Cleaning


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Mendel5
March 29, 2006, 12:46 PM
I just bought my first shotgun (OK, first firearm) and the manual says I should clean it before I go out shooting the first time. I bought a shotgun cleaning kit, but am somewhat confused. Do I need to remove the barrel to clean it the first time (I'm sure it doesn't mean a "complete" cleaning ... just one done after initial testing)?

Thanks, in advance!

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Fred Fuller
March 29, 2006, 12:55 PM
Often new guns have various types of preservatives applied before they leave the factory. It's a good idea to remove that preservative and lubricate the gun properly before taking it out the first time. That means field stripping it according to the owner's manual and cleaning it thoroughly, then lubricating it as is called for in the manual.

Be especially careful of the bore and chamber of the barrel, these areas need to be really clean.

lpl/nc

larryw
March 29, 2006, 01:35 PM
Welcome Mendel5!

Cleaning routine will vary from gun to gun, but generally one cleans the bore and all parts that are exposed to powder residue or other gunk (i.e. mud, rain). Moving parts and bare metal are lightly lubed with gun oil or grease, depending on the type.

What shotgun did you buy; make and model?

Rockrivr1
March 29, 2006, 01:42 PM
Same question as larryw. What shotgun did you get. For most of them it's not very hard to remove the bbl to clean it. Also, what cleaning kit did you buy? I'm assuming it's probably one from Hoppes.

Just follow the instructions and take your time so you know what came from where. For a shotgun, there isn't to many parts to worry about. The problem will be when you catch the "Gun Bug" and buy a lot more guns. Some of them if you rush into taking them apart, you ultimately end up with spare parts when you put them back together. Don't ask how I know. :rolleyes:

scout26
March 29, 2006, 05:10 PM
Some of them if you rush into taking them apart, you ultimately end up with spare parts when you put them back together. Don't ask how I know.

I'm working on the theory that if you taken them apart enough times, you'll end up with enough spare parts to make TWO !!!! :p ;) :scrutiny: :o

sm
March 29, 2006, 06:15 PM
I'm working on the theory that if you taken them apart enough times, you'll end up with enough spare parts to make TWO !!!!

Best post of the day!! :D


Akin to:

-Weight is horsepower...
-Gotta look good getting there..
-And if it ain't fast - chrome it!

Mendel5
March 31, 2006, 10:16 AM
It's a Remington 870 Express LH with a 28" barrel.

Oldnamvet
March 31, 2006, 12:48 PM
I always like to get to know the gun very well before I shoot it. That means taking it down for a thorough cleaning, and taking my time. If you might get confused, take pictures or make drawings/notes at each step of the process. Then when you start shooting and really have to clean it, you won't have any problems (hopefully).

Mendel5
March 31, 2006, 03:12 PM
Is it difficult to "field strip" and clean it for a newbie? I'm kind of wary of taking apart my first shotgun before I've ever pulled the trigger :uhoh:

larryw
March 31, 2006, 05:45 PM
Not bad at all. Here's a site with pics identifying the key parts and steps:

http://www.alpharubicon.com/leo/870brian.htm

And some other info that may be of benefit:

http://www.arm.gov/sites/nsa/870.stm

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