letter to the Commandant of the Marine Corps


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wingnutx
June 16, 2006, 04:34 PM
sub: In support of Cpl. Joshua Belile

Sir,

As a veteran of the conflict in Iraq, I am appalled at the treatment of this Marine. Please realize that punishing him for this is not only unjust, it will have a serious effect on morale. Marines sacrificing their own to appease CAIR's sense of political correctness is the latest event in a long trend which has driven many good men from service. How can we ask a man to serve knowing that his chain of command will scapegoat him at the slightest hint of bad publicity?

Please support your Marines, sir. It is the honorable thing to do.

thank you,

Wingnutx

comrel@hqmc.usmc.mil

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DKSuddeth
June 16, 2006, 07:14 PM
you'll have to forgive me for not following up on my fellow marines plight, but who is he and what is happening to him?

Sergeant Bob
June 16, 2006, 07:29 PM
It's about this:

http://www.jdnews.com/SiteProcessor.cfm?Template=/GlobalTemplates/Details.cfm&StoryID=42520&Section=News

Humor attempt falls flat
June 14,2006
CHRIS MAZZOLINI View stories by reporter
DAILY NEWS STAFF

Cpl. Joshua Belile thought up the words to “Hadji Girl” in September while drinking coffee with buddies in Iraq.

It was just a joke, Belile says, a play on lines from a movie. His fellow Marines seemed to enjoy the song, so they got Belile up on a stage with his guitar.

Someone taped his performance, and now Belile stands in the center of a growing controversy, one that threatens to drag the New River Air Station Marine and his blackly humorous song into the debate about the alleged incident at Haditha and the war in Iraq.

The four-minute, 13-second video of Belile’s performance was initially posted to the Internet site YouTube. The song tells the story of a Marine in Iraq who falls in love with an Iraqi girl. The girl takes the Marine to her family’s house.

But the family shoots the girl and then points their “AKs” at the Marine. The Marine then grabs the Iraqi girl’s little sister and “put her in front of me.”

“As the bullets begin to fly, the blood sprayed from between her eyes and then I laughed maniacally,” according to the song’s lyrics. “Then I hid behind the TV and I locked and loaded my M-16, I blew those little (expletive) to eternity.”

Belile, a 23-year-old who lives in Jacksonville and serves with Marine Light/Attack Helicopter Squadron 167, said the song was meant only as a joke, based on lines from “Team America: World Police” and that he apologizes to people who may have been offended by the lyrics.

“It’s a song that I made up and it was nothing more than something supposed to be funny, based off a catchy line of a movie,” Belile said. “I apologize for any feelings that may have been hurt in the Muslim community. This song was written in good humor and not aimed at any party, foreign or domestic.”

Good humor or not, the Marine Corps is now investigating.

“The Marine Corps has recently been made aware of a video posted to a website that purports to show a Marine singing an insensitive song about Iraqis,” reads a statement released Tuesday from Headquarters Marine Corps. “The video has subsequently been removed from the website.

“The video that was posted anonymously is clearly inappropriate and contrary to the high standards expected of all Marines,” the statement continues. “The video is not reflective of the tremendous sacrifices and dedication demonstrated, on a daily basis, by tens of thousands of Marines who have assisted the Iraqi people in gaining their freedom.”

Belile returned from Iraq in March and is a member of a band called Sweater Kittenz, which is scheduled to perform Saturday at the Riverwalk Festival in downtown Jacksonville.

Soon after his return, Belile discovered the video had found its way onto the Internet. So did the Council on American-Islamic Relations, a Washington D.C.-based group whose stated aim is to enhance understanding of Islam.

Ibrahim Hooper, the group’s communications director, said members of his group got wind of the video through e-mail. After viewing it, Hooper said they found it offensive and in bad taste.

“I think we agree with the Marine Corps, who issued a statement today, that the video is inappropriate and insensitive and shouldn’t be taken as a reflection on the entire body of U.S. military personnel,” he said.

Hooper said he does not agree with arguments that the song was only a joke.

“I don’t think it is a joking matter when you talk about holding up a child to being shot,” he said. “I think especially when we have the allegations of attacks on civilians by military personnel in Haditha and other areas.”

In his defense, Belile said the song is entirely fictional and has no ties to any of the ongoing investigations about Haditha and other incidents of alleged troop misconduct.

“This is in no way, shape or form related to the events that happened at Haditha,” he said. “The song was written long before the events happened. The song reflects nobody’s viewpoint. It’s completely made up, it’s completely fictional.

“I think it was a joke that is trying to be taken seriously,” he said. “I think it’s a joke, and anybody who tries to take it seriously knows it’s a joke. People can’t just laugh at it and let it go.”

After first talking to The Daily News on Tuesday, Belile said in a follow-up telephone call that he had been advised to wait to make a statement until after he received counsel. He asked to have his earlier comments retracted and replaced with “no comment.”

He is expected to be briefed by his command today.

Belile said he was worried about how the video will affect his career, his family and the Marine Corps.

“I will never perform this song again, and I will remove all video and text in relation to this that I have control of,” he said.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations had the video posted on its Web site on Tuesday.

DKSuddeth
June 16, 2006, 08:33 PM
you know, I feel for this kid, I really do, but some common sense needs to be used for things like this. making up the song, singing the song, even audio recording the song for the internet could be ok and gotten away with (how can you prove it was really me captain?), but to do it on video, while you're stationed in a combat zone, and describing some rather gruesome stuff that paints the iraqis in a less than admirable light (not to mention the marines) isn't very smart.

I know it's a joke, I know it's just meant to entertain him and his fellow marines, but it didn't end up that way. Hopefully this will work out but I have a bad feeling that he'll be used as an example of what not to do in a foreign country.

rbernie
June 16, 2006, 09:40 PM
Something tells me that this isn't the first time that a soldier has made some off-color comments to break the strain of maybe being blown, hacked, or otherwise rendered into chum. <shrug> Probably won't be the last, either.

I'm sure that the Taliban or Iraqi insurgency have a few good pokes at US culture and mannerisms.

Whatever.

.41Dave
June 17, 2006, 01:17 AM
If anyone is interested in a Muslim and fellow veteran's opinion: I think the song and it's video shows poor taste, poor judgement, and a questionable sense of humor at best. I find the song pretty offensive. That said, he's done little harm other than causing offense, and he's apologized for that. It does not seem to me that he should suffer any further negative repercussions or damage to his USMC career.

BigFatKen
June 17, 2006, 01:39 AM
My CO in RVN called me about an explosion. One of my men went off to have a bowel movement and tripped a crude hand gernade in a can booby trap. No one hurt. He saw it and took cover.

So, CO asks why did he go so far from our location? I reply "he went to take a sierria". So CO asks "What does sierra nean?" So I told him what it srands for. It was a direct order. He wanted to Court Marshall me for swearing on the radio. Some one higher up hear it. I refused to siign a paper (Article 15?) and told them to CM me. Nothing happened after that.

I guess some things never change.

JesseJames
June 18, 2006, 08:26 AM
Vulgarity and soldiering go hand in hand. That is why there is thing called 'discipline' in the military.
This is something that the effete class doesn't seem to entirely grasp or comprehend. There are those few officers who are wise to it and know better. They know how to utilize it, therefore being more effective leaders. I've seen it.
This is something that the 'politically correct' officers are trying to stomp out which is entirely WRONG.
If you walk into a locker room you have to expect raw talk. If you don't like it go back to your poetry corner.

DunedinDragon
June 18, 2006, 08:47 AM
I totally agree. Part of being in the trenches is gallows humor associated with the enemy. This deserves nothing more than a hand slap and a counseling session. Not more political fodder for anti-war demonstrators.

leadcounsel
June 18, 2006, 10:04 AM
So the Marine has a bad sense of humor. :eek:

Big deal.

There's a WAR on. HE didn't commit any war crimes. Who cares!

Tell him to use better judgement in the future and move along.

crazed_ss
June 18, 2006, 10:11 AM
If you're gonna do something like this, you better make absolutely sure that it doesnt make it out of your unit.

Kentak
June 18, 2006, 10:15 AM
What's the penalty in the Corps for being stupid?

Nehemiah Scudder
June 18, 2006, 10:21 AM
Sock party?

crazed_ss
June 18, 2006, 10:26 AM
What's the penalty in the Corp for being stupid?

Corps :)

They'd probably charge him under Article 134 of the UCMJ.
He'll probably get NJP (article 15). I doubt there would be a courts-martial unless he denied the NJP which would not be a smart move.

Punishment would most likely be forfeiture of some pay and a couple weeks restriction to barracks...

Or they could just give him a "6105" which is like a formal reprimand that goes in his Service Record Book. Considering the media attention that this has gotten, I doubt he'll get off that easy.


Article 134. General article. Includes offenses that are not specifically listed in the Manual for Courts-Martial and which may "cause disorder and neglect to the prejudice of good order and discipline in the armed forces, or conduct of a nature to bring discredit upon the armed forces." Article 134 is often considered to be a "catch-all" for various offenses that aren't necessarily covered by the other articles in the UCMJ. Article

DRZinn
June 18, 2006, 10:41 AM
Bad judgement, deserving of nothing more than a slap on the wrist. I recommend a NPLC.

(Non-Punitive Letter of Caution)

'Card
June 18, 2006, 10:46 AM
*shrug*

Wasn't all that long ago when I was in the US Army Airborne Infantry, when we'd sing cadences, while running, in formation, that were a hell of a lot more vulgar and offensive than anything this Marine sang about.

Anyone else remember "napalm sticks to kids"? Or the one about throwing some candy on the ground, open up that .50cal, "bodies, bodies, bodies"? That sort of thing wasn't unusual. That was the norm. We were expected to be warriors, and killers, and a black sense of humor came with the territory.

This whole situation is absurd.

crazed_ss
June 18, 2006, 10:55 AM
Wasn't all that long ago when I was in the US Army Airborne Infantry, when we'd sing cadences, while running, in formation, that were a hell of a lot more vulgar and offensive than anything this Marine sang about.

Anyone else remember "napalm sticks to kids"? Or the one about throwing some candy on the ground, open up that .50cal, "bodies, bodies, bodies"? That sort of thing wasn't unusual. That was the norm. We were expected to be warriors, and killers, and a black sense of humor came with the territory.

This whole situation is absurd.

Yea.. we did that too.

We didnt tape it and upload it to youtube though :)

We sung cadences about women, "towelheads", and everything else. The thing is when knew the time and place though. We never sung those cadences when doing PT around mainside or places where some officer could hear us or some civilian worker might get offended.

rbernie
June 18, 2006, 10:58 AM
Anyone else remember "napalm sticks to kids"? And several variations thereof.

Or the one about throwing some candy on the ground, open up that .50cal, "bodies, bodies, bodies"? Well, I musta missed that one.

We were expected to be warriors, and killers, and a black sense of humor came with the territory.

This whole situation is absurd.
That's a fact.

In my opinion, this Marine's failing was in allowing the tape to be made and published, not in the performance itself.

You can't ask folks to put their body in harms' way and then expect them to decompress by singing touching ballads about ponies and unicorns and fluffy marshmallow love.

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