S&W 15 ammo


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Broadbill
May 29, 2006, 09:19 PM
I'm a new shooter and was wondering, can a S&W model 15 handle +Ps?

Thanks

BB

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bakert
May 29, 2006, 09:40 PM
Yep. Your model 15 can handle them just fine.

Starter52
May 29, 2006, 10:37 PM
No problem at all. The K-frame is plenty strong enough.

Old Fuff
May 30, 2006, 02:41 AM
No problem at all. The K-frame is plenty strong enough.

Probably it is, but there is a whole lot more to the story...

First of all not all model 15's are equal. The revolver was introduced in 1949 and discontinued in 1999. During that time it went through a number of engineering changes, some of which effected longevity.

And while the frame is not likely to show serious wear, the yoke (that part that holds the cylinder to the frame when you swing the cylinder out) has a barrel on which the cylinder revolves. It is in effect a thin wall tube, and the sharper recoil of SOME Plus-P ammunition can result in the cylinder battering the end of the yoke barrel until a condition called "end shake" developes. Then the cylinder moves back and forth, and that isn't good.

Moderate use of MOST Plus-P ammunition won't cause any problems, but a stedy diet of some brands can accelerate wear. For shooting at a range or plinking in the field it is advisable to use standard level ammunition (for which the gun was designed). If you carry or use it as a weapon by all means load it with the hot stuff.

If shooting a lot of high-end loads is important to you consider getting a .357 Magnum, such as a model 19 or something in the 586/686 series.

Jim March
May 30, 2006, 04:30 AM
There's "+P" and then there's "OH MY GAWD PLUS PEEEEEEE"! :D

The mildest "+P" will be the 158gr LSWC-HP (pure lead hollowpoints, no jacket) as made by Federal, Winchester or Remington. They are effective in that order and a lot of people seek out the Remmies. Two even more potent loadings exist involving 158gr lead hollowpoints - you'll find old-stock Cor-Bon and the new Buffalo Bore variant. Those are both pretty wild, but your gun can digest a healthy diet of the Remmies or Winchesters.

We know that in 357Magnum, the lighter 125gr jacketed rounds are actually nastier on the gun than the heavyweights like the 158s, even when the power level is the same and both are jacketed. That's because the lighter round accellerates faster and hits the forward edge of the cylinder and back of the barrel harder than the heavies.

There's reason to think the same will carry over to 38spl, esp. since the plain lead rounds work well in that caliber as they're not driven fast enough to fly apart like they would in 357.

If you're of the opinion that you should do a lot of practice with your carry load, and I personally question that view but it IS popular and has some merit, then I think the Remmie 158+P lead hollowpoint is the way to go in that gun.

If you do NOT hold to that view, if you think (as I do) that your own body's changes under stress will overwhelm any difference in felt recoil and that you might as well get the gun handling down pat with lesser (cheaper) practice loads, then use pretty much anything you want for carry and a small portion of your practice (a cylinderful at the end of your shooting sessions). The newer Gold Dot 135gr +P is a damn fine round or go whole hog with those Buffalo Bores or the Cor-Bon 110gr or 125gr +Ps, all of which are pretty crazy.

Broadbill
May 30, 2006, 09:49 AM
Thanks for the replies.
I'm planning on shooting standard specials but would like to have some +Ps on hand.
The thorough answers and recomendations will help greatly.

BB

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