Firearms in science fiction novels...


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default
May 27, 2006, 12:43 AM
HK "shard pistol", Nemex autoloader with proprietary propellant, and Philips electromagnetic flechette gun (with field-reversal setting that would retrieve projectiles from people shot with it, presumably causing further damage and saving the user some ammo money) in Richard K. Morgan's "Altered Carbon".

Disposable Russian "Chain Gun" (it actually shot chains, if I recall correctly) in William Gibson's "Idoru" (or maybe it was "All Tomorrow's Parties").

The Stainless Steel Rat's .75 automatic (!). Funny that in Harry Harrison's Esperanto-speaking future near-utopia they still had non-metric caliber names. You'd expect it to be called "19mm".

The "Ballester-Molina" and "Cutts-Maudslay wind-up automatic carbines" in Gibson and Sterling's "The Difference Engine". I always pictured the "Ballester-Molina" ("the infernal thing had cocked itself") as some sort of automatic revolver like a Webley-Fosbery. Imagine my surprise when I got into real guns and found out there was such a thing, by name at least, but it was a grip safety-less 1911 knockoff.

Technically some of these aren't "firearms" per se, but I've tried to limit it to projectile weapons. Any others those not afraid to be exposed as geeks would care to mention?

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Billll
May 27, 2006, 01:08 AM
I remember the 2mm needler, but not the stories. It appeared in several. Ringworld?
My favorite was an ordinary 1911 that figured in a gunfight on the moon. The good guy, whose gun it was, stood on a ridge, some 100 yds away from the baddie, and let him empty the magazine at him. Figuring, correctly, that someone who had never fired a pistol before would be a terrible shot, he then engaged the villan in arguement for a few minutes.
Orbital velocity on the moon is 1100 FPS. Muzzle velo for the 1911 is also 1100 FPS. Aiming at the horizon will get you 1 orbit from the bullets. Yup. Shot himself in the back.

default
May 27, 2006, 01:26 AM
Hi Billll, thanks for the reply. I don't think the needlers were from "Ringworld" but it seems that some of the Stainless Steel Rat books and "Neuromancer" had "needlers" or "needleguns". Speaking of "Neuromancer", I believe the main character was offered a rental Tokarev by the proprietor of a weapon kiosk in Tokyo early in the novel.

"Ringworld", though a fine book, had some comparatively lame weapons (Slaver disintegrator, sonic stunners, etc., but the "variable-sword" - a retractable monofilament cable encased in a rigidity-enhancing force field, extended from a hilt, with an LED at the business end, was pretty neat).

As for the moon guy, I guess he should have stayed "old-school 1911" and stuck with 230-grain ball. :)

sm
May 27, 2006, 01:54 AM
Anybody have any idea what gun Professor used in Heinlein's The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress?

...Professor Produced a handgun and, firing over heads, picked off 3 bodyguards... Chapter 5

homeka45
May 27, 2006, 02:14 AM
Pardon me for including hand and energy weapons.
Delameter Blasters and Needlers from the Lensman Series.
The Slaver Soft Weapon.
Darth Mauls' Double light saber.
Mobile Infantry Marauder Suit.

default
May 27, 2006, 02:27 AM
You're pardoned. I'd forgotten about the "soft weapon". Communicator, translator, laser, variable-sword, rocket sled, and among other things total mass-conversion WMD all in some sort of compact shape-shifting man (or roughly man-like creature)-portable package. Good one! :)

Husker1911
May 27, 2006, 03:53 AM
Please pardon my vagueness when I describe this scifi story, I don't remember many details. I read this book as a kid in the mid-Sixties, please help me out if it rings a bell with you.

Book involves a renegade Earth colony that's broken away and has colonized Mars. Trouble is, females are rendered impotent living there, so they engage in occasional forays to Earth, to capture/kidnap fresh females to invigorate their colonie's birth rate. On these missions, the Martian colonists utilize a non-lethal projectile firearm that shot out a sticky, net-like payload that spread out as it flew threw the air, and captured its target uninjured.

It was good stuff to a youngster a generation and a half ago.

Sindawe
May 27, 2006, 04:22 AM
I remember the 2mm needler, but not the stories. It appeared in several. Ringworld? Needlers have been around in fiction for as long as I can remember. First encountered them in F.M. Busby's Rissa Kerguelen 30 years ago, and I know they predate that.

For firearms as we know them, my favorite is Lucille Gallegos Kropotkin's pair of Gabbett-Fairfax Mars pistols....Professor Produced a handgun and, firing over heads, picked off 3 bodyguards...'Prolly a Glock of some sort. :neener:

But the ultimate in "firearms" would have to be the asteroid burner powered by solar flares described in the Ringworld novels.

Gas Operated
May 27, 2006, 07:24 AM
Hi Billll, thanks for the reply. I don't think the needlers were from "Ringworld" but it seems that some of the Stainless Steel Rat books and "Neuromancer" had "needlers" or "needleguns". Speaking of "Neuromancer", I believe the main character was offered a rental Tokarev by the proprietor of a weapon kiosk in Tokyo early in the novel.
It was a 50 year old Vietnamese knockoff of a Walther PPK, in .22LR, wasn't it.
There was also the S&W riot gun with a fiberglass barrel.

But the ultimate in "firearms" would have to be the asteroid burner powered by solar flares described in the Ringworld novels.
"With such a weapon I could boil the Earth to vapor." -Chmeee.

nelson133
May 27, 2006, 08:14 AM
I too read the book about stealing women from earth, the weapon was called a tangler.

dracphelan
May 27, 2006, 09:27 AM
Well, in the Posleen books (Hymn Before Battle, Gust Front, Hell's Faire, When the Devil Dances) by John Ringo (http://www.johnringo.com), there are all of our modern firearms alsong with rail guns, pistols that use a tiny amount of antimatter to launch a depleted uranium round, hyper-velocity missiles and tanks with metalstorm (http://www.metalstorm.com/) packs.

Euclidean
May 27, 2006, 09:40 AM
Who needs firearms when you have these?

http://www.xscapesprops.com/star%20trek%20props/fc%20phaser%20signature%20edition%20MR-ST-102S.jpg (http://www.memory-alpha.org/en/index.php/Phaser#Phaser_type-1)

Phantom Warrior
May 27, 2006, 09:43 AM
In David Weber's Honor Harrington series you see pulsers (3mm darts fired at a couple thousand feet per second), 10mm pistols ("antiques" used only for dueling), and the main character is partial to a reproduction 1911 .45 ACP. It's an exceptional series, I recommend it highly.

kjeff50cal
May 27, 2006, 09:53 AM
How about the guns the Martians had that shot bees (Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles)..... this is for those of you that have a "bee season":p .

wheelgunslinger
May 27, 2006, 10:13 AM
Some Sci-Fi book I read a long time ago had a Purdy 12 gauge English Double barrel that turned into a sword when he faced a dragon.

And, of course, the penultimate Sci-Fi weapons: The pair of revolvers used by Stephen King's character Roland Deschain in the Dark Tower series.

Korimyr the Rat
May 27, 2006, 11:00 AM
On these missions, the Martian colonists utilize a non-lethal projectile firearm that shot out a sticky, net-like payload that spread out as it flew threw the air, and captured its target uninjured.

Heh. Now tell me that ain't appropriate, considering what they were using it for...

default
May 27, 2006, 11:06 AM
kjeff50cal - ha! Was that in the book, or only in the 1980 miniseries? I vaguely remembered the bee gun but wasn't sure if my recollections were accurate as it was a fairly bizarre concept for a gun. It's the second-most famous bee weapon I can think of, after the dogs guarding Mr. Burns' mansion in "The Simpsons", which of course had bees in their mouths, and when they barked they shot bees at you.

Gas Operated - good memory, I believe you are correct. And then there was "Count Zero", where the protagonist carried a "S&W Tactical .408" (had to look up the name of the gun online) with a "xenon projector" illumination device. See, not only did William Gibson predict the internet, he predicted the Surefire X200.

Thanks for all the replies, folks!

armoredman
May 27, 2006, 11:15 AM
David Drake's nitrogen cooled powerguns, came in a battle rifle, subgun, tribarrel, and tank cannon. oh, yeah...

The incredible Sten series by Alan Cole and Chris Bunch, with the willygun, using a laser to accellerate a 1mm ball of Imperium X material, containing a minute amount of Anti-Matter 2.

oneshooter
May 27, 2006, 11:16 AM
Mobile Infantry Marauder Suit.

I WANT ONE!!!!!!

Oneshooter
Livin in Texas

lee n. field
May 27, 2006, 11:50 AM
Book involves a renegade Earth colony that's broken away and has colonized Mars. Trouble is, females are rendered impotent living there, so they engage in occasional forays to Earth, to capture/kidnap fresh females to invigorate their colonie's birth rate. On these missions, the Martian colonists utilize a non-lethal projectile firearm that shot out a sticky, net-like payload that spread out as it flew threw the air, and captured its target uninjured.


SciFi YASID (yet another story id) -- that sounds like Alan Nourse's Raiders From the Rings (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0007FLA7K/103-7977613-6805404?v=glance&n=283155) Females weren't "impotent" (whatever that might mean), but no females were born off Earth, so they had to be kidnapped.

woerm
May 27, 2006, 12:24 PM
Sindwe, et al

the Prof's gun is IIRC a 7.65, Browning it turns up later in a Bonsai tree terrium (still slinging heat)in the Cat that Walked Though Walls as well. The make/model is not described but as he was from Argentina/South America it probably was a Baretta or a Browning vs unlikely a Colt.

r

fixyurgun
May 27, 2006, 12:34 PM
Has anyone considered the effect vacuum might have on the ammo? jim

Husker1911
May 27, 2006, 12:55 PM
vacuum?
"Has anyone considered the effect vacuum might have on the ammo? jim"

Smokeless powder contains the oxygen component to allow cartridges to fire and ignite in a vacuum. (I believe!)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Lee n. field, thank you for the link, I'll check into it. Again, pardon my vague recollections of the story, most of the details have leaked from my gray matter.

MillCreek
May 27, 2006, 01:04 PM
My gray matter is leaky, too, but was it in some of the Larry Niven or Niven/Pournelle writings that described the anesthetic dart gun? Was this, too, called a needler? I thought I recalled that it was used by law enforcement, and fired a stream of crystalline ultra rapid acting anesthetic. The needles penetrated the skin and the subject rapidly became unconscious.

Third_Rail
May 27, 2006, 01:05 PM
woerm, sounds right to me.

Hyunchback
May 27, 2006, 01:08 PM
Billll wrote...

My favorite was an ordinary 1911 that figured in a gunfight on the moon. The good guy, whose gun it was, stood on a ridge, some 100 yds away from the baddie, and let him empty the magazine at him. Figuring, correctly, that someone who had never fired a pistol before would be a terrible shot, he then engaged the villan in arguement for a few minutes.
Orbital velocity on the moon is 1100 FPS. Muzzle velo for the 1911 is also 1100 FPS. Aiming at the horizon will get you 1 orbit from the bullets. Yup. Shot himself in the back.

Hate to tinkle in your space suit but...

I've always had the impression that what launced the bullet was the burning of the gun powder. No atmosphere to speak of, certainly not one with enough oxygen to breathe, on the moon. You pull the trigger on a 1911 and I'm figuring you'll either feel the click through your space suit glove/hand and nothing more.

The fulminate of mercury in the primer would have no oxygen to bind with. The gun powder would have no oxygen to bind with. No oxygen no fire. No fire no explosion. No explosion no bullet lanched.

Add to that the temperature we are dealing with. If they are in full sunlight the gun would already be baked to several hundred degrees on any scale you name. If not in full sunlight the gun would be so cold the barrel would shatter before the bullet could be expelled (assuming you provided the oxygen to burn the powder).

Add in that the bullet's velocity is the velocity measured in... AIR. In a vacuum the velocity would be MUCH higher with no resistance other than that of gravity to impact the projectile. Remember the first lunar landing and the golf ball? Lower gravity and no atmosphere and that clumsy hit soared better than anything Tiger Woods can pray for.

Don't feel bad. A LOT of rather interesting stories bear little relation to actual physics although some elements flat out offend my sensibilities.

For example: In L. Ron Hubbard's "Battlefield Earth". The heros find some well preserved Thompson submachine guns (and the author makes a point of saying this) WITHOUT a compensator on the muzzle.

Well, those brave earthmen figure out that if they turn the gun sideways that nasty muzzle jump will help them strafe side to side instead of giving them muzzle climb!

SAY WHAT?

I'm not the brightest bulb in the flash cube but even I could see how silly that was, even if I was stupid enough to buy the book at the grocery store.

Since then I've always recalled that portion of the book anytime Scientology is mentioned. If the jerk couldn't understand bullet physics and firearms I'll be dam*ed (literally?) if I let him try to sell me a religion.

sterling180
May 27, 2006, 01:18 PM
You may or may not have read the Jurrasic Park novel.(I have and I loved it.)If you did,you would know that the Professional Hunter-who is called Robert Muldoon-is a professional game hunter from the UK who had been working in Africa,prior to being recruited by John Hammond to work in his newly-created Jurrasic Park Island-on the Costa Rican island of Isla Nublar.

Anyway in the novel version, Muldoon has access to a weapon far more powerful than his SPAS-12 Shotgun and his holstered-pistol-that was shown in the movie version.This weapon is either a bazooka,a rocket-launcher or a grenade-launcher and was ordered to be custom-made for his use in Jurrasic Park, to despatch dangerous dinosaurs with, if ever there was a disaster like the one that occurred later on in both the novel and movie.

He takes INGEN lawyer Donald Gennaro(that guy who is eaten on the toilet-in the movie.) for a ride in a gasoline-powered jeep, to find Dennis Nedry-and when they find Nedry's jeep, they find his bloated corpse next to the jeep.So Muldoon opens the back door and removes the piece of metal-tubing and it's ammunition and proceeds with Gennaro back to their jeep-and they start heading back-I think-to either the Raptors pen or the visitors centre.Muldoon kills a few raptors with the launcher, but unfortunately he hands the ammo to Gennaro- who acted as his loader-but Gennaro craps his pants and runs away leaving old Muldoon with an empty launcher at the mercey of few angry, very much-alive raptors.

I don't understand why Speilberg did'nt give Muldoons character a rocket or grenade-launcher, in addition to his Spas12 shotgun-in the movie version.Muldoon wasn't supposed to die,Hammond was.

Gas Operated
May 27, 2006, 01:25 PM
Gunpowder, both smokeless and black, is self-oxidizing. It requires no air, which is in short supply inside cartridges.
Primers haven't used mercury fulminate in decades - the current chemical of choice is lead styphnate, which is also self-oxidizing.
The Russians had a 23mm autocannon on one of their space stations. I presume they wouldn't have bothered if it wouldn't have worked.

As for the hot/cold gun issue, in the absence of air and therefore convection, it will take longer for the gun to heat up or cool down, since only through radiation can it gain or lose heat.

Hyunchback
May 27, 2006, 01:29 PM
Sterling 180 wrote...

I don't understand why Speilberg did'nt give Muldoons character a rocket or grenade-launcher, in addition to his Spas12 shotgun-in the movie version.Muldoon wasn't supposed to die,Hammond was.
sterling180 is offline Report Bad Post

Can you say "Hollywood Anti-gun, anti-hunter agenda?"

NukemJim
May 27, 2006, 01:33 PM
I've always had the impression that what launced the bullet was the burning of the gun powder.

True

No atmosphere to speak of, certainly not one with enough oxygen to breathe, on the moon. You pull the trigger on a 1911 and I'm figuring you'll either feel the click through your space suit glove/hand and nothing more.


I believe you have figured wrong on this one. The gunpowder provides it's own oxidizer. Otherwise you would not be able to fire a gun underwater (SAFETY NOTE, Do not attempt this unless the manufacturer of your firearm has ok'd it. The only one I know of (there may be others) is Glock for their 9mm handguns using a special part with FMJ ONLY) if you do a search this subject has come up before on THR.

Add to that the temperature we are dealing with. If they are in full sunlight the gun would already be baked to several hundred degrees on any scale you name. If not in full sunlight the gun would be so cold the barrel would shatter before the bullet could be expelled

The points about temperature may be valid I do not know enough to say.

NukemJim

lee n. field
May 27, 2006, 01:33 PM
Lots of sf-nal guns.

Spider Robinson had a throwaway line in one of his novels, about a terrorist using a commercially available disposable gun -- I picture a very simple magazine fed autoloader with ammo preloaded in a sealed magazine. Probably full auto (Sten simple).

El Neil (http://www.lneilsmith.org) loves personal weapons with a passion, and they show up in all of his novels. They range from real (Win Bear's S&W .41) to fanciful (his wife's Webley Electic, shooting .11 steel needles via EM induction), to unlikely (Sedrich Fireclaw's handmade, personally invented black powder cartridge revolver.).

RAH had one of his characters pack a "Skoda fletchette pistol" in her purse in Number of the Beast.

"Gunz won't fire in space."

Sounds like a job for Mythbusters. :-)

Carl N. Brown
May 27, 2006, 01:47 PM
Also mercury fulminate is one of those explosive compounds that
breaks down producing heat and gas all by its lonesome.

Black gunpowder is the compound potassium nitrate KNO3 plus
charcoal carbon C and sulphur S. The O3 in KNO3 is three atoms of
oxygen, which "burn" the carbon and sulphur, even under water,
even in a vacuum. Even in a hole in solid rock as blasting powder.
Even in a gun barrel surrounded by steel and plugged at one end by
brass and the other end by lead.

Now, in the TV series Firefly, the character Jayne had a rifle Vera,
that apparently used oxygen from the atmo to burn the fuel in
the cartridge, but that's sci-fi. Since three-fourths of gunpowder
is oxidizer, a cartridge that could draw oxygen from the air could
pack a 50 BMG punch in 45 ACP package.

Devonai
May 27, 2006, 03:08 PM
Most of the alien races in the upcoming sequel to my novel carry "energy weapons," and I intentionally left the specifics out because I didn't feel like trying to come up with something that kept with the science part of the fiction.

However, a few guys do carry projectile weapons that I went into in some detail:

“That’s reassuring,” said Richter. “Say, what kind of pistol is this?”
“It’s a Res-ZorCon ‘Legionnaire.’ It’s the last of the enhanced projectile pistols. They stopped making them in favor of the new plasma burst weapons about twenty years ago.”
“Is it obsolete?”
“It’s obsolescent. It’ll still put a one centimeter hole in you at a hundred meters. I carry it because some of the new bad guys out there are dumb enough to wear armor that is weak against physical projectiles. Energy dispersal armor isn’t exactly well suited against them, no pun intended.”
“No wonder those Rakhar mercs went down so easily.”
“I take it your weapons use combustible chemical propellants?”
“Yeah. And yours?”
“Mine does too, but there are also four microscopic superconductive magnets embedded in each bullet. There are particle accelerator rails instead of rifling within the barrel. They impart a spin on the round as well as boost the speed by a factor of three.”
“Muzzle velocity?”
“Fifteen hundred meters per second.”
“Holy ****.”


Later, the character describing her pistol also introduces her friends to a couple of the carbine variants, which are full-auto and have higher magazine capacities.

tellner
May 27, 2006, 03:09 PM
Steve Perry's spetsdods and .177 umpteen-thousand-rpm carbines.

fixyurgun
May 27, 2006, 03:24 PM
My wondering about the effects of vacuum was not if the primer/gunpowder would burn. I wonder if a cartridge loaded at normal air preesure wouldn't push the bullet or primer out, when exposed to vacuum.
I remember reading a short story years ago ,where a man in a suit tucked a bottle of booze under his arm,cycled thru the air- lock and kablooey.
ideas? jim

Tsonda
May 27, 2006, 03:52 PM
Lee,

Mr. Smith has moved to lnealsmith.org now.

Hyunchback
May 27, 2006, 04:06 PM
Okay, I may be wrong on the points of oxidant contained within the powder and the primer compound. Chemistry isn't my major area of expertise.

I don't feel that my points about the temperature extremes is invalid, nor the different physics of a bullet fired in a vacuum vs. fired under earth atmosphere.

Putting that aside right now the person firing the bullet, assuming the bullet launched at approximately the orbital velocity of the moon would still be very unlikely to shoot himself in the back.

The moon is not perfectly flat. It has ridges around the craters and other surface features. Assuming he person firing it was standing on the highest point on the moon it is somewhat remotely possible but I sure as hell wouldn't bet my life or money on it happening. Shells vary in their velocities. A little too much, a little too little and the bullet either escapes orbit or plows to the surface short of the guy who fired it. He would also pretty much have to stand still, not moving off his spot or the odds of the bullet hitting him would be (pardon the expression) astronomical.

lee n. field
May 27, 2006, 07:38 PM
lneilsmith.org now

Fixed.

I knew that, just fumbled typing it in. Some snafu with the hosting was behind the change, is my understanding.

BTW, if you're a fan of his work, you might want to check out "Roswell, Texas" at Big Head Press (http://www.bigheadpress.com/). He's got some hints of that version of Texas in the novel American Zone. As you might expect, it's full of tough hombres and hombre-ettes packing heat (heat appropriate to an alternate history 1945, where LiberTexas was never a part of the USoA). An analog of Win Bear's dad is (so far) the major character.

akodo
May 27, 2006, 07:42 PM
now maybe I am wrong, but my thermos to keep my coffee hot or uses a vaccumm between the laters. No air particles to colide with the surface, leach heat, then leave. Same way fast wind makes things cool faster, more air particles colide with whatever, each leaches some heat and is gone, quickly replaced by another.

Seems to me in space your stuff would be very well insulated, except for the stuff in contact with the surface of the moon, spaceship, or what have you. Sure, space is not a total vaaccumm there is some stuff bopping around, plus there is a small loss due to radient energy, but your gun is going to stay pretty much the same temp all the time. Hell, overheating from fast firing may be a bigger problem.

Regarding overheating in 'direct' sunlight. My understanding is that the earth is the temp it is becasue our atmosphere creates a greenhouse effect. Planets with their own atmosphere, like venus, get hot as hell. (or if you are a LOT closer to the sun) however, in most circumstances, the sun won't be causing any problems.

GEM
May 27, 2006, 07:47 PM
This is obscure from the Imperium series by Keith Laumer. It was an ultimate stopper concealed weapon. A smooth half egg like gadet worn on your wrist and under your sleeve. It shot a short range hi pressure blob of some liquid or gas that would knock you over and cause lots of impact damage.

Car Knocker
May 27, 2006, 07:54 PM
"Because of the lack of any atmosphere, the temperature of the Moon's surface varies between -180° C and +110° C.

http://www.oarval.org/section3_7.htm

It would appear that the Sun DOES cause heating in vacuum.

Stiletto Null
May 27, 2006, 08:04 PM
Lunar surface temps:
Maximum surface temperature, 123°C. Minimum surface temperature, -233°C. (lol, ninja'd by Knocker)

I would be a lot more worried about overchilling than overheating. Some sort of thermal control would definitely be a good idea, though, at the very least a climate-controlled holster—short vacuum soak to fire followed by re-holstering isn't going to allow enough of a temperature differential to be a hazard.

I would be much more worried about its lubricants outgassing.

Cosmoline
May 27, 2006, 08:37 PM
Who needs firearms when you have these?

A dustbuster? I've got one already.

Cosmoline
May 27, 2006, 08:44 PM
The maximum ground temp on Earth can get hot enough to fry eggs. It's not really proper to compare our AIR temp with the Moon's GROUND temp.

dfariswheel
May 27, 2006, 09:08 PM
My favorites:
Mike Resnick's Leprechaun gun from "Stalking the Unicorn".

F. Paul Wilson's Ibizan Combustion Double Barrel Autoshotgun, firing number-eight end-over-end cylindrical shot, from "Healer".

Dean Ing's 30mm rocket launcher disguised to look like a camera, and a commando handgun that includes a trigger that cuts the finger off an unauthorized user, from "Systemic Shock" and "Wild Country".

Possibly the best of all: Timothy Zahn's COBRA guerrilla soldiers. Cyborgs with unbreakable bones, super-human speed and strength, and a complete weapons suite ranging from finger-tip lasers, to an anti-armor laser in one leg, to sonic weapons and enhanced vision and hearing.
From "COBRA".
The big question: How do you send a soldier home to civilian life with enough non-removable weapons to out-gun a company and a computer implanted in his brain that can open fire on it's own if IT feels threatened.

Elmer Snerd
May 28, 2006, 01:27 AM
In David Weber's Honor Harrington series you see pulsers (3mm darts fired at a couple thousand feet per second) It's more like a couple thousand meters per second, driven by artificial gravity technology. Military pulsers may use explosive darts. There are also flechette guns which are basically uber-shotguns that drive bunches-o'-projectiles with artificial gravity.

The Strike Force soldiers in David Drake's Redliners (http://www.baen.com/library/067187733X/067187733X.htm) used "stingers" that fired 15-grain pellets at 10,000 fps.

Lois McMaster Bujold's Vorkosigan series has "nerve disruptors". Their beams very painfully destroy nerve tissue. Grazes usually result in permanent deadening of sensory nerves. Solid hits usually result in permanent paralysis of that area. Brain or spine hits are almost always fatal. They are highly restricted or illegal dang near everywhere.

I can't remember the title, but years ago I read a back-cover blurb about some sort of time-based weapon that retroactively destroyed things. If you destroyed something with it, it would also remove all history of that object's existence.

Kor
May 28, 2006, 03:23 AM
+1 for Steve Perry; also check out The Trinity Vector, which features a S&W M66 and a Coonan 1911-type .357Mag(yes, that's right!) semi-auto, The Digital Effect, which features a future-tech stun-dart-firing Taurus air pistol and a vintage Thompson sub-gun, and the Stellar Ranger books, which feature a "Smith & Wesson CGLS, old when his grandfather owned it. The stainless-steel semiauto used a magazine powered by a double cylinder of highly compressed and esoteric gasses, a special enzyme added to keep them from liquefying. The projectiles were teflex-coated lead starfish bullets. When one of the bullets hit something the consistency of tissue or harder, they expanded from 9mm to 15mm in the shape of a starfish, even at the modest 300 meters/second subsonic velocities at which they flew. The magazine held only six shots before he had to reload."

Another +1 for L. Neil Smith - see Henry Martyn, which mentions such vintage weapons as "steyraugs," "remwins," "arpeegies," "smith-wessons," "Effen Effayals," and a Walther .22LR PP; and Pallas, which features a .45 Win Mag LAR Grizzly and the "Ngu Departure" 10mm semiauto pistol. Actually, ALL of L. Neil's books feature guns prominently, with the possible exception of his three Star Wars/Lando Calrissian novels.

Yet another +1 for Timothy Zahn's Cobra series - not especially flashy or action-packed, especially compared to the likes of Drake or Ringo, but very well thought-out.

Since I haven't seen them mentioned yet, here's a shout out for Michael Z. Williamson's Freehold and The Weapon;

And finally, A.E. Van Vogt's classic The Weapon Makers and The Weapon Shops of Isher("The right to buy weapons is the right to be free"), featuring the "Weapon Shop Special," an energy gun capable of destroying any material object within its range, which also shields its user from energy weapons up to a "small atomic cannon" - but which is unable to be used to commit aggression or murder. I've sometimes thought that if I were to open my own gun store, I'd like to call it "Isher Guns" just for the heck of it.

arthurcw
May 28, 2006, 03:41 AM
I love the Honor Harrington Series as well. Best use of a weapon in there was her sneaking her Old Chemical Powered Slug Thrower (1911 replica) right by a BG casue they were only scanning for energy powered weapons. :neener:

LoneCoon
May 28, 2006, 04:04 AM
Personally, I'd like to see someone not listen to Reason.

You know, the Gatling type 3mm Hypervelocity Railgun System from Snowcrash.

Husker1911
May 28, 2006, 05:08 AM
Not exactly firearms, but Frank Herbert's "Dune" featured shields being defeated by old-fashioned and out dated nuclear weapons. How silly to forget them.

Phantom Warrior
May 28, 2006, 07:39 AM
It's more like a couple thousand meters per second, driven by artificial gravity technology. Military pulsers may use explosive darts. There are also flechette guns which are basically uber-shotguns that drive bunches-o'-projectiles with artificial gravity.


I THOUGHT it was meters, but I couldn't remember offhand. Thanks for the save. All but one of my Honor Harrington books are back in the States, so I haven't read them in a while. :(



love the Honor Harrington Series as well. Best use of a weapon in there was her sneaking her Old Chemical Powered Slug Thrower (1911 replica) right by a BG casue they were only scanning for energy powered weapons.


Yeah. :D

G36-UK
May 28, 2006, 08:44 AM
Don't know if graphic novels count, but one gun I liked was the Solenoid Quench Gun from Battle Angel Alita.

The gun is about eight feet long, and has a foot-long magazine. It's described as an "Electro-Magnetic Acceleration Launcher" firing a "Solenoid AP Round" at 5KM/Sec. The power required must be supplied by a larger supply aircraft overhead, and the gun can hover like the craft, aiding in recoil absorption and targeting.

GLOCK19XDSC
May 28, 2006, 09:42 AM
William C. Dietz had throwaway Glocks in "Bodyguard." IIRC, the main character carried a 9mm BHP.

sacp81170a
May 28, 2006, 10:37 AM
How 'bout some really big guns? The 200cm Hellbores mounted by the Mark XXXIII Bolo pumped out more than 5 megatons/sec. and were equal to the armament carried by a heavy battlecruiser. Gotta love those Boloes. :D They could take out spacecraft in a "medium" orbit.

armoredman
May 28, 2006, 11:20 AM
Bolos rock - megaton/sec firepower!
Honor Harrington is fantastic...wish he'd write another one.
An odd duck weapon is in the 13 Spaceborne series, carbines that use batteries to fire snippets of wire, off spools, called "zippers". Also had Dupoy "cough guns", rocket assisted sniper rifles.

Anyone like how Brian Daley managed to slip in an antique in his excellent trilogy of Hobart Floyt and Alacrity Fitzhugh,i.e., Floyts' Webly, loaded with "Chicago popcorn"? Great sci-fi series.

'Card
May 28, 2006, 11:21 AM
Steve Perry's spetsdods...
Bingo. Small wrist-mounted trigger-in-the-palm dart guns, loaded with an instant nerve toxin that crippled the target for 3 years. The perfect non-lethal weapon for concealment and rapid, instinctive aiming.

They are a prominent feature in a book called The Man Who Never Missed, which is an outstanding story about what one man can accomplish against an oppressive and overwhelming government.

default
May 28, 2006, 12:37 PM
Wow, this thread has longer legs than I expected! Thanks for all the great replies, tons of cool stuff I hadn't heard of. LoneCoon, good reference on "Snow Crash". "Reason" was one of the more high-concept "guns" I've encountered in a book, had I remembered it at the time would have definitely gone in my initial post. Thanks again, everyone!

'Card
May 28, 2006, 01:20 PM
Neal Stephenson's (Snow Crash author) gun descriptions are always great. My favorite is the long, loving description of the water-cooled Vickers machine gun in Cryptonomicon. It was a gun with "infrastructure". :cool:

lee n. field
May 28, 2006, 02:25 PM
How 'bout some really big guns?

I have a particular liking for the Wunderland Treatymaker.

kjeff50cal
May 28, 2006, 03:09 PM
kjeff50cal - ha! Was that in the book, or only in the 1980 miniseries? I vaguely remembered the bee gun but wasn't sure if my recollections were accurate as it was a fairly bizarre concept for a gun. It's the second-most famous bee weapon I can think of, after the dogs guarding Mr. Burns' mansion in "The Simpsons", which of course had bees in their mouths, and when they barked they shot bees at you.



I read the book a millenia ago in middle-school but the bee-gun was in the book (I think it was used against the Second Expedition).

akodo
May 28, 2006, 03:11 PM
also remember, the moon doesn't spin like the earth, the bit that is facing the earth now is facing the earth all the time.

This means that whatever is exposed to the sun has a LONG time to be exposed to the sun, and hence build up to 110c, or whatever it was.

This is totally different than hopping off of a spaceship and have your gun immediately get unbearably hot or cold

The_Future
May 28, 2006, 03:29 PM
Do wargames count?
As the Space Marines from Warhammer 40K have some awsome weapons such as Bolter that fire .75 caliber self-propeled missiles that explode on impact, and have full body armor powered by a small nuclear powerplant on their back

Phantom Warrior
May 28, 2006, 03:32 PM
Honor Harrington is fantastic...wish he'd write another one.


Indeed. I was pleasantly surprised to see him maintain quality writing through an ELEVENTH novel. Any idea when the next one is actually due? Since "At All Costs" came out only last November I have the sinking feeling it's going to be a while.

tellner
May 28, 2006, 04:19 PM
Lois Bujold has a nice assortment in her "Miles Vorkosigan" stories


Sonic Stunner - shoot first, ask questions later
Nerve disruptor - fry anything coated in myelin, a horror weapon
Plasma Arc - when it absolutely, positively has to be french-fried in the next half second
Needle Gun - full auto flechette pistol
Gravitic Imploder - too horrible for pictures


One of the coolest things about it is that over time countermeasures are developed for each weapon. The race between offense and defense continues.

Wes Janson
May 28, 2006, 04:28 PM
William C. Dietz had throwaway Glocks in "Bodyguard." IIRC, the main character carried a 9mm BHP

Are you positive? I seem to recall them being something else, maybe Beretta? It's been a while since I've read it, and I can't seem to find the book unfortunately. I do seem to remember a reference to a .44 Magnum, though.

What I really enjoyed were the weapons of Halo and Halo 2. The M6D pistol, firing 12.7mm x 40 "semi-armor-piercing, high-explosive rounds" was quite popular. But I always thought that the M90 Shotgun would make for an interesting real-world weapon. Firing 8 gauge 3.5in Magnum buckshot, it would need a really good compensator/recoil pad, methinks, to be comfortable to shoot.

G36-UK
May 28, 2006, 06:51 PM
Do wargames count?
As the Space Marines from Warhammer 40K have some awsome weapons such as Bolter that fire .75 caliber self-propeled missiles that explode on impact, and have full body armor powered by a small nuclear powerplant on their back

Yeah, I forgot about them. In Dan Abnett's "Traitor General", Commissar Gaunt has two chrome bolt pistols.

The nastiest 40k guns I can think of are the Tyranid guns, and the Necron Gauss Weapons.

The 'Nid's guns are living symbiotes that are part of their wielders. Each of them have nasty methods of killing people.

The Barbed Strangler fires a seed-pod that almost instantly grows into a lethal plant-like organism that rips apart almost anything in it's way.

The Deathspitter fires symbiotic creatures that are launched screaming towards the target, exploding into an extremely corrosive acid on impact.

The Fleshborer fires borer beetles that eat thier way into a target until they die.

The Devourer fires malformed Rippers that eat through neurological tissue, quickly yet painfully eating their way to the brain and spinal cords.

The Gauss guns, on the other hand, are nasty in yet another way. Each of the guns (Flayer, Blaster, Cannon, Heavy Cannon, Flux Arc), work on the same principle, pulling a target towards it on a molecular level. This effective way of killing people flays them one layer at a time, giving a vicious yet quickly-ended death.

NMshooter
May 28, 2006, 08:21 PM
Heinlein had S&W M36s, M1911s, and a .25 Beretta (can't remember if it was a M950 or a M21) just to name a few handguns off the top of my head.

H. Beam Piper featured a 10mm Colt-Argentine, and numerous other firearms up to 90mm in his stories.

Give me a powergun any day, though. 1cm SMG for preference.:D

Chuck Dye
May 28, 2006, 08:37 PM
In David Brin’s The Practice Effect, all weapons are a hoot-if they have had enough practice. I could go for a palmable needler that functions when fed any available scrap metal.

Ziryo
May 28, 2006, 08:37 PM
Not exactly firearms, but Frank Herbert's "Dune" featured shields being defeated by old-fashioned and out dated nuclear weapons. How silly to forget them.

Hmm? The use of atomics against humans is a major no-no (planetary obliteration is the punishment.) The only use of an atomic I can recall is near the end of Dune when an atomic was used to blow a hole in the Shield Wall to permit a major sandstorm into the basin where the opposing forces were located to decimate their shields.

default
May 28, 2006, 08:53 PM
As I recall, in "Dune", shields would stop projectiles above a certain speed. If struck by the beam from a "lasgun", the result could be anything from the mutual destruction of the shield wearer and shooter to a blast that would, after the fact, be forensically indistinguishable from a nuclear explosion. Kind of a convoluted backdrop by the author, but it did allow him to create a plausible feudal future where martial arts and edged weapons were the state of the art, despite the existence of firearms, nuclear explosives, and powerful lasers.

Ridge
May 28, 2006, 09:00 PM
I'm a ghosthead,and I had to mention this.

The Ultimate weapon has to be a Proton Pack from the movie Ghostbusters

Those things can go on for 5,000 years (That's the half life of the power cells)

Phyphor
May 28, 2006, 09:15 PM
Honor Harrington is fantastic...wish he'd write another one.

No kidding,


I DID wonder once, what gun for treecat? (Not to hunt them, but to equip them.... and I wonder if you could get some 4-fisted John Woo style action out of them? :neener: )

History Nut
May 29, 2006, 12:49 AM
"Rocket Ship Galileo" by Heinlein. M-1 Garand

Kaylee
May 29, 2006, 01:09 PM
Hello, My name is Kaylee and I am a geek.
Hi Kaylee
It all started so innocently. My parents took me to see The Empire Strikes Back when I was seven. Next thing I knew I had a crush on a whiny little blonde kid with a laser sword and was listening to wisdom from a little green rubber puppet. Then things got really bad...
:p

I have to admit, the "Listen to Reason" bit from Snow Crash has to be my favorite firearm discussion bit ever in a novel. :D

This is from Erma Felna - a story I found when I was like 12 once upon a time. Lots of cats and mice and foxes and suchlike whooping up on bunny rabbits. With spaceships. And guns. :)

The neat thing was, the author was giving everybody M4s before M4s were cool:

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y34/Faerfaeniel/props/erma_m4.gif



So far as any sci-fi weapon.. I'd trade my Smith in for one of those little "cricket" phasers any day of the week. Something that can do anything from make someone a little woozy to vaporize 'em entirely, all in tiny flat little package? Talk about the ultimate CCW. :D (of course... lightsabers sound like more fun. :p )

And one of these days.. I just gotta build a "Firefly" pistol around a Smith 36, or an M41 around an SBR'd Thompson and 870. Now that would be a fun range toy. :p

GLOCK19XDSC
May 29, 2006, 02:13 PM
Wes Janson,

Concerning "Bodyguard" by William C. Dietz: They were called "Glock Disposables" on page eight of the paperback. There may have been others, though. Also, a correction: the main character carried "something" chambered in .38 Super, Presumably a 1911, but I'm not sure. I doubt BHP. :p

tellner
May 29, 2006, 02:51 PM
Kaylee, did any of the scenes in the book include Short Arm inspection :p

Kaylee
May 29, 2006, 04:56 PM
Kaylee, did any of the scenes in the book include Short Arm inspection

*Heh* Yeah, as I recall a lot of the characters were well under four feet high.. brings a whole new meaning to "short arms" I guess. It's been years (decades?) since I read it -- I just found the book cleaning out my parents' old house this week. Though now that I look again, it doesn't really look like there's room for the carrier to cycle in that thing, does it? Hrm.. I'd remembered the author as being positively OCD over the technical end of things, that ain't like him. Oh well. :p

jerkface11
May 29, 2006, 06:00 PM
I can't believe no one has mentioned this yet.

The Kill-o-zap gun from the Hitchhikes guide series.

As for firearms working in space I wonder if gunpowder would break down in a vacuum?

Grape Ape
May 29, 2006, 06:26 PM
Akokdo Said: also remember, the moon doesn't spin like the earth, the bit that is facing the earth now is facing the earth all the time.

This means that whatever is exposed to the sun has a LONG time to be exposed to the sun, and hence build up to 110c, or whatever it was.

The same face of the Moon always faces the Earth, but the Moon orbits the Earth every 28 days, so the Moon is in effect rotating at a rate of one revolution per orbit. A 28 Earth day rotation does mean that an object on Moon would get ~336 (allowing for local topography) of un-filtered sunlight per lunar "day".

This is totally different than hopping off of a spaceship and have your gun immediately get unbearably hot or cold

I think that the insulation in your suite would make this a non-issue. I'd worry more about the cold making the steel brittle (Kb!) or the heat causing a cook-off. Better bring one of those ceramic Glock 7s :rolleyes:

kahr404life
May 29, 2006, 06:49 PM
Just want to save post for my records

Chrontius
May 29, 2006, 08:10 PM
Aren't we forgetting Schlock Mercenary's BH-209?

And the AP-130, and BH-250?

http://www.SchlockMercenary.com
Mercenary Strip Search (http://www.mercenarystripsearch.com)
Chalain's Science Corner (http://schlockmercenary.com/chalain-vasimir.html)

HankB
May 29, 2006, 08:39 PM
The Dorsai novels of Gordon R. Dickson have "spring guns" which apparently use stored mechanical energy to fire needlelike darts at high velocity. These conceptually simple weapons are in wide use as electronic countermeasures can monkey with higher-tech weapons.

Keith Laumer used needle guns in A Plague of Demons, published around 1964 or 1965. The propellent wasn't mentioned, but these needles could be coated with particularly deadly venoms.

I particularly like the "X-Plosive" bullets used by E.E. Smith's characters in his Skylark novels. Available in various yields from Mark I to Mark X, from the descriptions a Mark I apparently is about as powerful as a pound or two of C4. A Mark V, when fired at a target over 900 yards away, staggers the shooter and obliterates a large part of the target range. Character commented "I don't want to shoot any Mark X's around here."

Even though the science was shakey by today's standards, some of the old-timers like Edmund Hamilton and John W. Campbell had some active imaginations in arming their characters . . . I remember the "ball lighting guns" from Campbell's The Mightiest Machine published in the mid 1930's . . .

And of course there were the energy handguns of A. E. Van Vogt's Weapon Shop novels which would jump to the user's hand when needed . . . an idea which also surfaced in Harry Harrison's Deathworld novels.

dfariswheel
May 29, 2006, 10:10 PM
I forgot about possibly the ultimate pistol.

It's from "The Death World Trilogy" by Harry Harrison.

There's a planet so insanely deadly that animals and plants seem to be genetically engineered specifically to kill humans.

The people who try to survive on the planet wear pistols on their inner forearms.
When the hand is formed to fit a pistol grip and the trigger finger is tensed, the gun is automatically slapped at extremely high speed into the hand.
If you hold your finger just right, the gun fires the instant it deploys, including in full auto.

With practice, when you need the gun, it's in your hand, and when you don't need it it returns to the holster.
The users quickly become so used to the them, that they become entirely instinctive, and the guns seem to deploy themselves.

Randy in Arizona
May 30, 2006, 12:11 AM
Spider Robinson had a throwaway line in one of his novels, about a terrorist using a commercially available disposable gun --
:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D
:p :p Sounds like a Glock to me!! :p :p
:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

G36-UK
May 30, 2006, 01:10 AM
There was a short mention in Peter Telep's Descent: Stealing Thunder, of a gun that made our/your standard of "concealed carry" seem a little tame.

It was an automatic rifle called a "flight-piece". Judging by the small part it has in the novel, it sounds about the size of an M4. The reason for the expense was that it could project a cloaking field around itself, rendering it invisible to all visual and electronic scanning devices, which would probably include X-Ray scanners.

The gun gets a short description in a single paragraph, when the father of the boy that was murdered for a secret control chip walks up to the offices of the murderer's employers, and opens fire, killing security, civilians, and even a child.

Husker1911
May 30, 2006, 01:39 AM
"The people who try to survive on the planet wear pistols on their inner forearms.
When the hand is formed to fit a pistol grip and the trigger finger is tensed, the gun is automatically slapped at extremely high speed into the hand."


You know, I was watching James West just last night! :)

default
May 30, 2006, 02:39 AM
Right now, I'm reading Richard K. Morgan's sequel to "Altered Carbon", "Broken Angels". The protagonist carries twin "Kalashnikov interface guns". It's not clear exactly what they are, but they appear to be some sort of concealable chemical-propellant firearms that are tied in to the character's genetically-engineered enhanced combat body, and somehow are attracted back to the user even if dropped or grabbed, at least at certain distances. Much as I like the author and the book (and Kalashnikovs, for that matter), it seems unlikely that "Kalashnikov" would be a brand name/manufacturer in a 25th-century interstellar civilization, since, strictly speaking, it's a platform, not a brand name/manufacturer such as S&W, Colt, etc. I've seen Norinco "Kalashnikovs", but never a Kalashnikov "MAK-90".:)

Stiletto Null
May 30, 2006, 03:35 AM
Well, Mikhail Kalashnikov IS a person. Maybe there's a company in the future named after him?

Interface guns are just normal guns, with personal coding (smart guns, tied into the interface plates inside a given sleeve's palms) and small antigrav devices to make them fly toward their coded operators when called. Wrong user can't fire them, and they will come back to you if you drop them in, say, water.

IMO, Morgan should have kept going with the stack/sleeve universe. Market Forces just wasn't as badass as Altered Carbon or Broken Angels. Still OK, I guess, for what it was.

default
May 30, 2006, 11:56 AM
Stiletto Null, that's pretty much exactly how I justified it in my own head.:) Did you read "Woken Furies"? I have it on order, hopefully it will arrive before I finish "Broken Angels". Thanks for the explanation on the "interface gun", I'm about halfway through the book, he's used them a couple of times, but they haven't been clearly described yet.

Stiletto Null
May 30, 2006, 12:03 PM
Yeah, I think Morgan was just thin on explaining the interface guns because there wasn't that much to explain. You're thinking too hard. :)

Never heard of Woken Furies, but I'll check it out at some point.

default
May 30, 2006, 12:10 PM
"Woken Furies" is the third and final Kovacs novel, apparently it was released late in 2005. What kind of outlandish but gnarly weapons does this book contain, I wonder? :D

Stiletto Null
May 30, 2006, 12:14 PM
OH SHI-

SWEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEET!

Definitely buying it, then, just on principle. :D

Brian Williams
May 30, 2006, 01:22 PM
In The Diadem series by Jo Clayton, they used a dart/needle gun that had various reserviors that contained sleep drugs, poison, etc. The gun pulled water vapor from the air and froze it into a needle with the drug of choice and then using self contained compressed air shot it out. It recharged it's own battery from surrounding light and kept it's compressed air cylinder recharged internally. The only thing that had to be refreshed was the chemicals for the darts.

juggler
May 30, 2006, 01:34 PM
Funny how this thread came up at a time when I am trying to remember a specific SciFi series of books. Hopefully someone can identify it from this description of the firearm of choice.

The basic premise followed a time-corp/peackeeper force that used a weapon capable of manufacturing it's own ammo……created from raw stock (shavings, pennies, etc.), that was able to change direction in flight.

One of the best parts was it's ability to lock onto a target and the projectile would follow until impact/penetration.

If it's any help, the last book of the trilogy had the hero back in time where one of the protagonists had given the Roman Empire bicycles.

Any ideas?

Carl N. Brown
May 30, 2006, 03:41 PM
I wonder if a cartridge loaded at normal air pressure wouldn't push the bullet or primer out, when exposed to vacuum.

The Soviet Soyuz space capsule includes a survival weapon that is
basicly a double 20 ga. plus a .22 centerfire barrel. The ordinary
lacquer sealant of primer and friction crimp seal of bullet seems to work
exposed to vacuum.

I would suspect that eventually any air left in the cartridge would
eventually leak out rather than push the bullet or primer out.
But this subject is a job for .... MYTHBUSTERS IN SPACE. Can I go?

fixyurgun
May 30, 2006, 03:49 PM
Mr. Brown, Thank you for your answer. jim

Carl N. Brown
May 30, 2006, 04:43 PM
In L. Ron Hubbard's "Battlefield Earth". The heros find some well preserved Thompson submachine guns (and the author makes a point of saying this) WITHOUT a compensator on the muzzle.

Well, those brave earthmen figure out that if they turn the gun sideways that nasty muzzle jump will help them strafe side to side instead of giving them muzzle climb!

SAY WHAT?

Not to defend L. Ron Hubbard, or even Scientology fer that matter, BUT

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=40591&stc=1&d=1149017797

Owen
May 30, 2006, 05:11 PM
The pressure differential is inconsequential. It's only 14.7 psi. Considering the 20k psi in a 9mm, the differential between sea-level pressure and vacuum will be negligible.

Temperature may be an issue. The blackbody temperature of space is only 3 degrees or so above absolute zero. There is an easy solution tho...a little electric heater will warm up your piece right quick. If you don't want it to get hot, just shade it from sunlight.

The temperature buildup from firing will be a problem. Without some sort of gaseous convection, getting rid of heat wil be a problem. Good thing cartridge cases do a pretty good job of that.

Owen
May 30, 2006, 05:18 PM
Carl,

Are you trying to say that a sideways thompson won't have horizontal muzzle climb?

edited: nevermind Carl, one day i'll figure out those darn quote things

Owen
May 30, 2006, 05:21 PM
What about the capacitor guns in "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea?"

Carl N. Brown
May 30, 2006, 05:42 PM
Carl,
Are you trying to say that a sideways thompson won't have horizontal muzzle climb?

I'm saying it won't have vertical jump, that it can be used as in the
the novel for sideways strafing.

Thefabulousfink
May 30, 2006, 05:59 PM
Lots of good Sci-Fi weapons in Semper Mars by Ian Douglas
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0380788284/102-3979893-9530569?v=glance&n=283155

Plot: A Cold War breaks out between the US and the UN. At the same time a small number of US Marines and US scientists are part of a larger UN misson on Mars. Once the conflict breaks out, the US Marines try to take back control of the outpost even though they are out-numbered and out-gunned. This leads me to the best Sci-Fi weapon ever....

The Can Of Beer.:D

One of the Marines had smuggled several cases of beer from Earth. When they were hurled at the UN forces, they ruptured and the low pressure on Mars made the beer in to a rapidly expanding, sticky foam. The UN troops thought that they were being attacked with biological weapons, panicked and were quickly overrun.:D

G36-UK
May 30, 2006, 09:18 PM
One last gun from me. In the UK Comic series 2000AD, there was a set of stories about a man named Nikolai Dante.

During one of his stories, he was given a rifle called the Huntsman 5000. Now this is one "smart gun" you wouldn't refuse!

The Huntsman resembles a musket, with the main difference that it's a semi-automatic rifle. The Ammunition is automatically reloaded and replenished, and is for all intents and purposes, infinite. The ammunition is a special "smart" bullet that can turn itself into the most efficient way of destroying a target (in one sequence, Dante attacks a firing squad to rescue a man, killing a few of them, then his next shot destroys a gunship that was designed to pacify full insurrections).

The smartest part it the Huntsman's security. The gun is locked to a single person's gene-print, although it can be re-coded at the users' command. If an unauthorised person fires this gun, the bullet reverses direction and uses them for target practice.:evil:

Elmer Snerd
May 30, 2006, 11:34 PM
The Black Ray Pistol from the post-apoc RPG Gamma World is nasty. If its beam hit any living thing that was not protected by a forcefield, the lifeform died.

If we expand this discussion to grenades, GW also has some nasty grenades: The Torc Grenade disintegrated anything that did not have a forcefield in its blast radius. The Photon Grenade killed every living thing that did not have a forcefield in its blast radius.

The mercenaries of Fasolini's Company in David Drake's The Forlorn Hope had tapered-bore rifles with barrels of synthetic diamond. They fired saboted osmium needles at ludicrous speeds that could penetrate APC armor. The Company also had a 7mm SP gun that worked on the same principle for antitank missions.

mrmeval
May 31, 2006, 12:28 AM
In Michael Z. Williamson's "The Weapon"
The ultimate weapon is the Operatives. Brutal men and women who can use anything to protect their planet.

A sparesly settled planet that is independant is slowly getting pressured to join the UN formally. The Operatives have been trained and sent by the the Freehold.

The UN has no clue.

mrmeval
May 31, 2006, 12:33 AM
L. Neil Smith had the "Webley Electric" fed from a wire spool, high density power source and what is called a coil gun.

Could do variable rate, variable size and variable power. At it's maxium it's 10,000 rounds per minute.

I remember a gas gun that would shoot a ball of gas that would act like a massive punch when it expanded. Very close combat weapon.

GrammatonCleric
May 31, 2006, 02:14 AM
Hey now, let's not forget Sheva 9, Bun Bun!! From John Ringos Posleen War series, it's a massive anti-lander mobile (just barely) artillery piece equipped to shoot a 16" smoothbore, saboted, depleted uranium penetrator round with an antimatter warhead. The Terran ACS battalions are equipped with grav rifles that fire depleted uranium "teardrops" at relativistic velocities. They also have terawatt lasers, fletchette cannons, and plasma cannons.

HankB
May 31, 2006, 02:47 PM
OK, here are a few more . . . remember Edgar Rice Burroughs? He's most famous for the Tarzan books, but back before WWII he also wrote a series of heroic adventures featuring John Carter of Mars and Carson of Venus. The humanoid Martians mostly hacked at each other with swords, but they did use "radium pistols" on occasion. The green martians had rifles which could be fired with deadly accuracy for 200 miles in Mars' thin air.

ERB's Venusians had "R-Ray" pistols which simply disintegrated living tissue, and "T-Ray" guns which disintegrated all matter. (OK, ok, the science is more than just fuzzy by today's standard, but the storytelling aspect was better than a lot of the drakh being published today.)

The original Buck Rogers novel had the American insurgents using rocket pistols with explosive bullets that had the force of artillery shells, whereas the evil Asian invaders used "Dis" rays that dissolved all matter into nothingness.

One of Larry Niven's novels had an tnuctipun (sp?) handweapon which would morph into any of a number of shapes . . . one of which would apparently cause a nuclear chain reaction in any substance it hit. Shooting a planet with it wasn't a good idea, at least, not if you were on the planet yourself.

(Though not a gun, I liked Niven's "Variable Sword" . . . a molecule-thin entendable wire, encased in a stasis field, which would cut through virtually anything.)

Carl N. Brown
June 19, 2006, 02:24 PM
In Alfred Bester's The Demolished Man a guy who decides
to commit a murder in a future policed by telepaths used
an antique pistol, I believe it was one of those Parisian
Apache foldup combo pepperbox, knucks and dagger.
If I remeber correctly, he used some kind of gelatin bullet.

zoom6zoom
June 19, 2006, 02:45 PM
The UN has no clue.

That part's not fiction.

zoom6zoom
July 8, 2006, 10:45 PM
Found a really good link to add to this discussion - Sidearms of Sci-Fi. Lots of great pictures. Just happened across it while googling for links on a Whitney Wolverine...

http://www.projectrho.com/rocket/rocket3l.html

The other pages on the site are great for sci-fi nuts also.

richyoung
July 9, 2006, 03:52 AM
my favs are actual guns - Heinlirn mentioned a match 1903 Springfield, and another author had the protagonist carrying a Dardick tround automatic revolver. Coupl;e of authors mentioned the Gyro-Jet. Favorite ficyional gun was a firearm that shot coils of wire at high velocity - they quickly became non-lethal, and wouldn't shoot through walls, but delivered nasty wounds close up.

Gifted
July 9, 2006, 04:19 AM
A few:
David Drake has a series about an armored mercenary company-Hammer's Slammers-they used a special copper plate that basically stored an ion charge. When activated, POP!, instant particle beam. They had them from handguns to the 20cm main guns on the hover tanks.

Piper apparently figured the 10mm would be a logical firearm for the future, most of his guns were fairly normal by our standards. He and many others wrote before rays and beams and stuff became popular. I'm personally thinking that for unaugmented(read-without power armor or a tank)troops, it'll be a while before guns as we know them become obsolete.

Needle guns are pretty generic. Everything from flechette rounds to coil gun types, I've read at least half a dozen authors that used them in one form or another.

There's the bead guns from the Weber/Ringo March to the Sea and that series. Essentially coil guns, but very nice.

Foriegn Legions By David Drake had long bows.:D Much fun.

Cyantians make use of subspace, using it to store stuff for instant retrieval. Mostly their armor:
http://www.cyantian.net/csafari/archive.php?day=20001013

Among thoughts I've had, are race at peace for so long, they're still using something along the lines of a blackpowder .45-70 for an infantry weapon when boarding another starship. You don't really have to have a technological reason to go to swords and hand-to-hand, if your materials technology keeps up to date with your projectile technology, than guns would never really catch on as anything more than support, much like the bows they replaced. Give enough peace that tactics don't absorb nuclear weapons and such, and you have a nice place to have a war when modern humans break on the scene.

shaldag
July 9, 2006, 07:23 AM
You like guns? Try Snow Crash, by Neal Stephenson.

I don't want to ruin things for anyone, but everyone should listen to REASON.

geim druth
July 9, 2006, 09:52 AM
In 'Emil and the Dutchman' by Joel Rosenberg just about everyone uses wireguns that hold 200 silcohalcoid projectiles. The Dutchman prefers the stopping power of his Colt & Wesson .44 Magnum revolver loaded with Glaser Safety Slugs.

Piper's stuff is great. The Paratime Police carry sigma-ray needlers, neurostat guns, and neutron-disruption blasters, but when Vall hunts the nighthound in Pennsylvania he uses a Sharp's Model '37, 235 Ultraspeed-Express. He actually kills it with a Smith & Wesson .357 Magnum. Kalvan carries a Colt .38 Special. The Zarthani use flintlocks but with a back-acting lock, the flint held tightly against a moving striker.

statelineblues
July 9, 2006, 10:02 AM
Love H. Beam Piper - he was one on the first to try to be accurate in depicting weapons, although I did cringe when he talked about a post-apocalyptic military unit with "M14 rifles and M16 submachine guns". "Junkyard Planet" was my favorite.

priv8ter
July 9, 2006, 10:55 AM
Heinlein was big on Skoda brand firearms and dart pistols. In number of the Beast, there is a Skoda pistol small enough to fit in a secret pocket of a purse that holds 24 poison darts.

In The Cat Who Walks through Walls, there is a Dart gun that shoots explosive darts vice poison darts.

One of my favorite scenes involving Heinlein and firearms is near the begining of Glory Road, when Oscar is trying to decide between a Thompson and National Match Springfield('It even had the star on the barrel') before being told that firearms don't work on that world.

Stepping the 'Way Back Machine' I always kind of dug the micro Machine Pistols that Doc Savage and his gang used.

greg

Tommygunn
July 9, 2006, 07:06 PM
What about the original:

1911_CQB
July 9, 2006, 09:09 PM
Bolt pistol, and Bolter guns( kinda like carbines) form the Marhammer 40,000 wolrd (WH40K)

The standard weapon of the Space Marines is the boltgun, also known as a bolter. A bolter is a heavy gun that fires rocket-propelled rounds with mass-reactive explosive payloads. Bolters are made in both pistol and rifle form, as well as the machine gun-like heavy bolter.

Standard Bolts; are comprised of the following components: Outer casing, propellant base, main charge, mass reactive detonator cap, depleted deuterium core, diamantine tip. Spin stabilised at .75 calibre.

evan price
July 9, 2006, 10:12 PM
Check out Brian Daley's series, The Adventures Of Hobart Floyt & Alacrity Fitzhugh. It's a trilogy, First is: Requiem for a Ruler of Worlds, then: Jinx on a Terran Inheiritance, last is: Fall of the White Ship Avatar. Lots of different weapons used there. I give it an A+ for a good piece of mind cocaine to be read when needed.

Alacrity Fitzhugh carries The Captain's Sidearm, an energy weapon custom designed to be carried by the Captain of the White Ship, which was tuned to produce maximum muzzle blast/noise when fired to discourage mutineers. Also, it produces a handy short-bladed sword for hand-to-hand fighting. Unfortunately the charge indicator seems to malfunction frequently, showing full charge when the magazine is empty, or empty when not empty. Fitzhugh also carries a very Tacticool umbrella.

Good old Hobart Floyt of Earthservice wound up with a reproduction of a .455 Webley top-break revolver loaded with "Chicago Popcorn", described as "dum-dum bullets with the casings notched back to the cartridge". He also learned to shoot the classic way, one eye squinted shut, tongue sticking out side of mouth. Or, sometimes, TWO eyes squinted shut.

There are also Actijots, a micro-dot implant that is inflicted upon unfortunate victims which allows them to be tracked anywhere upon a planet equipped with a Talos Worldshield central control system, the jots are also capable of inflicting pain varying from excruciating and disabling to fatal with the push of a button either on a remote-control device or an entry of serial number into the worldshield computer. Actijots are "Small enough to lose in a pore" and horrible tales are told about unfortunate jot-slaves who tracked aches or pains for months before deciding to perform self surgery to try to remove the jot.


Brian Daley is also the guy who wrote the "Han Solo" standalone novels. Also good reads.


+1 on E. E. "Doc" Smith's books. Lensman books were actually mentioned in Heinlien's "Number of the Beast" as an alternate universe. Talk about a serious no nonsense LEO! We need more Kimball Kinnisons today.

+1 on David Drake's "Hammers Slammers" although the powerguns used a polymerized caseless ammo that was the source of the ion particles.
Hammer's aide de camp, Joachim Steuben, was demonically accurate with a 10mm powergun pistol.
Could you imagine Colonel Alois Hammer leading his regiment into Iraq? >shiver<

+1 on anything Heinliens' ever written

statelineblues
July 11, 2006, 10:50 PM
Sometimes its the weapon - other times its the ammo. I can't remember the book, but I do remember a scene where a kid is carrying a semi-auto hunting rifle with a barrel sawed off to about 10". When he fires at a group of soldiers he asks, "Did I get them all?" Seems the bullets had micro processers in them that locked onto a single target. A similar idea popped up later in a Tom Selleck Sci-fi movie.

NukemJim
July 12, 2006, 01:33 AM
I can't remember the book, but I do remember a scene where a kid is carrying a semi-auto hunting rifle with a barrel sawed off to about 10". When he fires at a group of soldiers he asks, "Did I get them all?" Seems the bullets had micro processers in them that locked onto a single target. A similar idea popped up later in a Tom Selleck Sci-fi movie.

I believe it was Vernor Vinge in "The peace war"

NukemJim

Vairochana
July 12, 2006, 02:15 AM
E.E. "Doc" Smith-circa 1923- .45 automatics loaded with explosive copper projectiles-everything from anti personel to one that can level a mountain

mrmeval
July 12, 2006, 02:56 AM
That is probably the Peace War. A device that can create 'bobbles' is made by a 'tinker'. The established powers send a team to surveil a group and the kid sprays and doesn't have to pray. The bullets each target one of the group, seeking them by radar/heat and coordinating amongst themselves. The bobble device seals of a volume of space and stops time within it. It's later used as a sheilding device.

The sequel Marooned in Realtime deals with the people sealed in long term bobbles coming back to .... an empty earth....

Vernor Vinge can write...haunting stuff. A Fire Upon The Deep is excellent, the parallel dog mind creatures are the perfect childhood friend.

In the same universe but not a follow up is "A Deepness In The Sky" it's hard to describe but in general how do you break your enslavement from people who can turn you into a 'focused' savant which can be anything from a menial, artist, automation, or sex toy. :what:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0765308835/103-5400036-2933413?v=glance&n=283155


statelineblues
Sometimes its the weapon - other times its the ammo. I can't remember the book, but I do remember a scene where a kid is carrying a semi-auto hunting rifle with a barrel sawed off to about 10". When he fires at a group of soldiers he asks, "Did I get them all?"

statelineblues
July 12, 2006, 03:23 AM
Thanks NukemJim and mrmeval! Dead on the money with "The Peace War". I must have read that book 15 - 20 years ago. Didn't know there was a sequel; I'll have to get it. I always wondered what happened to the guy that got half his fingers caught on the other side of the bubble.....

AJ Dual
July 12, 2006, 12:57 PM
statelineblues, the "Realtime" series is one of the best I have ever read. I suggess you Amazon Vinge's works and find them.

___POTENTIAL MINOR SPOLERS______

There's a short novella about the "Ungoverned Lands" which is sort of a peaceful and high-tech "L. Neil Smith Libertarian/Anarchist vision of North America" that comes after the tinkerers defeat the Peace Authority in "The Peace War". There's another "war" brewing when the more traditionaly governed nation-state of the New Mexico Republic makes a move on the Libertarian "Ungoverned Lands" of Kansas and Nebraska on a trumped-up basis.

The farmers of Kansas have contracted with a security corporation that calls itself the "Michigan State Police" taking the name of the pre-Peace War institution. And they send one "cop" to stop the New Mexican Army. Fortunately some of the wealthier and more paranoid farmers are very, very, very, well armed. LOL. He was sent more as a negotiator, as the New Mexicans are unprepared for what they're getting into...

The third part of the series, "Marroned in Realtime" deals with the aftermath of "The Singularity", the point when Humanity's technology self-reinforced at an exponential rate to reach a runaway point, and humanity either evolved into abstraction from the viewpoint of normal humans, or went extinct, whatever happened dosen't really matter, as we're not smart enough to find out.

Since the time of the Peace War, various people had been "bobbled", (think like a Larry Niven'esque stasis field) for crimes, by being attacked, or to save them selves from emergencies like crashing spaceships, or even just as an easy way to travel into the future. These people are at various states of increasingly high technology depending on how close to the singularity they got bobbled.

After popping out into an abandoned and empty earth after the singularity took place, they band together to use thier bobbles to travel forward in time and collect other bobbled survivors. Some characters from the previous books come together after being bobbled, several millions of years in the future.

The higher-tech people are very, very, high tech. They have robots, nanotech that can make anything they want, AI that can design it for them, and thier "mansions" convert into spaceships that are capable of everything from near lightspeed interstellar travel to living at the bottom of the ocean. They don't really carry weapons, as they have unobtrusive robot bodygaurds following them everywhere, able to unleash God-knows-what if trouble were to start.

Then there is a "murder". When the village "bobbles up" to freeze themselves to make a jump a few hundred years into the future to collect some other survivors that are about to un-bobble, one of the leaders is marooned by being left outside, to die a natural death surviving on her own on an Earth where evolution has changed plants and animals, and even the continents have shifted...

Very cool stuff.

Vinge's "Fire Apon the Deep", and "A Deepness In The sky" are separate, and placed in the ramscoop trader galaxy of the "Queng Ho" , but they too are some of te best SF I've ever read.

Ego Archive
July 12, 2006, 05:19 PM
With all the mention of Heinlein, I'm surprised that the shoulder mounted tactical warhead launcher (I think the Maurader suits were mentioned) weren't mentioned.

Also Simon Green's Deathstalker books have Disruptors that I absolutely hated until I figured out why he had written them the way he did. Also it had the "Darkvoid Device" which had been used to destroy a thousand suns.

James Alan Gardner's Expendable (and subsequent series of books) had sonic disruptors, because anyone who willfully killed another sentient would not be allowed space travel (far advanced alien races destroy muderers upon leaving orbit).

Zero_DgZ
July 12, 2006, 05:28 PM
How could we possibly forget the still-in-beta Reason from Neal Stephenson's "Snow Crash?" The Deliverator also had some sort of funky little self-defense railgun that recharged via the cigarette lighter socket of his car. It was never named, but it sounded cool.

And Raven had that H-Bomb warhead wired up in the sidecar of his bike...

Lucky
August 17, 2006, 03:37 AM
Thanks for both! Atomic rocket was the one I remembered.

madmike
April 12, 2008, 04:29 PM
Various comments:

Larry Niven had dart guns with anesthetic for organleggers, and stunners for dueling.

Heinlein's Beyond This Horizon had duels. Most people use "clean" energy type weapons. The main character uses a .45.

Hyunchback: Your Moon physics are inaccurate. The weapon will heat/cool depending on exposure to sunlight/open space. An enclosed holster will protect it. No atmospheric O2 is needed for propellant.

Devonai: sounds interesting, but you're running up against atmospheric friction at that muzzle velocity--accuracy crap, velocity rapidly dropping to current velocities.

The concept of the guy shooting himself in the back also assumes a great circle and no coriolis effect. It's LOW on the Moon, but it is not NONEXISTENT.

Dean Ing's "Chiller" in 7mm was awesome. Integrally silenced, CO2 cooled, CO2 breaks the mechanism, traps the finger of an unauthorized shooter.

Dune didn't have shields defeated by nukes, but by wind-driven dust.

Drake's powerguns are effectively plasma rockets--energy turning a copper disc into a light-speed blast. The problem with the physics is that the recoil would launch things into orbit. However, they are about the coolest thing out there.

No one has mentioned:

Phased plasma rifle in 40 watt range

and the pulse rifle from Aliens

ALL of Bond's movie weaponry was cool (Except the crap in Moonraker).

Tim Zahn had the "Cordon Sanitaire" story. Small projectiles, toxic to most life forms, in durable guns left lying around. Settle the planet, and anyone holding it (including apelike things) gets a chemically induced urge to shoot you. Makes settling difficult.

Niven had the gyrojet in one of his stories.

Thanks for the mention of mine. I suspect we'll still be using rifles in 500 years. We were using them 500 years ago...

I suspect we'll be using knives in 500 years. We were using them half a million years ago...

Avenger
April 12, 2008, 05:07 PM
Sorry, but the BEST weapon in Sci-fi history wasn't a projectile thrower, or even a laser. In "Starship Troopers", Robert Heinlein introduced the thirty second talking bomb. You toss it, and in mid-air it starts squawking, "I'm a 30 second talking bomb! 29, 28, 27..." Just imagine the psychological ramifications of dropping one of those into a crowded bunker.....:what::eek: Gives me the cold-spined heebie-jeebies just thinking of it.

Sage of Seattle
April 12, 2008, 05:16 PM
Sorry for not reading all of this thread, just had to respond:

The big question: How do you send a soldier home to civilian life with enough non-removable weapons to out-gun a company and a computer implanted in his brain that can open fire on it's own if IT feels threatened.

How do you? Very politely?


William C. Dietz had throwaway Glocks in "Bodyguard."

Throwaway Glocks? Whatever else would you do with them? :neener:

madmike
April 12, 2008, 06:43 PM
The Thirty Second Bomb was one of the best, but not as creepy as Bomb Number 19 in Darkstar.

Avenger
April 13, 2008, 03:11 PM
Throwaway Glocks? Whatever else would you do with them?

It wouldn't surprise me to learn that Glocks are recyclable.

Sage of Seattle
April 13, 2008, 03:32 PM
It wouldn't surprise me to learn that Glocks are recyclable.

Heh. You know I'm just kidding around with my Glock-loving buddies. I mean, there's a lot of good that's come from the Glock line. Like a Springer XD for example...






KIDDING!

Devonai
April 13, 2008, 04:02 PM
Devonai: sounds interesting, but you're running up against atmospheric friction at that muzzle velocity--accuracy crap, velocity rapidly dropping to current velocities.

Thanks for the feedback. I will consider the limitations that may exist within my own parameters for the technology.

madmike
April 13, 2008, 04:03 PM
Lefties should LOVE GLOCKs. Being recyclable, they're green technology, environmentally sound, and using less metal reduces their carbon footprint.

madmike
April 13, 2008, 04:10 PM
Devonai: I have the numbers around here somewhere, but in Earth's atmosphere (or any similarly dense), once you hit about 4000 FPS, velocity drops off FAST. Within 100 yards, it's down to 3000 anyway. So you don't gain significant range, do use a lot more propellant, and potentially disrupt the projectile with friction if it's not FMJ.

Above that velocity, all kinds of weird #@$ starts to happen. You're reaching a velocity to density curve that starts to create massive oscillations right out of the muzzle. Then the velocity drops even faster.

Base bleed can improve this a little, but also affects accuracy.

You should hear me take apart proponents of laser weapons at panels, playing Devil's Advocate (For the General Staff). : "So, for an investment of $6 billion R&D I can get a man-portable weapon that will kill an enemy soldier at up to 2000 meters...when 98% of engagements are under 300 meters, and I ALREADY have a weapon that will do that at $600/unit. No thanks.";-)

John and I cheated for The Hero and used gravity-shot beads with on board stabilization and force fields to maintain velocity/stability. Now, if we can just figure out how to DO THAT...

Jubjub
April 13, 2008, 04:13 PM
I liked the MP-35 Infantry Rifle from John Scalzi's Old Man's War.

"it can create and fore on the fly six different projectiles or beams. These include rifle bullets and shot of both explosive and nonexplosive varieties, which can be fired semiautomatically or automatically, low-yield grenades, low-yield guided rockets, high-pressure flammable liquid, and microwave energy beams. This is possible throught the use of high-density nano-robotic ammunition"

My favorite weapon in a game was in an old shooter called MDK, though it wasn't a gun. It was called The World's Most Interesting Bomb. When you threw it in the vicinity of the enemy, they would come out from cover and gather around it, jabbering and waving for others to come over. After all the enemy in the area were gathered around it, the predictable thing occured.

NMshooter
April 13, 2008, 06:11 PM
I recall a muzzle velocity of 6500 fps for US 120mm sabot ammo...

At some point you might want a heat shield to prevent atmospheric degradation of a truly high speed projectile.

Projectile weapons will be around for a very long time indeed.

I still want a few of Drake's power guns, though.

Funderb
April 13, 2008, 06:22 PM
Anybody have any idea what gun Professor used in Heinlein's The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress?

They were a type of laser hand drill turned way up on intensity, that made them into hand lasers!

madmike
April 13, 2008, 07:06 PM
No, de la Paz had a pistol. The laser weapons were cabled mining lasers with "hand-held" collimators, about the size of jackhammers.

Mike OTDP
April 13, 2008, 08:34 PM
Let's see what nobody has mentioned....

In "First Lensman", Doc Smith had the protagonists switch guns...from Lewiston blasters to pistols. The reason being that pistols were more precise - and they were working to foil an murder attempt at a state function.

But I'm shocked that nobody has mentioned the Gun from the book version of "Logan's Run". A revolver...shooting multi-purpose rounds. Needler (knockout), Tangler (net launcher), Ripper (armor piercing), Vapor (tear gas), Nitro (high explosive), and Homer (heat-seeking...the killing round).

dfariswheel
April 13, 2008, 09:25 PM
Already mentioned, the self-drawing pistols from "The Deathworld Trilogy"

The gun is worn in a "holster" attached to the forearm.
When you form your hand into a grip, the gun senses it and shoves the gun into your hand on the end of a cable.
If you hold your trigger finger in the right position, the gun fires the instant it hits your hand.
With training, the draw is instinctive. Sense trouble and the gun is in your hand before you know you need it.
The gun is also capable of full-auto.

From the series "The Man Who Never Missed", also mentioned, the hero sets out to bring down an interstellar empire.
His weapon: "Spetsdods.
These are dart guns that are glued to the back of the hand.
When you point at a target, the end of your finger is near a tube projecting out of the device.
It senses your finger and fires a dart.
The darts contain toxins that can cause death, short-term paralysis, or LONG-Term paralysis.

In the "Honor Harrington" series, Harrington looses her arm in battle. Her "paranoid" father not only builds her a new mechanical arm, this one contains a gun. In an emergency, it simply shoots her fore finger off.

In an unfinished series by David Gerrold, the soldiers are armed with assault rifles that fire needles at high velocity.
The user wears a helmet with a built-in sight that cycles through various enhancing sights that prevent the enemy from camouflaging himself.

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