Ruger End Shake


PDA






mnshooter
March 23, 2006, 02:49 PM
My new SRH has none, zero; My new GP100 has a little. Have not measured it yet. How much is too much? I hate to send it back if there is an acceptable amount.

Thanks
Jeff

If you enjoyed reading about "Ruger End Shake" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Old Fuff
March 23, 2006, 05:39 PM
Apparently Ruger considers .004" to be acceptable. I think that's excessive. Ron Powers who builds precision revolvers, as well as Freedom Arms say .001" I try to stay at no more then .002".

Take your choice...

One thing to remember. Once it starts it will get worse, especially if you shoot lots of Magnum level loads.

JLaw
March 23, 2006, 05:52 PM
Could someone define "end shake"?

Thank you,

JLaw

mnshooter
March 23, 2006, 07:38 PM
Just checked it with feeler gages. .003 maybe .004. It shoots real well, so I don't know if I should send it out to Ruger or not. It's a brand new gun as of Friday with 50 rounds shot in it.

Old Fuff
March 23, 2006, 08:25 PM
JLaw:

Endshake or "end-shake" (I see it both ways) is back & forth movement in a revolver cylinder when it is latched. This should not be confused with rotational movement, which is side-to-side when the cylinder is locked by the cylinder stop (Smith & Wesson) or cylinder bolt (Colt).

Old Fuff
March 23, 2006, 08:29 PM
mnshooter:

Before sending in the gun I would call the company and see what they say. I suspect that if it is at or under .004" they'll say that it's in specification.

Then I'd watch it, and as soon as it went over .004" I'd send it in.

If you shoot it much with heavy loads it shouldn't take long.

Edited to add: I do think that it's interesting the end-shake is already at the no-go mark when it's new in the box.

mnshooter
March 23, 2006, 09:10 PM
Olf Fuff

Yes, it is kind of sad. Actually, I'm a bit disappointed with my last two Ruger purchases, both GP100s. The first one is still at Ruger for having quite a bit of cylinder "slop". The guy at the gun counter where I shop said it was the loosest new Ruger he had ever seen. I have not heard back from them on it yet. The second one is the one we are talking about at the moment. Ironically, I bought this one to use after Ruger told me they had a 4-6 week lead time on repairs for the first one. I think a call to them is in order.

mnshooter
March 23, 2006, 09:42 PM
After messing around a bit, I noticed that the amount of movement varies depending on where the cylinder is rotated. At two of the chambers, the end shake is nearly imperseptible, and as the cylinder is rotated, it becomes increasingly worse, up to about .004.
What could this mean?

CAnnoneer
March 23, 2006, 10:28 PM
Tuco Maria Ramirez would say "Uuugh!" and assemble one from spare parts. :)

I am sorry to hear there are problems with a Ruger. I am pretty happy with my KP89, but then again it is not a revolver.

JNewell
March 23, 2006, 10:38 PM
No, Tuco might have shot the vendor. :what: :eek:

This does reinforce the importance of checking new guns, not just used ones (sadly). :mad:

Surefire
March 24, 2006, 12:21 AM
Yes, it is kind of sad. Actually, I'm a bit disappointed with my last two Ruger purchases, both GP100s. The first one is still at Ruger for having quite a bit of cylinder "slop". The guy at the gun counter where I shop said it was the loosest new Ruger he had ever seen. I have not heard back from them on it yet. The second one is the one we are talking about at the moment. Ironically, I bought this one to use after Ruger told me they had a 4-6 week lead time on repairs for the first one. I think a call to them is in order.

Two of my last 4 bought GP 100s have binding-like issues right out of the box, which I have to get fixed. Another GP has something going on with the cylinder (the cylinder will sometimes hesitate to move when the action is open). This one is at least shootable, unlike the two that bind. Only 1 of my 4 recent GP 100 purchases has gone without incident--and even that GP is far from ideal (rough metal work, lots of tool marks). I think that Ruger quality control has gone down the toilet (I've also had serious problems with a Ruger P97, and a Ruger Mk II). Only one recent Ruger purchase I am very happy with, a Redhawk in .44 Magnum that is super tight with a great action, and with absolutely ZERO issues. At this point, I'm seriously considering going exclusively to S&W for revolvers, MIM parts & lock or not. I'm NOT at all impressed with Rugers out of box reliability. Its sad, because for a long time I was a HUGE Ruger fan...I even prefer the Ruger manual of arms over any other revolver...but recently (last 5 years) I've had terrible luck with NIB Rugers.

Surefire
March 24, 2006, 12:24 AM
Ironically, I bought this one to use after Ruger told me they had a 4-6 week lead time on repairs for the first one. I think a call to them is in order.

4-6 wait time for repairs? Wow! When my Sig P239 needed repairs, I got it back in under 2 weeks (this was several years ago).

I guess a lot of people are having problems with Rugers if it takes this long to get them fixed.

It is really too bad, when they work, they are a great gun.

Old Fuff
March 24, 2006, 12:59 AM
mnshooter:

After messing around a bit, I noticed that the amount of movement varies depending on where the cylinder is rotated. At two of the chambers, the end shake is nearly imperseptible, and as the cylinder is rotated, it becomes increasingly worse, up to about .004.
What could this mean?

I suspect that either the front face of the cylinder isn't square, or that the barrel of the crane on which the cylinder revolves is slightly off so that the cylinder is turning in a off-center course. These are things the factory would probably have to determine because I doubt that you have the necessary fixtures.

Rotate the cylinder until you can insert the .004" feeler gauge. then partially pull back the hammer to that the cylinder can turn. Then see if it will without binding. If it won't I suspect an out-of-square cylinder face.

Be sure of course that both the cylinder face and breech end of the barrel are clean. :scrutiny:

mnshooter
March 24, 2006, 10:46 AM
Called Ruger this morning. They said to send it in. I'm glad I still have my Blackhawk.
Thanks for all the replies.

Jeff

Old Fuff
March 24, 2006, 11:02 AM
Well in my experience, Blackhawks usually work... :)

GrantCunningham
March 24, 2006, 05:56 PM
Sadly, this seems to be par for the course with Ruger revolvers as of late. I have in the shop a new GP-100 whose endshake was almost .005" (since corrected), and I've seen examples on dealer's shelves with all manner of quality control issues. :barf:

Oddly, while the revolver division seems to be suffering from a lack of dedicated craftspeople, the autoloader ("bottomfeeder") division is producing some of the best reciprocating pistols that I've seen from any maker - the new P-345 is not only nicely put together, it feels good in the hand and (gasp!) even looks good.

I think Ruger needs to transfer some folks from making pistols to making revolvers...;)

GrantCunningham
March 24, 2006, 06:05 PM
Whoops, double post - my bad!

pezo
March 24, 2006, 07:07 PM
Last gp100 I bought was in 05' and it functions like a dream, I have an older one 02' and a sp101 from 04'. they work fine. ONly thing is I had to clean and oil them before shooting. the sp101 in particular needed the cleaning. The function of these guns seem crisp. At least in my case. I'm happy and would rely on em to work when needed.

If you enjoyed reading about "Ruger End Shake" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!