Vent ribs?


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oxfordpony
March 29, 2006, 10:56 PM
I am looking for a trap gun. I have looked at several already. My question is why do some have higher ribs than others? I have seen some that are very high and some that are hardly off the barrel and the are both considered trap style guns. Is that a criteria for a trap gun or a preference? Any help would be great. Thank you

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kudu
March 30, 2006, 05:34 AM
It's a preferance, the real high ribs get the center of gravity down on the gun making the recoil come straight back instead of up and back. That's why most shooters that have anO/U will shoot the bottom barrel first, less muzzle rise by doing it this way on the first shot.

oxfordpony
March 30, 2006, 08:13 AM
Thank you for the information.

PJR
March 30, 2006, 08:40 AM
The other reason for the higher ribs are to better dissipate heat from the barrel and reduce the mirage affect. The very high rib on trap guns were pioneered for this purpose by Danielle Perazzi for the 1968 Mexico Olympics.

45auto
March 30, 2006, 08:44 AM
Also, high ribs means higher stocks which have the effect of keeping your head more erect. That can mean better vision so to speak.

In the Olympic trap sports, the high rib has not taken hold. Most ribs are low.
In ATA style trap, high ribs are common.

oxfordpony
March 30, 2006, 09:02 AM
I was wondering because the Ruger Red Label w/ 30" barrel states sporting clays model. The only thing that I see different on the gun is a bead mid barrel. It appears close to the barrel on the Winchester select trap model also. Maybe it is the stock? Just trying to figure all this out. I like the Ruger and would like to try sporting clays, but I also would like to shoot trap. I (wife) can not afford two guns for this activity at this time. Trying to get an all around gun if possible.

Dave McCracken
March 30, 2006, 09:57 AM
Worrying about the rib height is something to do when 99/100 is completely unacceptable.

Meanwhile, shoot what you want at all games and have fun.

ArmedBear
March 30, 2006, 04:08 PM
oxford-

A Sporting Clays gun is not the same as a Trap gun.

A Sporting Clays gun is generally a field gun with fancier wood, sometimes longer barrels and maybe ported barrels. It has stock dimensions similar to a hunting shotgun, with an angled comb and drop around 2.5", give or take. It's designed to shoot targets moving in every possible direction, from straight up in the air, overhead and flying away, across, approaching from a distance, or rolling along the ground.

A Trap gun is generally a heavy gun with a really long barrel (30"+ on a repeater or 32"+ on a break-action gun) and a straight, high comb, drop around 1.5", give or take. It's designed to shoot flying targets that are rising and moving away from the shooter, sometimes to the right or left. Generally, it has a built-in vertical lead that makes it easier to hit rising targets.

There are four reasons you might see a high rib.

1. Trap guns, since they shoot a bit higher, often have ribs that are angled so the barrel points up when the shooter sees the rib as "flat." The Browning BT-99 is illustrative of this feature, as well as the straight comb:

http://www.browning.com/products/catalog/firearms/images/017054m.jpg

2. Some trap guns are "double singles", "over-singles", or "combo guns." These guns are built on an over-and-under frame, and can be switched from a double gun to a single barrel in seconds. To compensate for the missing barrel, sometimes they employ a rib in place of the upper barrel. This SKB is a combo gun.

http://www.skbshotguns.com/images/Trap%20-%20HCL-4.jpg

3. Some trap guns have adjustable ribs, so the shooter can change the angle for preference, long-distance games, etc. Naturally, this requires a higher, larger rib since it has to be a rigid structure that moves independently of the barrel.

http://www.skbshotguns.com/images/85TSS-HCL-1.jpg

4. Some trap guns have a really high rib just to combat the mirage effect from competition that really heats up the barrels. This Perazzi International Trap gun has a high rib that is also adjustable.

http://www.perazzi.it/dataentry/upload/39/1421/perazziMXx2005.jpg

Anyway, you probably don't want to use a trap gun for Sporting Clays. Some people do, though. In SC you usually start with the gun "low", like you are hunting, then call "pull" and shoulder it. In trap, you shoulder the gun, get "set" then call "pull." Most trap stocks don't work well for quick shouldering; they are made for very deliberate, precise placement. And you want a gun that will work equally in all directions for SC. I'd say it's easier to use a field or sporting gun for trap than the other way around. But, again, some people just like the fit of a particular "trap" model and use it for SC.

Here are three Remington 1100 models, designated "field", "sporting" and "trap", for comparison. Note that the photos are scaled differently. I got them from Remington's web site.

1100 Classic Field 26" barrel
http://www.remington.com/images/products/firearms/shotgun/smsil_1100classicfield.jpg

1100 Sporting 12 28" barrel
http://www.remington.com/images/products/firearms/shotgun/smsil_1100sporting12.jpg

1100 Classic Trap 30" barrel
http://www.remington.com/images/products/firearms/shotgun/smsil_1100classictrap.jpg

Have fun, and remember, gun fit is very important. You and your wife, unless you are exactly the same size, will probably want your own guns. If you buy 2, that's what I'd recommend: one that fits you and one that fits her. They may be VASTLY different shotguns.

Steve C
March 30, 2006, 06:58 PM
One of the main reasons for high rib and high montecarlo style stock on a trap gun is so that the shooter doesn't have to pull his head down to the stock. Picking or lifting your head up from the stock when shooting is a common reason for missing your target. If your head is already up when the gun is mounted you can't make that mistake. I've seen extended height ribs that mount on top of a factory rib that shooter use to aleviate this problem.

mswestfall
March 31, 2006, 10:23 PM
Nice Post ArmedBear!

I'm a believer in buying a first gun that is good for all around use. There are of course limits to that comment.

Buy a functional gun and learn to shoot it. I see guys switch guns (or adjust their gun) as an excuse for not learning to shoot. Don't mean to be harsh.

Shoot often and enjoy.

ATAShooter
April 1, 2006, 10:16 PM
Did sombody say TRAP? Oh, I love that game...:what:

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