Identify Colt SA Revolver


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Larry Stranz
May 23, 2006, 03:05 PM
I have a sa colt with the following markings: COLT'S PT. F.A. MFG. Co--HARTFORD CT. U.S.A. (on the barrel)
1313 D.F.C. (on cylinder) - 61313 D.F.C. (on frame) U.S. (frame) and
PAF. SEPT. 19, 1871, July. 2.-72, JAN.19-75 (all on frame)
Can anyone identify actual date of manufacture and approximate value- barrel has been shortened but in good working condition and overall condition is good (not rusty or worn badly)?

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Harve Curry
May 23, 2006, 04:17 PM
61313 is from year 1880, (62001 starts 1881 production).

Is there any numbers/marks near the trigger guard(caliber) or inside the loading gate (last 4 digits of ser.no.)?

I don't know what the letters DFC stand for. Maybe a prison??

As to value you should invest in a letter from COLT. But with a cut down barrel it will never be worth what it would have been unaltered, even if you find an original length barrel from that era. It's best to leave it and appreciate it for the condition it is in.

Old Fuff
May 23, 2006, 04:19 PM
You have a 1st. generation Colt Single Action Army Model 1873 that was made for, and sold to the Army in 1880. DFC was David F. Clark, a U.S. Government Ordnance Inspector.

Check the barrel length and see if it is 5 1/2 inches. During the late 1890's/early 1900's many of these revolvers were referbished and had the barrels shortened by the government - some by Colt, and others at Springfield Armory.

"U.S." marked Colts command some very high prices, even when altered.

OPOEFC
May 25, 2006, 01:58 AM
As Old Fluff says, You have a 1st generation Colt U.S. "artillery" model. The barrel should be 5 1/2 inches. These guns were altered by Colt & the Springfield Armory from the original 7 1/2 inch barreled Calvalry Models. The reason the parts all have different numbers is that when the original guns were turned in for reworking, all were dissembled, parts replaced or repaired and reassembled for reissue to the troops, with out any attempt to keep the same numbers together. If your gun is tight, and no rust and working good and has original smooth one piece walnut military grips it will bring about $3500 to $4000, with just a grey finish. If there is any blue left on the barrel or cylinder or case hardening colors on the from, triple that value. A Colt letter really won't do much for this guns as it will just show what is obvious - that it is a military gun. More important is to get a Springfield Research letter,or check their web site. They keep a data base of where these guns were assigned during the times they were in military use and you may find your gun went up San Juan Hill with Teddy Roosevelt. In that cane , put a zero after the above value comments. Ed

Old Fuff
May 25, 2006, 11:42 AM
The June, 2006 issue of the American Rifleman magazine has a short but detailed article on these revolvers on page 80. Interesting reading.

Harve Curry
May 25, 2006, 08:11 PM
The way Larry wrote ...... " barrel has been shortened but in good working condition and overall condition is good."........

It sounded to me like not done very well.

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