Enfield Revolver support


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FotoTomas
June 15, 2006, 11:39 AM
I have another Enfield revolver on the way and plan to try and campaign it at some local IDPA matches. I like the old WWII martial Arms and this will be fun. I got a Enfield rifle on the way as well for some three gun fun!

Here is the question...

What speed loaders will work for the English .380 revolver/US .38 S&W round in the Enfield No 2 MK I** revolver? I am planning this to be a fun gun to shoot but not to compete for wins. Even so I prefer not to single load the loose rounds.

I am planning to gather up some old ammo and my selection of speedloaders on hand for show and tell but would appreciate any info some with experience might have.

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FotoTomas
June 18, 2006, 11:34 AM
For those that might want to know...

My HKS speedloaders for the S&W K frame (marked 10) or the loaders for the Colt D frame (marked DS) work very well with the Enfield. The short rounds seem to fit well and the lockup is excellent. No rattle of the rounds in the speedloader. The shortness of the 146 Grain Lead RN factory ammo is not a problem.

The reloading technique is simple as well. Push down on the release lever with the thumb, grab barrel and pull down. The brass will eject as I go for the speed loader, dump the rounds, grab the grip and seat the barrel/cylinder group. Ready to rock and roll. Of course the .38 S&W is not well known as a manstopper so I doubt I will carry this revolver very often! :)

Thefabulousfink
June 21, 2006, 02:39 PM
I have a Webley Mk. IV which is basicly the same gun but with different grips and a hammer. I don't have a speed loader for it, but I considered getting one so I test fitted some .38s&w rounds in an HKS loader for my J-frame. The rounds barely stick out past the wall of the speed loader, so you will want to practice lining them up with the cyclinder.

The hardest thing about shooting the .38s&w is finding good ammo. I usually buy boxes of factory reloads at gunshows for $10-$11 a box. Use solid lead rounds as most .38 bullets these days are undersized (.346-.354) good bullets will be larger (.357-.361), the soft lead will expand to grip the rifling and give you better performance. Every few reloads be sure and check your barrel for lead fouling, not a major problem, but not one to ignore if you like your gun (and hand) in one piece.

The plus side of shooting the .38s&w it the lack of recoil. It is a very easy gun to shoot, and I can fire off rapid strings and easily keep everything in the center of a silhouette target at 25'

Edit: I have carried my Webley a few times, mexican style in the small of my back (I don't a ccw holster for it). It may not be a .45acp, but the 5" barrel really helps get rounds on target and I wouldn't want to get shot with a .38s&w COM.

FotoTomas
June 21, 2006, 03:38 PM
If I keep this revolver after some fun in the sun then I will also get a set of .38 S&W dies for the reloading press. I bet some round nose lead reloads would be just the ticket. :)

Vern Humphrey
June 21, 2006, 04:16 PM
Push down on the release lever with the thumb, grab barrel and pull down.

You don't have any problems with empty cases falling back into the chamber and tying up the gun?

Thefabulousfink
June 21, 2006, 05:40 PM
No problem on mine, it is an ejector rather than an extractor. The empties go flying unless you open it slowly. My friend has the Uberti Schofield and it simply extracts the cases and you have to remove them or dump them out.

I have had one incident when I opened the gun slowly but not slow enough and the empty case jumped off the ejector but fell back into the cylinder and got stuck between the the open ejector and cylinder. That took both hands and a few seconds to clear, but not major trouble. As long as you open the action with some vigor, the cases should all fly clear.

Vern Humphrey
June 21, 2006, 05:52 PM
I have had one incident when I opened the gun slowly but not slow enough and the empty case jumped off the ejector but fell back into the cylinder and got stuck between the the open ejector and cylinder. That took both hands and a few seconds to clear, but not major trouble.

That's the kind of stoppage I had in mind. The manual of arms with the Schoefield was to open the gun upside down so cases would fall clear -- much as the proper procedure with a swing out cylinder is to point the muzzle straight up while ejecting cases.

Thefabulousfink
June 21, 2006, 06:01 PM
You can open the webley/enfield upside down, but I have never seen the need. Unless you are a wimp like I was that one time, a properly working gun does a good job of clearing the cylinder. From what I have seen, most older military guns were designed to be operated with firm, brisk movements. I have seen similar jams on old mauser and 1903 bolt-actions when they are not cycled briskly.

dbarale
June 21, 2006, 06:39 PM
Do you know if the .38S&W will be enough to make minor for IPSC/USPSA?
It would be funny to compete against the guys with 625JM's with an old war horse...

cherryriver
June 23, 2006, 06:49 AM
Safariland Comp IIs worked in my Mk IV. The much better Comp IIIs were some trouble, though.
I could never jerk a bullet up fast enough in .38 S&W to make minor. You need to get a 158gr going close to 800fps, and I ran out of nerve at 700-725, although I didn't pursue it too far.
I also thought about using 200gr bullets, as the Mk IV was designed for, but didn't finish that line, either.
At club matches, you're not likely to be challenged except by the gamiest rule-squeezer.
I, too, planned on running one of the local "IDPA" 3-gun matches with an SMLE and a Winchester 97 to go along with the Mk IV, but I'd have to borrow the shotgun from one of the SASS lads to do it.
I do frequently use my Mk VI in .45ACP with moonclips in USPSA, where the six-inch barrel is both legal and helpful. I can't say the gun is much slower than a stock 625, but the palm burns on the left hand from unloading and showing clear after a long, 36-round field course do earn one a sort of respect.
Bill

FotoTomas
June 23, 2006, 09:16 AM
You don't have any problems with empty cases falling back into the chamber and tying up the gun?

What the FabFink said! :)

I too have not had much trouble with brisk ejection. The expanded brass makes for enough friction to let the ejector do its job when opened briskly. I do however cant my revolver to the right briskly as the barrel is being pulled down.

Do you know if the .38S&W will be enough to make minor for IPSC/USPSA? It would be funny to compete against the guys with 625JM's with an old war horse...

As mentioned by others it is doubtfull unless you go with the original English loading of the .38/200. Even then I would not push it too hard as that was a borderline power factor. I used to cast my own lead 25 years ago and could have easily worked up a safe 200 grain load but I no longer play with the melting pot and will shoot this one for fun matches only. Avoids the trouble of casting and or finding a proper 200 grain bullet as well as the gamers and their technicalities. :D

For me burning powder is a fun pastime as opposed to an exercise of technical competence while reading a rule book. Liking the old war horses myself, it is fun to see how well they do when modern technique is applied to older technology. I have found out that the most obnoxious firearm design can sing well when a skilled shooter that cares puts her through her paces. :)

P-35/53
June 23, 2006, 03:11 PM
I have loaded mine using a HKS speedloader made for a Model 10.

Firehand
November 8, 2006, 12:15 AM
Lyman makes a mold that throws a 190 or 195-grain roundnose bullet(can't remember which offhand). I use them as-cast and lube with Lee Liquid Alox, with a load of Unique to drive it. I haven't had the chance to put it over a chronograph, but from what I've read, and that it shoots to point of aim, I think it duplicates the original .380/200 load.

FotoTomas
February 25, 2007, 02:17 AM
Just a post scrip.

The revolver was a blast in the few matches I shot and it has since been sold. I confess the .38 S&W was a accurate and mild shooting cartridge and much fun. The old revolver was also a conversation starter. I might start looking for an old S&W I frame Terrier to finish off the rounds I have left. :)

cherryriver
February 25, 2007, 10:07 PM
You can find a Colt Police Positive in .38 S&W for decent money that will be extraordinarily accurate and a pleasure to shoot. There's many tens of thousands of them floating around. I let one go last autumn at $175 that was in very good condition (because I was chasing something else).
Bill

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