Bruce Willis - Pro Gun


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usmarine0352_2005
May 4, 2006, 02:45 PM
WILLIS SPEAKS OUT FOR GUNS

At least there's ONE ok guy in CA.

Movie star BRUCE WILLIS supports Americans in their constitutional right to carry a gun, insisting everyone should be able to defend themselves with a weapon if need be. The DIE HARD actor is keen to point out gun owners are not automatically violent. He says, "If you take guns away from legal gun owners then the only people who would have guns would be the bad guys. "Even a pacifist would get violent if someone were trying to kill him or her. "You would fight for your life, whatever your beliefs. You'd use a rock or tear one of these chairs out of the floor. "Hey, maybe I've been watching too many Bruce Willis movies!"

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TheArchDuke
May 4, 2006, 02:56 PM
hmm...what's his next movie? I'll go see it. He's pretty good anyway.

NineseveN
May 4, 2006, 02:57 PM
Not that I don't believe it, and Bruce is pretty much at the top of my list for actors, but, what's the source for this?

Justin
May 4, 2006, 03:02 PM
Snarky, high-horsed comment about a line of dialogue uttered in a movie over a decade ago in 5...4...3..

Rob1035
May 4, 2006, 03:17 PM
GLOCK 7!:neener:


Bruce is a pretty well known conservative on many topics from all accounts I've read...

NineseveN
May 4, 2006, 03:19 PM
Found it! Damn good article. :D My Bruce Willis collection has now been vindicated!

http://www.usaweekend.com/00_issues/000213/000213willis.html


Issue date: Feb 13, 2000

In this article:
Willis' first foray into film was Die Hard
He claims to have no regrets
He expresses outrage at lobbyists and corruption


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Being Bruce Willis
Means being honest. Outspoken. Bigger than life. Old habits die hard, it seems.

By Mary Roach

We're not here to see a movie. We're here because Willis owns this small-town Idaho theater and thought it would be a quiet, private place to talk about his new movie opening this week, The Whole Nine Yards. (Willis is big on privacy; he requests that the name of his town not be printed.)

Willis is one of those men whose Hollywood presence -- action hero, superstar, celebrity husband -- was so large and so ubiquitous for so long that it's hard to think of him as anything else. By the time the third Die Hard rolled around, people started to forget that Willis could play other types of roles. They forgot that he has played a traumatized Vietnam vet (In Country), an unpleasant construction boss (Nobody's Fool) and a lowlife boxer (Pulp Fiction). They forgot he made his name in comedy on TV's Moonlighting. While last year's The Sixth Sense went a long way toward re-establishing Willis as a diverse talent, people forget. I expected him to pull up in a Hummer, smoking a cigar.

Hardly. Willis is quiet and engaging; his manner puts one immediately at ease. "Big stars can be kind of intimidating and make other actors nervous, but Bruce does the opposite," says Jonathan Lynn, director of The Whole Nine Yards. "He tries to make all of them feel relaxed."

These days, Willis portrays himself as a die-hard stay-at-home. He quit drinking in 1987. He no longer throws loud parties or even attends them. It would appear he's becoming the man his father was: a family man in a working-class town.

Willis was reared in Carneys Point, N.J., the son of a shipyard mechanic. After high school and a quick succession of jobs, he enrolled in Montclair (N.J.) State College's drama program. In 1977, after he'd taken all the acting classes they had, he dropped out and moved to New York, where he worked in theater. Seven years later, a part in an off-Broadway production paved the way for a movie audition in Los Angeles. He didn't get that part, but while there, he auditioned for the role of a wise-guy private eye, beating out some 3,000 other hopefuls for the part that would put him on the map, Moonlighting's David Addison.

Willis' first foray into film was Die Hard (1988), the phenomenal success of which ensured a seamless transition from TV star to movie star. Willis makes no apologies for his frequent turns in mindless, violent action pics. Those movies, he says, afford him the opportunity to "work on [low-budget] films I have a passion for," such as his new movie.

And while he isn't ready to forsake action movies, Willis does believe in taking stock of one's life choices on a daily basis. "I've lost a couple of friends in freak accidents," he explains. "It makes you realize how fragile life is, how quickly it can be taken away. I think about my death at least once a day. I say to myself, 'Am I living my life? Am I enjoying my life today?' Because this is not a rehearsal. This is it."

This is about as personal as Willis is willing to get. He doesn't talk to reporters about his private life, and you really can't blame him. The tabloids dragged his marriage to Demi Moore through the muck for 10 years. Twice, the couple sued. (Though they won the suits, they separated shortly thereafter, in June 1998.) Willis is extraordinarily protective of their daughters, Rumer, 11, Scout, 8, and Tallulah, 6. "His priority is his daughters," says his former agent and longtime friend and producing partner Arnold Rifkin. "He's never available for films during the summers, because he wants to spend the time with his kids."

"He's generous to a fault," says Willis' younger brother, David, a Whole Nine Yards producer. "When we were shooting, Bruce would go to a great French restaurant and buy it out. He'd have them come out 20 miles to where we were shooting and cook all day, whatever we wanted. On his dime."

At 44, Bruce Willis appears to be a man at peace. He claims to have no regrets. "I don't play the regret game. Because how do you know the thing you're regretting isn't the thing that led you to something great?" He fears nothing. He sleeps well. He doesn't worry about aging. "I'm still about 24 at heart. And that's really where your age lives." Willis has even made peace with his retreating hairline. He shrugs. "You just gotta dig yourself."

While middle age has mellowed Willis, the man's no softie. He's outspoken. He's politically incorrect. He says he'd steer kids away from college unless they're "going to be a doctor or a lawyer," and he's never considered finishing his B.A. "It's just a trophy. I have some bowling trophies I think would be worth about the same thing." He owns a gun and holds fast to his constitutional right to do so:

"Everyone has a right to bear arms. If you take guns away from legal gun owners, then the only people who have guns are the bad guys." Even a pacifist, he insists, would get violent if someone were trying to kill her. "You would fight for your life. You'd use a rock or tear one of these chairs out of the floor." I tell him he's seen too many Bruce Willis movies.

That was not the thing to say. Willis disagrees with the notion that onscreen violence influences people's behavior, and he resents remarks to that effect made by government entities after the Columbine High shootings. "It's insulting to movie audiences. Anyone who goes to the movies knows that when you see someone killed on the screen, that actor gets up and dusts himself off after the take is over. In my heart, as a father, I think what causes violence -- violent children and violent young adults and violent adults -- is not having a good childhood, not having a father in the house, learning to become a sociopath instead of a good human being. It's as simple as that."

It's rare that the government says or does something Willis agrees with. He expresses outrage at lobbyists and corruption. "Special-interest groups show up in Washington with lots and lots and lots of money, and when they leave, they don't have the money with them anymore. You can talk about campaign reform, but that's all just the little tiny tip of the bull that goes on down there." When I ask whom he'd like to see as president, he says, "You," then explains: "I'd rather have somebody that didn't know anything about it than someone who's made a career out of lying and cheating and swindling people." He waves the topic away. "Don't get me started on politics."

Willis looks at his watch, a fine watch that tells the time in several parts of the globe, including Idaho, where it's time for this actor to go home. He smiles. "You're cutting into my gift-wrapping time." [It's two days before Christmas.] He shakes my hand and walks down the aisle toward the big silver screen, humming a tune.

panzermk2
May 4, 2006, 03:52 PM
I had heard in passing he's pro 2nd. It's nice to hear from Him directly.
Got a few old DVD's to buy this weekend

GunnySkox
May 4, 2006, 04:01 PM
Thanks for that article, NineseveN; it's the first news source I've read in several months that put a grin on my face instead of a knot in my belly.

~GnSx
P.S.~ I watched the news for half an hour on Monday. I got so angry that my stomach hurt for the rest of the day, and I'm not even exaggerating.

Third_Rail
May 4, 2006, 04:13 PM
That article is over six years old.

usmarine0352_2005
May 4, 2006, 04:39 PM
It's from here: And it's from 5-4-06

http://www.contactmusic.com/new/xmlfeed.nsf/mndwebpages/willis%20speaks%20out%20for%20guns_30_04_2006

or from the NRA website.

Willis Speaks Out For Guns

Movie star Bruce Willis supports Americans in their constitutional right to carry a gun, insisting everyone should be able to defend themselves with a weapon if need be.

Read About It: ContactMusic.com

POSTED: 5/4/2006

High Planes Drifter
May 4, 2006, 05:51 PM
He's one of my favotrite actors. Glad to hear he's pro 2nd.

Third_Rail
May 4, 2006, 05:53 PM
Drifter, let me quote something from the 2000 article...

"...If you take guns away from legal gun owners, then the only people who have guns are the bad guys." Even a pacifist, he insists, would get violent if someone were trying to kill her. "You would fight for your life. You'd use a rock or tear one of these chairs out of the floor." I tell him he's seen too many Bruce Willis movies.

Sound familiar?

Don't Tread On Me
May 4, 2006, 05:53 PM
I like the slow motion shootout at the end of Hostage.

sterling180
May 4, 2006, 05:57 PM
GLOCK 7!

After John Maclaine kills Sgt Cochrane and took away his gun-which happend to be a Glock 17 9mm-he goes in to Lorenzo's office and has an argument with the captain.Maclaine explains to Lorenzo that Cochrane's gun was a German-made Glock 7gun, made out of porcelain and was worth more than both Lorenzo's and his own, monthy paychecks.

Typical ill-thoughout names given out to items,that arn't called such things in the real-world.Other than that a great and very entertaining movie,with an exeptionally-believeable actor in the leading role as John Maclaine-Bruce Willis.Shame about the wrong information on the Glock.

ocabj
May 4, 2006, 06:09 PM
Yippee-kay-aye!

Diamondback6
May 4, 2006, 11:12 PM
A good friend of mine (my primary instructor in self-defense) knows Mr. Willis personally from a project they worked on together, and he tells me Bruce is a stand-up guy, even when they crossed paths years later at a Planet Hollywood. If it wouldn't corrupt him, I'd like to see him run for President. How to handle N. Koreas's nuclear saber-rattling? "Yippee kai-i-yay, ...."

Not quite "Go ahead, make my day," but still a good attitude for a CinC to have.

Hoploholic
May 5, 2006, 02:37 AM
Tom Sellic is another of the good guys. I would be more than happy to buy Tom and Bruce a frosty barley pop anyday.

DRZinn
May 5, 2006, 02:53 AM
a frosty barley popWhere does that term come from? I've only heard it in one place....

Lebben-B
May 5, 2006, 06:06 AM
a frosty barley pop

I've only heard people from the mid-west use that term. As for Willis, I met him on when I was deployed. He seemed like a real down to earth, shot-and-a-beer kinda guy.

Mike

Nematocyst
May 5, 2006, 06:23 AM
Did someone say "shot & a beer"?

Best Willis film, IMO: The Fifth Dimension.

It's all about Milla Jovovitch.

GunnySkox
May 5, 2006, 08:17 AM
That's the Fifth Element 'dere, hamstray, but you get our consolation prize:

*BANG*
...
"Anybody else wanna negotiate?"

:D

~GnSx

NineseveN
May 5, 2006, 08:56 AM
Tears of the Sun was also very good...and Last Man Standing, The Last Boyscout and...well, just about anything he's made I've enjoyed (except that Moonlighting show, but perhaps I was too youbng back then to enjoy it)...but I do indeed have a soft spot for The Fifth Element. :D :D :D

High Planes Drifter
May 5, 2006, 09:55 AM
Where does that term come from? I've only heard it in one place....
------------------------------------------

Barley pop is a beer. So is he Pro-2nd or what?

dm1333
May 5, 2006, 10:00 AM
My favorite Bruce Willis movie is Hudson Hawk. Anyone who knowingly makes a movie like that has got to have a lot of confidence in his manliness!

Nightfall
May 5, 2006, 10:26 AM
Finally, an actor with films I can watch without the nagging reminder in the back of my head that this person is happily working to erode my rights and advance leftist agendas. :)

Nematocyst
May 5, 2006, 06:41 PM
That's the Fifth Element 'dere, hamstray, but you get our consolation prize:...:D

Ha. One of my favorite, B-grade, sci-fi "cult" films ever and I botch the title. <sigh>

I stand corrected, and loved the consolation prize. :evil:

Nem

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