Become a Politician and do what you want


PDA






docfubar
June 18, 2006, 12:57 PM
Grand Jury Declines to Indict McKinney

WASHINGTON Jun 16, 2006 (AP)— A grand jury declined Friday to indict Rep. Cynthia McKinney in connection with a confrontation in which she admitted hitting a police officer who tried to stop her from entering a House office building.

The grand jury had been considering the case since shortly after the March 29 incident, which has led to much discussion on Capitol Hill about race and the conduct of lawmakers and the officers who protect them.

"We respect the decision of the grand jury in this difficult matter," said U.S. Attorney Kenneth Wainstein.

His statement, released late Friday, also included support for the officer involved, Paul McKenna, and the Capitol Police. He said, "This is a tremendously difficult job, and it is one that Officer McKenna and his colleagues perform with the utmost professionalism and dignity."

With that, Wainstein closed a case that has simmered with racial and political tension.

"I am relieved that this unfortunate incident is behind me," McKinney said in a statement Friday night. "I accept today's grand jury finding of 'no probable cause' as right and just and the proper resolution of this case."

The encounter began when McKinney, D-Ga., tried to enter a House office building without walking through a metal detector or wearing the lapel pin that identifies members of Congress.

McKenna did not recognize her as a member of Congress and asked her three times to stop. When she ignored him, he tried to stop her. McKinney then hit him.

McKinney described the encounter as "racial profiling," insisting she had been assaulted and had done nothing wrong.

McKinney is black. McKenna is white.

She received little public support for that stance, even within the Congressional Black Caucus.

Wainstein, meanwhile, sought an indictment from a federal grand jury, with assault on a police officer mentioned in the filings as a possible charge. That is a felony that would require an indictment.

The grand jury then subpoenaed several House aides thought to have witnessed the encounter. McKenna, too, testified. The grand jury voted not to indict her. Prosecutors also could have charged McKinney with simple assault without having to seek an indictment.

Members of the black caucus privately urged McKinney to put the matter behind her. The next morning, she appeared on the House floor to apologize.

"I am sorry that this misunderstanding happened at all, and I regret its escalation, and I apologize," McKinney, D-Ga., said April 6. "There should not have been any physical contact in this incident."


http://www.abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory?id=2087152

If you enjoyed reading about "Become a Politician and do what you want" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Biker
June 18, 2006, 01:04 PM
If that was me that hit the cop, I'd still be in the Crossbar Motel, eating fried green baloney and soggy bread.
Ya gotta wonder...

Biker

docfubar
June 18, 2006, 01:25 PM
Biker you and me both .......but we don't have the female race card to throw.

longeyes
June 18, 2006, 01:28 PM
Perhaps McKinney will become Queen of Zimbabwe, where she can be fully appreciated. That country needs a change of regime, badly.

Zen21Tao
June 18, 2006, 01:30 PM
There is definitly a double standard when it comes to treatment of Politicians and treatment of average citizens.

- Cynthia Mckenny punches/strikes a police officer and not charged with battery.
- Patrick Kennedy driven home and not given beathalizer after crashing car into barricade.
- FBI finds $90 in the freezer of Congressman Jefferson Davis
- Ted Kennedy drove car into lake and left Mary Jo Kopechne trappend inside while he went back to his hotel to sober up.
- Bill Clinton blatently lies before a Grand Jury

There is also the famous double standard of congress people being allowed to have concealed carry permits in highly restricted states where most average citizens aren't. What is especially tastless is that some of these congress people preach antigun messages, vote in favor of antigun legislation and even draft the legislation themselves. What Hypocrites!

longeyes
June 18, 2006, 01:34 PM
The USSR didn't fall, it moved. And we have our own little nomenklatura.

zoom6zoom
June 18, 2006, 05:35 PM
"I am sorry that this misunderstanding happened at all, and I regret its escalation, and I apologize," McKinney, D-Ga., said April 6. "There should not have been any physical contact in this incident."

Oh, that sounded SO sincere.

Nightfall
June 18, 2006, 05:59 PM
I am sorry that this misunderstanding happened at all, and I regret its escalation, and I apologize," McKinney, D-Ga., said April 6. "There should not have been any physical contact in this incident."A real apology would have said "I'm sorry I was rude, and I'm sorry I assaulted that officer for enforcing security procedures." Notice her apology carefully avoids any admission of wrong doing.

She is sorry this misunderstanding happened. Not sorry that she caused a "misunderstanding".

She regrets that it escalated. She doesn't say she regrets she escalated it.

There should not have been any physical contact... not "I shouldn't have hit him."

I really feel for that guy having to work with those politicians day in and out.

bouis
June 18, 2006, 06:07 PM
This doesn't have so much to do with being a politician as being a black politician. Chide me all you want, but if this had been Trent Lott hitting a black cop, a Washington, DC grand jury would have indicted him for capital murder if they could.

WeedWhacker
June 18, 2006, 06:20 PM
zoom6zoom,
More to the point, it wasn't an apology at all. It was a thinly disguised middle-finger to McKenna.

"I am sorry that this misunderstanding happened at all", that McKenna didn't know her by sight (since she didn't have her required ID pin
"I regret its escalation" that he grabbed her arm
"and I apologize" for making a scene? I guess a "sorry" had to be there, somewhere
"There should not have been any physical contact in this incident." "He should not have grabbed my arm after I ignored him"

Disgusting, both from the DA and the grand jury.

Bartholomew Roberts
June 18, 2006, 06:25 PM
Actually, probably a wise decision on the part of the grand jury since McKinney has a decent constitutional argument:

Art. I Sec. 6
They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the Session of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in any other Place.

Standing Wolf
June 18, 2006, 11:03 PM
The Democratic (sic) party fix is in—again.

Art Eatman
June 18, 2006, 11:42 PM
"...and in going to and returning from the same..." seems to put "paid" to any argument about it.

Art

longeyes
June 18, 2006, 11:47 PM
They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the Session of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in any other Place.

Assaulting a cop isn't breach of the peace?

The woman's a disgrace.

Bartholomew Roberts
June 19, 2006, 12:07 AM
The purpose of writing that in to the Constitution was to insure that law enforcement couldn't be used to stop representatives from voting without a very serious reason.

Even though I regard Cynthia McKinney as a borderline mental case, I would much rather she take a swipe at a Capitol Hill police officer once a year rather than run the chance that the state can control who does or does not vote by stopping an elected representative from voting in that circumstance.

The woman's a disgrace.

No question about it; but that is a different question than the one we are faced with here. It seems to me that the underlying concepts behind granting immunity in the first place are much more important than seeing Rep. McKinney brought up on legal charges. She still has to face the disapproval of society if not the law, and that can be more cutting to a Representative in any case.

From a practical perspective, conservatives have made good political hay out of the question and McKinney has hurt her own causes immeasurably. I don't really see a need to grant the government the ability to interfere with a Representative voting on the grounds alleged here. Remember that what you wish for today may be used against you in the future when someone else has the helm.

BigRobT
June 19, 2006, 12:15 AM
There's just NO excuse that these people get a "free pass" while others are forced to resign, drummed out of office, in prison, etc. It sure seems as a "do as I say, not as I do" type Democratic Party leadership.

Hayward Juhbuzzoff
June 19, 2006, 12:42 AM
Is this issue basically much ado about nothing?

We have a government bought by the highest bidder, we have congresspersons adding late-night pork to legislation, we have civil liberties being quietly yanked for the sake of "national security," and yet we're concerned about a woman hitting a cop on the chest?...

If that's the most stress he has as a cop, he should consider himself lucky. If he's really that upset about it, he can sue her for all his pain and suffering... you know, from having a woman hitting him on his chest...

The attention to this event seems a little silly in my opinion...

WeedWhacker
June 19, 2006, 01:19 AM
Bart:
They shall in all Cases, except Treason, Felony and Breach of the Peace, be privileged from Arrest during their Attendance at the Session of their respective Houses, and in going to and returning from the same; and for any Speech or Debate in either House, they shall not be questioned in any other Place.
It is my understanding that this dictates that the Congresscritters can't be arrested "during their Attendance", to and from, etc., but that the police can then arrest them immediately afterwards and then carry on as with any other normal citizen. It does *not* mean that Congresscritters are above the law.

On the other hand...Remember that what you wish for today may be used against you in the future when someone else has the helm.Truer words have never been spo... um, typed.

mljdeckard
June 19, 2006, 02:00 AM
I'm not concerned about having the tables turned in the future. A politician who hits a cop should be punished, no matter what party they belong to.

It sucks, but they took it to a grand jury, and the grand jury refused to indict. It doesn't get any more fundamentally fair than that. All I will do is roll my eyes and walk away.

The stupidest thing is, she will probably get reelected.

bouis
June 19, 2006, 02:38 AM
I'm pretty sure that "breaches of the peace" in ye olde days referred to what we'd call "violent crimes" today. This surely includes assault/battery of a police officer.

If you enjoyed reading about "Become a Politician and do what you want" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!