Correct way to ship a long gun?


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Impala
April 24, 2006, 08:23 PM
I'm new to the whole shipping guns across the country thing and I'm about to send my rem.7400 to ASI for some custom work and a new barrel. I've never had to ship a gun before and I was wondering what the correct way to go about doing this is. Should I stick with any particular company? should the shipping be insured? What protective measures should I take to ship the gun? and where can I get the right kind of shipping container?

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redranger1
April 24, 2006, 08:33 PM
i would go to a gun shop and tell them what you have, then ask and see if they have any old gun boxes they could give you(preferably unmarked boxes would be best). if not then you may have to take some measurements and get somethin from a boxing store. as far as protecting the gun, just make sure that it will not shift around inside of the box and that the ends(escpecially the barrel end) are very well padded so they wont go through the box. and make sure as i said above, that the box doesnt have anything on it suggesting what may be inside other then ofcourse the shipping address. yes you definetly want to insure it! and im sure that ups or fedex would be just fine. if you can take easy parts like stock and such off of it so if they ask whats in it you can say gun parts so you wont get any sort of hassle.

deadin
April 24, 2006, 08:54 PM
Federal law requires that you inform a common carrier (UPS, FedEX) that your shipment contains a firearm. (Not "gunparts"). They also may ask you to open the box to verify that it is not loaded.
It is legal for you to ship a rifle or shotgun to a gunsmith, manufacturer, etc. via US Postal Service. You might look into this as it will be a whole lot safer and cheaper.

Dean

dakotasin
April 24, 2006, 08:59 PM
i always ship rifles and shotguns usps.

get a box that's long enough, put the gun in it, and work padding around it as best you can. wall street journals are excellent for this because there is so much paper in a given issue that you'll have plenty out of 2-3 days worth of journals. the best thing is to ship it in the factory box w/ the factory styrofoam/padding, if at all possible.

gezzer
April 24, 2006, 09:51 PM
Buy a cheap hard case, get a box that will fit it (fluorescent tube box works great) Put case in box pad so it don't move. Use USPS and insure for the cost of replacement.

Trust me if it is not in a hard case,
You will NOT GET PAID BY THE INSURANCE!

Federal law allows you to ship long guns via USPS to a gunsmith, manufacturer, or FFL.

UPS will most likely be cheaper but you will have to take it to a distribution center and I can almost guarantee they will tell you it is illegal if you are not an FFL. The counter folks are MORONS with their own little agenda.

American By Blood
April 24, 2006, 10:18 PM
UPS will most likely be cheaper but you will have to take it to a distribution center and I can almost guarantee they will tell you it is illegal if you are not an FFL. The counter folks are MORONS with their own little agenda.

I work for FEDEX and as far as I know the company's policy is that only FFLs can ship guns via the service. This is likely to minimize the company's exposure to criminal charges ("Well Mr. BATFE JBT, the sender promised that the recipient was a licensed dealer or collecter"). With so many of FEDEX's packages originating at FEDEX-Kinko's document and shipping centers corporate simply can't count on Joe Copy Slave to have the knowledge and native intelligence required to deal with licences, regulations, etc. The company, therefore, relies on the shipper to have all of the requisite knowledge and paperwork.

It's a shame, too. A few weeks ago a gentlemen came up to my counter looking to send in a Mini-14 for repairs. We had a pleasant chat about rifles, but I had to direct him to a gun shop a couple of miles up the street.

All that said, I'd recommend a private carrier like FEDEX, UPS, or DHL when shipping firearms. The controls are much tighter at their facilities and the employee culture isn't nearly as liberal about things like theft as it tends to be among government workers.

EOD Guy
April 25, 2006, 11:12 AM
Federal law requires that you inform a common carrier (UPS, FedEX) that your shipment contains a firearm. (Not "gunparts"). They also may ask you to open the box to verify that it is not loaded.
It is legal for you to ship a rifle or shotgun to a gunsmith, manufacturer, etc. via US Postal Service. You might look into this as it will be a whole lot safer and cheaper.

Dean

Since he is shipping to a licensee, notification is not legally required. UPS and Fedex, though, have policies requiring notification and not telling could mess up any insurance claims. USPS does not specifically require notification.

Federal law allows you to ship long guns via USPS to a gunsmith, manufacturer, or FFL.


You are not limited to gunsmiths, manufacturers, or FFLs. You can mail rifles or shotguns to anyone legally allowed to receive them under GCA 68.

hso
April 25, 2006, 12:12 PM
http://www.thegunzone.com/ship-guns.html

deadin
April 25, 2006, 12:14 PM
You are not limited to gunsmiths, manufacturers, or FFLs. You can mail rifles or shotguns to anyone legally allowed to receive them under GCA 68.

I stand corrected, partially..:p

Yes, anyone legally allowed, within your own State. Outside home State requires the receipient to have a FFL. The one exception I know of is if the firearm is part of a bequest of an estate.


Dean

EOD Guy
April 25, 2006, 12:28 PM
Yes, anyone legally allowed, within your own State. Outside home State requires the receipient to have a FFL. The one exception I know of is if the firearm is part of a bequest of an estate.

You're correct. Along with bequests, I would think that the most common situation of shipping to a nonlicensee would be return of a firearm to the owner after repair. There are several other exceptions that mainly deal with law enforcement and the military that the average person would never use.

Also, the CMP ships directly to the purchaser without the involvement of an FFL on either end. They can do that because Congress exempted them from CGA 68.

deadin
April 25, 2006, 05:04 PM
Returns. Yes, I forgot about returns. I also seem to remember something about being able to mail to yourself but can't put my hands on the current regulation.

Dean

tegemu
April 25, 2006, 07:09 PM
I have shipped several handguns via FEDEX. If shipping to a purchaser, I had to provide a copy of the license of the FFL that was actually going to transfer the gun to a buyer. When shipping to a gun MFR for some reason, a copy of a FFL is not required. In all cases I specified that a gun was in the package. As far as I know - long guns are less stringent. I plan to ship some soon.

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