Dry firing


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kennyboy
May 17, 2006, 09:41 PM
What is the problem with dry firing guns? I know that it is not good for the guns, but why? Also, on another post of mine, somebody noted that it is safe to dry fire the CZ 452. Is this true? If it is, what other guns can one dry fire without causing any damage to the firearms?

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444
May 17, 2006, 09:45 PM
There is nothing wrong with dry firing and it isn't going to hurt the gun.

cavman
May 17, 2006, 09:48 PM
From what I have heard, the point on the firing pin can be flattened out if it hits the hard steel of the chamber and not the soft brass. Then one would be out of a working firearm.

But I always thought that centerfire style could be dry fired and it was only the rimfires that could not. As the CZ 452 is a rimfire I would be cautious until I knew for sure. The Ruger rimfire pistols, however, can be dry fired.

Half an answer at best,

have a great day
cavman

colt.45
May 17, 2006, 09:49 PM
i have always dry fired my guns. do far nothing has gone wrong.

R.W.Dale
May 17, 2006, 09:52 PM
You most certianlly can damage a firearm by dryfiring ESPECALLY rimfires.

When a rimfire is dry fired the firing pin can be blunted when it strikes the edge of the chamber, In some extreme cases you can damage the part of the chamber where the rim seats making for crummy accuracy and difficult chambering and extraction.

Freddymac
May 17, 2006, 09:58 PM
that dry firing over extends the firing pin and over compresses the firing pin spring. Allegedly this is bad because supposedly, when the pin hits the internal stop you can fracture the firing pin and bind the spring. I personally think that this is an old wives tale, but who knows, maybe back in the proverbial day when different steels were used it was possible..

chopinbloc
May 17, 2006, 10:00 PM
i know that you were talking about the cz 452 but ironically enough, the cz 52 is said to have a firing pin made of very brittle steel that can be damaged by dry firing.

frosty
May 17, 2006, 10:26 PM
Some guns like Smith&Wesson revolvers are designed to be dry fired. What is the purpose? If you want to practice trigger squeeze, purchase some snap caps( available in virtually all calibers), to practice with. Its just to simple, and will garentee no damage to the gun...:evil:

cracked butt
May 17, 2006, 11:33 PM
From what I have heard, the point on the firing pin can be flattened out if it hits the hard steel of the chamber and not the soft brass. Then one would be out of a working firearm.

The other way around. The steel on a barrel is very soft compared with a firing pin. An old rimfire will peen the edge of the chamber and you will not be able to chamber another round afterwards.

On modern rimfires, as far as I know have firing pin stops to prevent the firing pin from contacting the edge of the chamber when dryfired.

cavman
May 17, 2006, 11:40 PM
You mean that the pin would hit the edge of the chamber causing the chamber to be pinched in like a straw, narrowing the aperture?

rbernie
May 18, 2006, 01:04 AM
There is nothing wrong with dry firing and it isn't going to hurt the gun.Not always true.

Setting aside the rimfires as having already been discussed, T/C Encores can be damaged by dry-firing due to the design of the firing pin return spring. I've also been taught that dryfiring is contraindicated for SMLE/No4/No5 Enfields, with possible damage/breakage of the striker assembly.

270Win
May 18, 2006, 01:21 AM
Doesn't apply to a CZ, but the Ruger 10/22 manual specifically says dry firing is ok. I read somewhere that the bolt has a built in stop so that the firing pin won't overtravel.

Car Knocker
May 18, 2006, 01:23 AM
cavman,

Yup, pretty much. It's so common that Brownell's even sells a tool to repair the chamber:

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=8869&title=.22+CHAMBER+IRONING+TOOL

Diomed
May 18, 2006, 02:02 AM
rbernie -

Yep, nowadays dry firing an Enfield is not the best idea. It used to be SOP, but that was back in the day and we don't have piles of government-funded spare springs and strikers lying around...

I avoid it wherever possible. If it's something where I can't decock it before storing it - like a double shotgun - I'll do it, but I try to have snap caps in place, just in case.

billcavazos
May 18, 2006, 05:08 AM
It really depends on the type of rifle. I collect and hunt with Mausers. Mausers can be dry fired all you want. Contact the manufacturer of your weapon and see what they say. If your not sure get the dry fire caps like someone mentioned earlier. Dry firing is a very important routine for high powered rifles. I do it before shooting at the range and or hunting.

Howdy Doody
May 18, 2006, 05:15 AM
In my case I shoot a couple of Marlin lever actions and equipped them out with one piece firing pins. I use the steel ones. I dry fire a lot with them. I take the bolt completely apart fairly regularly for cleaning. I shoot BP. I have yet to notice any wear to the hole the pin protrudes through or any wear ring or anything on the firing pin either. I have however broken the two piece original front pin and a spring too. That prompted me to go with the one piece like in the original Marlins. No problems I can report with dry firing. However I would not recommend it on a rim fire.

cracked butt
May 18, 2006, 05:16 AM
Mausers can be dry fired all you want.
A properly made mauser can be dry fired all you want. I have a yugo Mauser mauser that I dry fired twice and it screwed up something enough that its no longer possible to engage the safety. Upon disassembly, I found the firing pin shoulders badly peened back from dryfiring only 2 times. Poor heat treating/machining ar probably the cause, and is one of the reasons why I am always suspect about the quality of Yugo mausers.

qajaq59
May 18, 2006, 09:20 AM
There are rifles that can be dry fired. The rub is, which ones are they. Rather then research and have to remember it is just easier, for me at least, to use a dummy round that has some resistance for the firing pin and not have to think about it.

Lou629
May 18, 2006, 10:24 AM
I have seen & heard different stories and instructions about dry-fire for years and years now. As an example, I personally own firearms where the instruction booklets say it's not a problem ( my ruger GP100 ) and then others that tell you NOT to in very clear language ( beretta 92FS ), and have rifles and shotguns where the issue isn't even addressed in the booklets that came with them. Overall, I think the best advice i ever got was from a gunsmith that had been in the business for years. He told me that he'd keep it to a minimum with centerfire, and never with a rimfire, and i've followed that advice for decades now. Obviously some dry-firing is necessary and cannot be avoided. Other than that, i'd say it's a case of lesser = better. It's always worked for me.

Howdy Doody
May 18, 2006, 12:45 PM
qajaq59s post jogged my memory a little. There is a way to dry fire all day long with a chambered shell. It starts out like this. Knock the primer out of an empty piece of brass and dab some silicone sealer in the primer pocket and let dry until it gets rubbery. chamber the empty brass and with a pencil, mark where the extractor grabs the brass. Remove brass and file a flat. reinsert brass in chamber and have the flat where the extractor grabs. The brass will now stay chambered an the extractor has nothing to grab on to. Dryfire away.:)

hksw
May 18, 2006, 01:59 PM
There is nothing wrong with dry firing and it isn't going to hurt the gun.


Mmm. IMO, for the most part, most current centerfire guns can be dry fired without much problem and damage.

In this particular case, however, rimfires are also (primarily) being discussed and for those instances, dry firing can be damaging to some rimfires. The problem being some rimfires have no meants to prevent their firing pins from striking the edge of the chamber. When this occurs, a burr may develop on the edge and affect feeding and extraction. There are exception like the 10/22 and MkII/MkIIIs as noted but for the most part, if you are not sure yours will hit the barrel or not, use a snap cap if you want to dry fire. Some folks' Buckmarks' firing pins are short enough (due to manufacturing variances) to not hit the chamber but this isn't always the case (as with my Standard and Unlimited, hadn't tried dry firing on an empty chamber with my Bullseye and I'm not willing to).

Not sure about the 452, even though I have a couple, but to play it safe, use a snap cap or spent case. (Which is what I do.)

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