years ago. In the article, the author said that the anti-gun people in front of Congress "needed a catch phrase like assault rifle to further their unpopular agenda." That catch phrase became the words assault rifle. I don't know what is myth, lies or truth but it is really interesting to see how people from overseas react to what our politicians do in Washington. :barf:

Detachment Charlie
August 14, 2007, 01:17 PM
Along with others here, I have combat experience with the M2 in the Sixties. Cute, handy little rifle. But when it comes right down to its intended chore, it stunk, IMHO. After the first few "unpleasant encounters," I dumped it for an M16 (not an A1) or a shotgun and longed for the heavy M14.
YMMV.

Fosbery
August 14, 2007, 01:23 PM
If the criteria for 'assault rifle' is intermediate cartridge select-fire, then the Russian Fedorov predates the Stgw.44 by decades. Chambered in 6.5mm Arisaka (which is roughly equal to 5.56mm in foot/pounds if I remember correctly) and capable of semi or full auto. It was first issued in 1916.

Dr. Peter Venkman
August 14, 2007, 02:21 PM
The M1 Carbine was not select fire, that's a big reason why.

Geronimo45
August 14, 2007, 02:28 PM
The M1 Carbine doesn't have that shoulder thingy that goes up.

Limeyfellow
August 14, 2007, 02:31 PM
Yup, but the applications went a bit beyond the intended use.
Some GIs liked the light weight, large magazine capacity, and M2 full auto. Some disliked the lower power.

Its not like in WW2 most had a choice. It turned out the M1 Carbine was alot faster and cheaper to produce, so they ended up in the hands of frontline troops when they didn't have enough M1 Garands. A good example of this would be Iwo Jima when the amount of Carbines was nearly as equal to the Garands. Economics and Expediatiancy trumps the use or abilities of weapons in war on most occasions.

SSN Vet
August 14, 2007, 02:37 PM
just read the entire Wikipedia article on STG-44 and it was very interesting.

Sounds like "sturmgewehr" is better interpreted as Storm Rifle...and has a dual meaning......storm (like a thunderstorm) and storm (like to storm the tower).


The article says Hitler killed the program twice, but the Army really wanted it to counter the Russian's wide scale deployment of the PPSh-41....but they didn't want the limited range of the pistol cartridges already used in the MP-40. AND...there lies the answer to the question that started the thread.

I don't doubt Hitler named the rifle (after reportedly test firing it) as he micro-managed everything else, and by doing so he took credit for the whole idea. Being the true master of propoganda that he was, it makes sense that he would come up with a "motivated" title like "sturmgewehr". Hitler was a product of his times and the martial spirit of the German mind had already given us such colorful terms as "Blitzkrieg" and "Storm Trooper"... so why not a "Storm Rifle".

Some people effectively use motivational language with "pizaz" (just looke at British ship names for instance) while others chose to use a more mundane technical speak.

Isn't it "funny" how the Brady bunch has to turn to good ol' propaganda speak and borrow the language of Hitler to get their message (scaring people) out.

Good thing such "scary language" didn't deter the America of 1940.....where as half of the country today is ready to wet themselves every time the Libs shout "Boo!"

Carl N. Brown
August 14, 2007, 02:57 PM
The M1 Carbine was developed as a US Army Ordnance
project for a "Light Rifle" to replace the handgun to
arm rear echelon troops because the future of warfare
appeared to be the Blitzkrieg: the front could be anywhere,
and cooks, ammo carriers and other support troops who
would normally be armed with a .45 1911 would be useless.

The MP43 MP44 StG44 "assault rifle" was designed to replace
the submachinegun (MP38 MP40) and the rifle (M98k) and
was chambered for an intermediate rifle round, 8mm Kurz.

The M1 carbine was intended to replace the pistol, and is
chambered for a .30 round roughly equivalent to .357 Mag.

benEzra
August 14, 2007, 03:03 PM
Some people effectively use motivational language with "pizaz" (just looke at British ship names for instance)
HMS Dreadnought, most definitely. Even today, "dreadnought" connotes a big, ultra-powerful warship, which tells you the hold that ship's name has on the English language.

HMS Indefatigable doesn't hit speakers of American English with quite the same punch as Dreadnought, though. (I'm not quite sure which syllable to put the accent on, for one thing.)

SSN Vet
August 14, 2007, 03:12 PM
HMS Dreadnought

or...

HMS Tireless
HMS Swiftsure
HMS Treanchant

where as I had to serve on the yet another USS "dead senator"

Carl N. Brown
August 14, 2007, 03:12 PM
While we are parsing language

The German word Machinengewehr would be literally translated as
"machine rifle" and Machinenpistole as "machine pistol." But from
my high school German I recall that German compound words often
mean more than the 1 + 1 of the words. I suspect the correct
translation of "machinengewehr" is "rifle caliber machine gun" and
"machinenpistole" is "pistol caliber machine gun."

MD_Willington
August 14, 2007, 03:42 PM
...because Lewis and Clarke had a 22 shot air rifle on the "Voyage of Discovery"...

Carl N. Brown
August 14, 2007, 03:48 PM
Geronimo45 : ""The M1 Carbine doesn't have that shoulder thingy that goes up. ""

Oh, drat, I completely overlooked that point. Mea culpa. The true test of
an assault weapon is the -- whatever McCarthy said.

kungfuhippie
August 14, 2007, 03:51 PM
It's odd that Diane Feinstein (of Jewish descent) has been a big player in "defining" a phrase coined by Hitler.

According to California an assault rifle needs to have a pistol grip, detachable hi-capacity magazines, and be able to shoot through two cop cars and kill hundreds of children, from the hip, with out need to reload.

So, no the m1 and m2 are not assault rifles.

alucard0822
August 14, 2007, 05:01 PM
It would make sense the first assault rifle would be the first rifle that was actually called "assault rifle" or sturmgewehr

In the same way the US didn't have an "air force" untill after WWII

The original use of the term did not describe features, it described a specific rifle and the strategy of it's deployment with a buzzword.

It has been a practice throughout time of malevolent rulers of all types to reach back in history and use a notable symbol or word in their propaganda and to give it legitimacy and appeal to the masses.

Hitler basterdized the swastika from an ancient hindu symbol for balance and wellbeing

"Manifest destiny" was borrowed from Macedonia at the time of Alexander the Great to justify westward expansion and extermination of natives

"assault rifle/weapon" is borrowed from Nazi Germany to both market semi automatic battle rifle replicas and conversions, and to villify their ownership by american citizens to further an opressive political agenda.


IMO the term was meant to describe a specific rifle and the strategy of it's deployment, not a class of rifles, or features, or "non-sporting rifles", or even guns with "that shoulder thing that goes up", It would be like refering to a volkswagen jetta as a "blitzkreig vehicle"

SSN Vet
August 14, 2007, 05:29 PM
malevolent

excellent word use of the day award!

Carl N. Brown
August 14, 2007, 05:45 PM
""volkswagen jetta as a "blitzkreig vehicle" ""

I thought that was the VolksWagen "Thing"
the civilian version of the WWII German jeep.

Cocked & Locked
August 14, 2007, 06:46 PM
Why Isn't the M-1 Carbine the 1st Assault Weapon?

because lever actions were?

http://pic14.picturetrail.com/VOL523/3082611/17383006/270024921.jpg

kungfuhippie
August 14, 2007, 06:54 PM
The VW type 181 (aka "the thing") is not the civilian version of the Kubelwagen (german for "bucket car") It has similarities in profile and similar chassis. Different suspension, different transmission, different engine, no rifle rack or mg mount and the spare was in the trunk, not on the roof. All the tactical tools were gone. Now the Schwimmwagen would be cool to get.

Anyway everyone knows that a GTI the new German Assault Vehicle. It's small, and turbo charged. You can drive from the hip with out refueling.

alucard0822
August 14, 2007, 09:52 PM
The VW type 181 (aka "the thing") is not the civilian version of the Kubelwagen (german for "bucket car") It has similarities in profile and similar chassis. Different suspension, different transmission, different engine, no rifle rack or mg mount and the spare was in the trunk, not on the roof. All the tactical tools were gone

AKA could be used for "sporting purposes" in political speak;) and not so different a comparison from the STG44 "assault rifle" and the AR-15 that most folks call an "assault rifle"

The funny thing is there are probably more people killed in or by VWs than with "assault rifles", in fact select-fire battle rifles have probably killed less american civilians in crimes than any other type of firearm

silverlance
August 14, 2007, 10:03 PM
when someone said "the thing" I thought "Ontos".

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=62395&stc=1&d=1187139520

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=62395&stc=1&d=1187139520

ROMAK IV
August 14, 2007, 11:28 PM
The assault rifle is a part of a strategy or tactic. The STG44 was designed with the intent of using for that purpose as earlier designs would not. Another "feature" to be considered would be a design that would be inexpensive to produce, so that it would be available in quantity. The term "assault rifle" has lost its meaning anyway.

kungfuhippie
August 15, 2007, 01:01 AM
My old vw did have a pistol grip shifter...And a reverse lock. It even had dual-twin barrel dellorto carburetors. And come to think of it, I built it a custom, bright red silencer that increased efficency and flow without ruining proper back pressure. It did have a gas operated pistol setup, but it was not fully automatic. Come to think of it, when I first got it it was select fire. But it did the selecting and most of the time is didn't select cylinder #3.

Sunray
August 15, 2007, 01:40 AM
"...that the .30 carbine is based on..." The .30 carbine was based on the .32 Winchester SL, not Pedersen's .30 calibre.
The M1 Carbine was the first "assualt rifle" because by definition it isn't one. There have been exactly two assualt rifles. Ever. The STg44 and the AK-47. Everything else, since, is a battle rifle.

U.S.SFC_RET
August 15, 2007, 07:37 AM
Jim Watson Scares the Heck outta me Quote:
Because we are not Krauts we don't get to make up kewl words like Sturmgewehr. And because we are nice Americans, we don't assault anybody.

Jim Stop predicting the future! Our nice politicians will get to muckin with our military and tell them to play nice. :fire:

HorseSoldier
August 15, 2007, 10:31 AM
There have been exactly two assualt rifles. Ever. The STg44 and the AK-47. Everything else, since, is a battle rifle.

That's kind of an idiosyncratic classification that I don't think most authorities in the field would endorse.

alucard0822
August 15, 2007, 11:00 AM
Because we are not Krauts we don't get to make up kewl words like Sturmgewehr. And because we are nice Americans, we don't assault anybody
depending on the culture and the times different societies name rifles accordingly, but following the same logic (for fun:D)

SMLE mkIV : her majesty's fine besmerching arm

Arisaka type 99 : super rifle #1

PRoC type 56 : feirce dragon that spreads water lillies

USSR ak-47 : the proud sweat of the proletariat produces this to defend mother russia from capitalist pigs

M16 : the fist of democracy

C7 : show those hosers who's boss eh.

HK43 : for the shooting of girly men

Chauchat : le club

Phased plasma rifle in the 40w range : go pick on another planet

GunTech
August 15, 2007, 11:04 AM
Assault rifle is a term that is pretty well understood to mean a rifle with selct fire capability and firing an intermediate cartridge between an full power mmilitary cartridge and a pistol round.

As another poster noted, Hitler had given express orders that no new rifles were to be developed, but based on German research post WWI, the High Coomand saw a role for an intermediate cartridge that would operate effectively out to 300 yards or so to replace the SMG (really, a 50-100 yard weapon). The weapon was initially released as the MP43, and MP44 before becoming the 'assault rifle' StG44. There is some debate about whether the StG was originally classed as an MP to conceal a new rifle or because that is where it fit in the High Commands thinging (A superior SMG). Both Russia and Germany were huge users of the SMK, whereas the US, with it's 'rifleman' mentality considered the Garand the premier infantry weapon (althoyg issuing plenty of carbines and SMGs).

It should be remembered that the focus of the German infactry squad wa=s the machinegun (MG34 and MG43) and the other members of the squad were basically there to protect the machinegunners who were expected to handle the serious killing.

The US was certainly no pioneer in the assasult rifle, and in fact actively opposed any adoption of that type of weapon post WWII. All of the Allies except the US heavily favored producing something akin to the StG44 after the was. FNs FAL was originally chambered in the german 7.92x33mm at the insistence of the British, and Allied weapon development focused on and intermediate round (e.g. the British 280).

With the establishment of NATO, the decision was made to standardize on a rifle round, and the US pretty much rammed the 308 down the throat of the other members, with the understanding that the other members would select the common rifle.

The other members of NATO chose the FAL, at which point the US decided to go it's own way and adopt the M14 - a 'product improved' M1 Garand.

The whole stody is quite interesting - particularly the influene of a single man - Col Rene Studler - on the US adoption of the M14 and the repudiation of the whole assasult rifle concept. See "The Great Rifle Controversy" by Ezell.

HorseSoldier
August 15, 2007, 11:43 AM
As far as the German history of the assault rifle, it may bear noting that the original (pre-WW2) nomenclature for that class of weapons that eventually became know as Sturmgewehrs was Maschinenkarabine (my German spelling may be off, but "Machine Carbine" in any case).

Might also be worth noting that in the post-WW2 German speaking world, West Germany classed infantry rifles as Gewehr-#, regardless of whether it is a battle rifle or assault rifle or whatever. The East Germans classified their Kalashnikov clones as a machine pistol (MPiK-74 is, if I recall correctly, the nomenclature for their version of the AK-74 for instance). The Austrians called everything a Sturmgewehr -- FAL was StG-58 in their military use, the AUG is the StG-77. I suspect that both East and West Germany avoided "sturmgewehr" because of its association with Hitler, Austria (being less hung up on exising every hint and echo of the Nazi era) used the term to describe (apparently) any post-WW2 self-loading infantry rifle. In any case, looking at the German language to provide precise clues on intent is not going to be much more productive than doing the same thing in English.

slzy
August 15, 2007, 12:01 PM
i knew it was"intermediate" but i did'nt know how "intermediate" 7.63 x 39 was till i looked up 7.62x25 and 7.62 x 54 on ammoguide. i have always thought aks were more like magnum sub-guns than rifles.

Harley Quinn
August 15, 2007, 12:42 PM
The M2 actually falls into the assault rifle catagory as I have found at numerous sites.
M1 fails to be an assault rifle.

This helps explain what the Assault Rifle is considered. At this location anyway;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assault_rifle

Works for me.:what:

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