Corbon .45 Colt 225-gr. DPX Results w/4" Mountain Gun...


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Stephen A. Camp
June 1, 2006, 07:49 PM
Hello. I got the opportunity to try one of the newest versions of ammunition for this fine old revolver round.

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y171/hipowersandhandguns/Corbon45ColtDPXboxMGammo1.jpg
The only revolver I have that is chambered for .45 Colt is this S&W Mountain Gun and it was used for my informal tests.

In a nutshell, this stuff expanded very consistently and penetrated well in super-saturated newsprint.

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y171/hipowersandhandguns/Ammunition/Corbon45ColtDPXvsJHPexpwp1.jpg
The DPX's average penetration depth in the "wetpack" was 8". Mike Shovel at Corbon advises that in the gold standard of expansion media (10% ballistic gelatin), that this bullet penetrated roughly 15" after punching through 4 layers of denim. On the left is the DPX. On the right is Corbon's 200-gr. JHP +P, which uses a Sierra hollow point.

The DPX lost virtually no weight in the newsprint and expansion was most consistent. The average expansion characteristics shook out at 0.879 x 0.867 x 0.614" tall.

Accuracy at both 15 and 25 yards was more than acceptable; in fact, it was quite accurate and capable of better grouping than I am shooting from a rest.

For those interested in a more detailed report and a look at Corbon's conventional 200-gr. JHP +P in this caliber and how it compares to the DPX, here's a link:

http://www.hipowersandhandguns.com/Corbon%2045%20Colt%20DPX%20Test.htm

Best.

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Jim March
June 1, 2006, 09:45 PM
Oh my. Yeah. That works.

Lookit the size of that cavity. It's got "clog resistence" written all over it :). You could throw half the contents of my motorhome's septic tank down that sucker and it would barely notice :evil:.

The shot-to-shot speed consistency means that Cor-Bon brewed up a nice recipe to go with the round. Sweet. I hope Cor-Bon extends that care further as that's one area they're not well known for...they're more "ragged edge of sanity" types which is OK but...can be improved on sometimes.

Gordon
June 1, 2006, 09:57 PM
All righty, I'll keep my 4" 25-3 stoked with it, thanks Mr. C !:)

ssteven1
June 2, 2006, 12:22 AM
Would you consider this ammo safe for use in the S&W mountian guns, or are these ruger only loads.

Stephen A. Camp
June 2, 2006, 12:44 AM
Hello. I have not shot it extensively in anything. The test shooting for this thread was done with my own Mountain Gun and it has shown no ill-effects. Velocity averaged 1120 ft/sec. I spoke with Mr. Mike Shovel at Corbon and he advised that it was safe to use with the S&W...so I did.

As expensive as this ammunition is, I won't be shooting that much of it as well as for reasons discussed in the more detailed article linked to my post here. That said, I plan to try for a whitetail a close range with it this coming deer season.

So I guess the answer to your concern is that I do not know with absolute certainty, but I don't think that the use of Corbon's DPX in this caliber will harm the S&W Mountain Gun...or I wouldn't have fired it in mine, not a single round. As is the case with any caliber or handgun, the use of hotter rounds will probably accelerate wear, but I don't think this ammunition would cause any catastrophic frame, forcing cone, or cylinder failures.

Best.

Jim March
June 2, 2006, 01:16 AM
S&W 45LC DAs varied in terms of their strength. Newer ones are heat-treated to the same standard as their 44Mag in the same frame size and are not THAT far shy of a Ruger. These rounds won't hurt those a bit.

Earlier specimens of S&W and the various Colt SAA-sized 45LCs can *probably* handle moderate amounts of this stuff but it's about as wild as you'd want to go. The gun better be good quality and in good shape...low-grade Italians, be careful, breaktops NO WAY. This is right on the edge. The toughest SAA-class guns like the USFAs and Ruger New Vaq can probably take more than most (slightly oversize cylinders for safety).

Understand, this is my opinion based on "book learnin'" versus experience and represents what I'd shoot in my guns. I'm not experienced enough with S&Ws to know exactly where the cutoff was between newer-era near-44 strength and older.

Master Blaster
June 2, 2006, 10:13 AM
I would be curious to know if after you fire 5 rounds from a cylinder full, if the 6th round jumps the crimp if one opens the cylinder and inspects it.

Could or did you check this when you fired this load??

Thanks

Stephen A. Camp
June 2, 2006, 01:35 PM
Hello. I did that twice with both the 200 grain JHP and the DPX. No jumping of crimps.

Best.

jmcc11
June 2, 2006, 04:26 PM
Thank you Mr. Camp for another great ammo review. I have a question concerning recoil of this load. I understand that felt recoil is very subjective but I was wondering how you would compare the recoil of this load in the Mountain Gun to an airweight J-frame with the 135 grain +p Gold Dot or 158 grain LSWCHP +p ?

Stainz
June 3, 2006, 06:44 PM
I have shot several hundred of the GA Arms 200gr Gold Dots - and the CCI Blazer variants - in .45 Colt, both rated at 1100 fps and supposedly fine for the 625MG. The recoil, with either Ahrends square conversion fg cocobolo stocks or S&W square conversion wood stocks, SKU #21991, is no worse than my usual 255gr LSWC/5.7-6.1 gr Titegroup (800-850 fps) plinker load - quite comfortable. Actually, I have chrono-ed the GA Arms version, which comes in nice new Starline brass - actually headstamped for GA Arms. I have chrono-ed them at 1123 fps SD +/-8 fps from my original, purchased new, '01 625MG; 1210 +/- 20 fps from my 5.5" SS Redhawk; and 1424 +/- 6 fps from my 24" SS Puma M1892.

They are heftier walled looking GDJHP's than the lower speed 200gr .44 Special GD (Speer #4427) they both use in their .44 Special ammo, still, older technology, I assume, than those DPX's. I wonder what the pressure is... any idea from Corbon? I assume that the Achille's heel of the 625 is still the cylinder wall thickness at the cylinder stop notch, since the lockwork is essentially the same as a 629. I am fortunate, indeed... a fellow with a LN 625MG, '96 vintage with non-MIM and hammer-mounted fp, traded even for my 5.5" SS .45 Colt Bisley BH, which I hadn't shot much in several years. So, I now have two... what everyone needs!

Stainz

Stephen A. Camp
June 4, 2006, 12:35 AM
Hello, jmcc11. I apologize for the late reply. My ISP has been down for a few days.

To me, the felt recoil is quite similar in both guns. Not "bad" but noticeable.


Best.

seeker_two
June 6, 2006, 01:51 PM
Excellent work as always, Mr. Camp.... :cool:

Would you recommend either the .44SPL or the .45LC loads for the Taurus or Charter Arms snubbies, or would they be too rough to the gun & shooter? :scrutiny:

Many thanks in advance.....

Stephen A. Camp
June 6, 2006, 01:58 PM
Hello. I used the Taurus Model 431 as the test gun for the .44 Spec DPX and FWIW, that's what it is loaded with as this is typed. I have no personal experience with the newer Charters so I honestly don't feel that I can comment on how well they might...or might not handle the DPX load. You might go to Corbon's site (www.corbon.com) and ask their opinion on this.

Best.

saltydog452
June 6, 2006, 03:05 PM
not only for this post, but for the several others that you have posted. You go to lots of trouble, (and expense), to test these various rounds. I appreciate the sharing of your impressions.

salty.

SDGlock23
June 6, 2006, 04:02 PM
Stephen, having owned a S&W Mtn Gun 625-9 for about 6 months, I'm really glad to read your article. I'm quite familiar with the Corbon 200 +P, but I've kept my eye on thier DPX offering. Nice write up, I"ll have to pick up a box!

Those 200gr bullets look to do pretty well out of a 4" tube, out of my 7.5" Ruger, I've always witnessed jacket core seperations, and as you said, it's a pretty aggressive bullet.

Cayoot
June 6, 2006, 07:21 PM
Jim, you wrote:
S&W 45LC DAs varied in terms of their strength. Newer ones are heat-treated to the same standard as their 44Mag in the same frame size and are not THAT far shy of a Ruger. These rounds won't hurt those a bit.

Earlier specimens of S&W and the various Colt SAA-sized 45LCs can *probably* handle moderate amounts of this stuff but it's about as wild as you'd want to go. The gun better be good quality and in good shape...low-grade Italians, be careful, breaktops NO WAY. This is right on the edge. The toughest SAA-class guns like the USFAs and Ruger New Vaq can probably take more than most (slightly oversize cylinders for safety).

Understand, this is my opinion based on "book learnin'" versus experience and represents what I'd shoot in my guns. I'm not experienced enough with S&Ws to know exactly where the cutoff was between newer-era near-44 strength and older.


Could you please clue me into the model (and dash) number where S&W started the heat treatment? Or perhaps the serial number series?

I purchased a wonderful 625 (.45 Colt) Mnt Gun on line a couple of years ago and it has become my favorite shooter. I'm really hoping that it is hardened also.

Thanks

Jim March
June 6, 2006, 08:19 PM
Cayoot, sorry but I don't know the exact cutoff!

My vague memory on this says that anything labeled "Mountain Gun" is in the later series but I'm just not sure. I would suggest going to the S&W specific forums and either searching or asking on it.

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