Thompson 80% recievers


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silicon wolverine
April 25, 2006, 04:05 AM
Ok Dumb question time. Numrich has 80% thompson recievers for sale. They say they are threaded and the ejector slot is cut. If im reading it right, wouldnt you just have to dremel out the cocking handle slot, weld it up and go to town? Or is there other stuff to do? Im not gonna build one (WAY too much dough) im just curious.

SW

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deadin
April 25, 2006, 10:07 AM
I'm no expert on NFA weapons, but I think other stuff to do? would include filing about a gazzilion forms with the BATFE to get permission to "make" a functioning full-auto. (And, I think, anything beyond "80%" is considered "functioning" whether it works or not.)
I would guess that the "20%" that is unfinished are the various holes, slots, etc. that you can't legally do without the paperwork (and paid fees.)

Dean

eab
April 25, 2006, 10:22 AM
If it was semi auto then yeah, you would be good to go. As long as the gun was leagle in all respects of the law. Now if you had a short barrel or it full auto, no. No good, you have a little more paper work to do.

Mac Attack
April 25, 2006, 11:41 AM
I thought about working up a 80% receiver to make a legal semi-auto. Then I realized that I could purchase a complete rifle for less than it would cost me to build one.

dfariswheel
April 25, 2006, 02:20 PM
80% means that there's still 20% of machine work left to do, and that 20% is some of the most intricate and difficult work to do.

Things like threading the ejector hole, cutting the locking "ramps" drilling the frame latch hole, drilling the sight holes, final machining of the bolt recess, etc.

In order to finish one of these, you have to have a WELL equipped machine shop and have some heavy-duty machinist skills.

What all this means is, you basically get a lump of metal that's been shaped and the major metal removal has been done.
What's left is the most difficult fine machining operations that really take the skills and tools.

The ATF will not allow receiver "blanks" to be sold that can finished into working guns with just a few simple operations with a drill and hammer.

Carl N. Brown
April 25, 2006, 02:26 PM
A private-build semi-auto Thompson would have to:
- have at least a 16 in. barrel,
- fire from the closed bolt position,
- NOT accept a full-auto fire control parts, and
- have a semi-auto fire control group pre approved by BATF FTB.
That's the minimum requirements I know about, and there
may be others.

A dummy gun can be built from a solid aluminum receiver and
a thompson parts set (minus the breechbolt).

For most of us, it is cheaper to buy either a semi-auto
replica or a dummy gun from a commercial maker.

mp510
April 25, 2006, 03:06 PM
would include filing about a gazzilion forms with the BATFE to get permission to "make" a functioning full-auto.

You can't make new mg's unless you are an SOT Manufactuirer.

There is OAL requirement if you want to make it a long gun w/ stock or if it starts as such. I believe it is at least 26.5 inches or something.

Carl N. Brown
April 25, 2006, 04:23 PM
16 inch minimum rifle barrel length.
18 inch minimum shotgun barrel length.
(otherwise you have a SBR short barrel rifle
or SBS short barrel shotgun)
AND
26 inch minimum overall length.

On these minimums, it is smart to allow at least 0.5" OVER
(16.5, 18.5 and 26.5") to allow for repairs (recrowning a
damaged muzzle, broken stock, etc).

You can make an AOW "any other weapon" shotgun pistol
which basically is physically no different from a SBS "short
barrel shotgun" with a pistol grip. The AOW is built on a
"virgin" receiver never part of a regular shotgun. A SBS is
made by putting a short barrel (under 18*) on a regular
shotgun. Both require a Form 1 and $200.00 tax to make
but you cannot put a shoulder stock on an AOW because
that would make it a SBS, while a SBS can have either a
pistol grip or regular stock. That is for a maker; the AOW
transfer tax is only 5.00 and the SBS transfer tax is 200.00
so there is an advantage to AOW over SBS for commercial
purchase. For a Form 1 builder the SBS is more versatile.
NFA makes me dizzy.:scrutiny:

BATF also has rules on converting an AOW or SBS to a
regular shotgun and removing it from the NFA registry;
why a person would do that after going through a Form 1
process and paying a 200.00 tax is hard to understand.
It can be done.

silicon wolverine
April 25, 2006, 10:53 PM
Thanks for the replies. This was more just a curiosity question than anyhting else.

SW

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